First timer welding


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  1. #1
    Member flexbex's Avatar
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    Default First timer welding

    Hello I want to build my CNC from 4mm steel tubes. For this I need to weld several parts. For me it is the second time I do welding and the first time using a Tig welder. So I have some questions what you can recommend. I watched several YT videos and will also train before on scrap metall.
    For the welding I have some basic questions.
    What diameter should I choose for my Tig welding tip/tungsten?
    I am not sure which type of welding rod I can get hands on. What should I look for. I will use basic steel can't say the exact material.
    For the joints I have also some questions. I was reading that I should leave a gap between my welding parts so that the welder also connects inside and not only on the surface. But I have some parts where this is not possible. For example I want to weld on some plates to thicken my steel on some parts so I can do a thread inside. Should I maybe grind an angle on the edges of the plate so the welder can access more the inside.
    Sorry I know these will be stupid questions for somebody doing it for longer. But I am really keen to learn more..

    P.s. I live in Vietnam where I don't speak the language. So it's sometimes difficult to get the right material.


    Regards Felix

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    Last edited by flexbex; 10-22-2018 at 09:18 PM.


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    Member peteeng's Avatar
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    Default Re: First timer welding

    Hello Felix - I used to teach TIG welding many years ago. For the router you need to use tight fits, no gaps. A gap will allow the joint to shrink and distort. So make the fits as best as you can. For a router the joints do not need to be very strong so you do not need to do full penetration welds. For 4mm thick steel I'd be using a 1.6mm or 2.3mm tungsten. I would try to move along quite fast using a 2.3mm wire or even a 1.6mm but you would have to be quick. As a learner set up the cup so it rests on the job but the tungsten does not, this will prevent you from stubbing the tungsten, common for learners. ie you drag the cup along the surface. Once you get stronger and steadier you can then hold the torch in air. You want a short arc. You also want to linish the metal clean before you weld. Any dirt grease or paint upsets a tig arc very easily. Use a pointed tungsten and keep it clean. Use good gloves so you don't burn yourself and use long heavy sleeves so you don't burn your arms ( I have scars to attest to that one). Plus use sunscreen as the arc will give you sunburn as well. Or cover up really well. Practice makes perfect...

    One thing you can try is tig brazing with a bronze rod. You don't actually melt the parent which is an advantage when learning and also means the distortion of the weld is very much reduced. If I was to build a steel frame or steel parts for a router I would torch braze or tig braze for this reason. I oxy torch braze this sort of thing these days to minimise distortion and stress relieve as it goes. Peter



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    Default Re: First timer welding

    Quote Originally Posted by peteeng View Post
    Hello Felix - I used to teach TIG welding many years ago. For the router you need to use tight fits, no gaps. A gap will allow the joint to shrink and distort. So make the fits as best as you can. For a router the joints do not need to be very strong so you do not need to do full penetration welds. For 4mm thick steel I'd be using a 1.6mm or 2.3mm tungsten. I would try to move along quite fast using a 2.3mm wire or even a 1.6mm but you would have to be quick. As a learner set up the cup so it rests on the job but the tungsten does not, this will prevent you from stubbing the tungsten, common for learners. ie you drag the cup along the surface. Once you get stronger and steadier you can then hold the torch in air. You want a short arc. You also want to linish the metal clean before you weld. Any dirt grease or paint upsets a tig arc very easily. Use a pointed tungsten and keep it clean. Use good gloves so you don't burn yourself and use long heavy sleeves so you don't burn your arms ( I have scars to attest to that one). Plus use sunscreen as the arc will give you sunburn as well. Or cover up really well. Practice makes perfect...

    One thing you can try is tig brazing with a bronze rod. You don't actually melt the parent which is an advantage when learning and also means the distortion of the weld is very much reduced. If I was to build a steel frame or steel parts for a router I would torch braze or tig braze for this reason. I oxy torch braze this sort of thing these days to minimise distortion and stress relieve as it goes. Peter
    You used to teach...I am trying to learn my HF MIG. I never know how hot to make it. I have done the CAP mod to my welder so its hotter than the stock. So how do I learn this seems I can't lay a good bead...



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    Default Re: First timer welding

    Hi Truck - The machine supplier will have a book on typical weld settings. You need to get a plate and run "stringers" when learning just run stringers on a plate do no try to bring two pieces of metal together. So say you have a 3mm steel plate look up the setting amps and voltage, it may even suggest a speed. If it does suggest a speed dry run and time say a 150mm pass so you know your speed is about right. Then try to run the stringer. Watch the puddle and listen to the noise. Start slow and speed up and at some point the puddle will be stable and the noise will be stable. Practice practice practice. Don't change things too often until you get a good bead. Patience and practice cheers Peter



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