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Thread: Lake Shore Carbide TAS

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    Default Lake Shore Carbide TAS

    I need to slot a round profile about 3.75 inches in diameter on a 6061-t6 workpiece and I am trying to use a LSC 1/4 TAS EM. The reason for slotting is that I have screws in the way and the .25 EM can clear them when doing the profile. I am using a Pierson vacuum table and a top plate to hold the workpiece in place.

    I am currently cutting with the .25" WOC and a DOC of .08 while running with a 20ipm feed rate along with a 10ipm for ramp and 5000rpm on my 1100.

    I tried looking into using GWizard to see if I can speed things up and after applying all the settings I get a womping 90ipm for feed rate. This seems excessively fast so I wanted to know if anyone has any experience with running these TAS EM and what recommended feed and speeds can I really push them to.

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    Default Re: Lake Shore Carbide TAS

    I run that cutter with an 2d adaptive toolpath at .004 IPT, so at 5000 RPM thats 60 IPM (and a .25" DOC)

    The biggest problem is getting the chips cleared in a pocket op

    EDIT: Actually had a youtube video uploaded





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    Default

    Thanks for reply.

    I noticed that in my original post that I made an error with how I was describing the operation that I was performing. I was not meaning to say that I was doing a pocket op but rather I was slotting to cut out a disc that was 3.75" in diameter.

    I am not sure if the 60ipm would still apply. It is only 1/4" thick workpiece so it is fairly shallow and I am using 2 fog busters aimed directly at the EM/slot in order to help with chip evacuation.



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    Default Re: Lake Shore Carbide TAS

    I use the 1/4" TAS. A few things to keep in mind

    1 - If you have an ATC, be careful. It likes to pull out.
    2 - If you have a power drawbar make sure its adjusted. same reason as above
    3 - I've run it at .490 DOC, .100 woc at 90ipm with no issues. No ATC, flood with air blast, and my power drawbar is as tight as can be.
    3 - Depending on how wide your slot is and how you're cutting the slot, you might never see 90ipm because the tormach cant accelerate that fast. With the above recipe, I see 90ipm during contour ops, but only 20-30ipm when I'm cutting a .300 wide slot with an adaptive toolpath.






    Tormach PCNC 1100 Series 3 w/ Rapid Turn, Fusion 360


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    Default Re: Lake Shore Carbide TAS

    Hi - I used this design years ago. While they had a much higher metal removal rate, they were more expensive and did not last as long as standard straight flutes, so we went away from them in the end.....

    I wonder if history will repeat itself here....

    Let us know how well they last.

    Cliff



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    Default Re: Lake Shore Carbide TAS

    Quote Originally Posted by nodott View Post
    Thanks for reply.

    I noticed that in my original post that I made an error with how I was describing the operation that I was performing. I was not meaning to say that I was doing a pocket op but rather I was slotting to cut out a disc that was 3.75" in diameter.

    I am not sure if the 60ipm would still apply. It is only 1/4" thick workpiece so it is fairly shallow and I am using 2 fog busters aimed directly at the EM/slot in order to help with chip evacuation.
    t
    Be careful with just the fogbusters. I've got the same setup and it's easy to load up the flutes and chipweld it. I usually also blow chips out with hand held telescoping shop air. The TTS pullout is real with any aggressive cutting.



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    Default Re: Lake Shore Carbide TAS

    What a he heck is a LSC TAS end mill?

    You can buy GOOD PARTS or you can buy CHEAP PARTS, but you can't buy GOOD CHEAP PARTS.


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    Default Re: Lake Shore Carbide TAS

    I do not have an ATC so no worries there. I really don't want to run it at max ipm but would like to see at least 30 or 40 ipm. I am cutting only .25" material that is being held down on a Pierson Vacuum table top plate. Unfortunately I have screws too close to the slot so 2d adaptive is not possible which is why I am left with only slotting. I have been doing multiple passes each with at 0.08 DOC and at 20ipm with 10ipm for ramping. Tthis has become quite a slow process.

    I was thinking about doing a ramp at startup and have it settle at just about .255" and then have it continue the slot op at the .255" DOC. Of course this will give me WOC @ .25" and I would not want to drive it really hard especially since I have the workpiece being held down by vacuum. Any increase in ipm to help is what I am ultimately looking for.

    Last edited by nodott; 01-19-2018 at 11:51 PM.


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    Default Re: Lake Shore Carbide TAS



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    Default Re: Lake Shore Carbide TAS

    Im my experience, if you don't have high pressure flood for slotting, better to go fast and shallow. Make smaller chips that are easier to get out.



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