First Home Made CNC router


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    Default First Home Made CNC router

    Hello all. I made my first cnc Milling machine/router out of steel. The work table is around 350 KG heavy and the walking bridge with the otehr two axis about 150 KG heavy. The moters are never used and probably will never be used as they are too low. Same as for the working head, it's just not powerfull enough.

    Working axis: 1350 x 1050 x 250 mm(milimeters)

    Any comments would be appreciated.

    Thank you for reading.












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    It's looking pretty good so far. What's the problem with the motors? How do you know they won't work? How much power are you giving them, and what kind of drivers are you using?

    Andrew Werby
    ComputerSculpture.com — Home Page for Discount Hardware & Software



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    Hows the flex? Nice looking machine. How much did it cost for machining or did you machine it?



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    Quote Originally Posted by SpeedsCustom View Post
    Hows the flex? Nice looking machine. How much did it cost for machining or did you machine it?

    I machined it myself out of old steel plates. It costed me about 2500 euros to make the machine togheter with the steel plates (around 400-500 kg steel), motors, drivers, spindels and linear guides.

    It will be sold probably sold for the triple of the price.



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    Quote Originally Posted by awerby View Post
    It's looking pretty good so far. What's the problem with the motors? How do you know they won't work? How much power are you giving them, and what kind of drivers are you using?

    Andrew Werby
    ComputerSculpture.com — Home Page for Discount Hardware & Software

    The motors will work of course, but they are just too low... I like some power but those are about 3 Nm motors and i want to work in steel with those machine, it should cut about 2 milimeters of steel in one run/cut.

    I want some 9Nm motors or stronger than I will try it.



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    I don't see that machine cutting steel very effectively. Take a look at mills that are designed to cut steel - they are built much differently. They need a lot more rigidity than your tall moving gantry design will afford. Your machine will probably work pretty well on wood and plastics, but aluminum would be problematic and steel pretty much out of the question. But if that's all heavy steel plate that it's built from, then you probably will need very powerful motors to push it around reliably.

    If you're really making this for sale, you should try it on steel yourself before telling people that's going to work. Be ready to break some tools...

    Andrew Werby
    ComputerSculpture.com — Home Page for Discount Hardware & Software



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    Quote Originally Posted by awerby View Post
    I don't see that machine cutting steel very effectively.
    that was my 1st thought, but looking at it and reading, maybe it just in the wrong section here, and not intended to 'mill' steel ???

    nice work all the same

    My 1st Build (ongoing) http://www.cnczone.com/forums/diy-cnc_router_table_machines/134670-one_big_one_smaller_my.html


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    Quote Originally Posted by awerby View Post
    I don't see that machine cutting steel very effectively. Take a look at mills that are designed to cut steel - they are built much differently. They need a lot more rigidity than your tall moving gantry design will afford. Your machine will probably work pretty well on wood and plastics, but aluminum would be problematic and steel pretty much out of the question. But if that's all heavy steel plate that it's built from, then you probably will need very powerful motors to push it around reliably.

    If you're really making this for sale, you should try it on steel yourself before telling people that's going to work. Be ready to break some tools...

    Andrew Werby
    ComputerSculpture.com — Home Page for Discount Hardware & Software

    I tried google for routers that mill steel and don't see anything. Maybe i type something wrong. You have any pictures of any router that mills steel as i would love to see that.



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    Default There's a reason for that

    "I tried google for routers that mill steel and don't see anything. Maybe i type something wrong. You have any pictures of any router that mills steel as i would love to see that."

    That's because routers can't mill steel. By the time you've constructed something heavy-duty enough to deal with it, you've built a mill; it would no longer be described as a router. On the Levil site, note the differences between the model (of mill - they don't call them routers) that can mill steel and the one that can do soft metals at best. Square rails, not round. Compact design, not much travel in any axis, with heavy construction. And a high-torque spindle that cuts at speeds down to 100 RPM.

    Andrew Werby
    ComputerSculpture.com — Home Page for Discount Hardware & Software



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    Quote Originally Posted by awerby
    That's because routers can't mill steel.
    I think it must be possible with a fixed gantry and a moving table.
    But, you are right just for small workpieces.

    greetings



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    I agree with most thats been said about it cutting steel.

    The gantry is far to high and is not necessary needed this high,the lower the gantry the better it performs.
    You will experience side rocking motion on this.



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    Quote Originally Posted by T.W.O. View Post
    I think it must be possible with a fixed gantry and a moving table.
    But, you are right just for small workpieces.

    greetings
    Damn, i forgot this beefy steelcutting router from a Dutch builder.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jmUrnC7cVbc]Machine vise test - YouTube

    Buildthread on the cncworld.nl forum (you must register to see the pictures)
    Project Goalkeeper : metalcutting router

    greetings



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