Paint Bleeding into Wood Fibers


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Thread: Paint Bleeding into Wood Fibers

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    Default Paint Bleeding into Wood Fibers

    I'm engraving into wood and I'm having trouble with paint bleeding into the wood fibers. Here's what I did:

    1. I put several coats of polyurethane finish on the wood. I'm using maple. The surface is sealed.
    2. I engraved my image and lettering. The image is 0.01" deep cut with a 60 degree vee bit. The lettering is 0.05" deep with the same bit.
    3. I filled in the image and lettering with flat black latex paint. I covered most the surface and wiped most of the paint off.
    3. After the paint dried, I sanded the remaining paint off the un-engraved surface.

    It looks pretty good from a distance. When I look closely at the image and lettering, the paint has bled into the wood beyond the edges of the engraving. I assume it's capillary action into the wood fibers.

    Does anyone have any suggestions how to stop this bleeding?

    I'm a woodworker so using wood is natural for me. If the solution is to use something other than wood, what do others use?

    Thanks,
    Dick

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    Community Moderator ger21's Avatar
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    Seal the carving with shellac prior to painting.

    Gerry

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    Gerry - thanks!

    I assume you mean use the shellac after the engraving - right?

    Why shellac vs polyurethane? What pound-cut shellac?



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    I engrave first then I polyurethane 3 coats, I also make sure to put it on very heavy in the engraving after it dries at least 8 hours I then paint, I seem to have the best results with krylon( the cans with the directional nozzle). I then sand it off and then polyurethane over it again as I normally would any wood project. I have used this method on pine, red oak, and poplar



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    Community Moderator ger21's Avatar
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    Yes, after engraving.
    Shellac is a better sealer, especially for a latex paint, and it dries very quickly.

    I'd just use the premixed bullseye sealer.

    Gerry

    UCCNC 2017 Screenset
    http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/2017.html

    Mach3 2010 Screenset
    http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/2010.html

    JointCAM - CNC Dovetails & Box Joints
    http://www.g-forcecnc.com/jointcam.html

    (Note: The opinions expressed in this post are my own and are not necessarily those of CNCzone and its management)


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    [QUOTE=ger21;1215872]Yes, after engraving.
    QUOTE]

    The engraving will be crisper if you also use shellac before the the engraving step.

    You may want to try super glue as a finish as well. It's a little harder to apply evenly, but it won't tint the wood yellow like other finishes. It can be polished to a very high gloss if desired.

    MinWax makes a wood hardener and there are also thin epoxies (Git-Rot is an example) that soak into the wood and harden it. Try these on spalted, or even dry-rotted wood.



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    Default Re: Paint Bleeding into Wood Fibers

    You may already know how to do this, but a quick way to paint engraved lettering quickly that works for me...
    1) Engrave. For best results, engrave about 1/32 or so deeper than you need/want to.
    2) Shellac the entire top surface well (including the engraved areas and let dry. (if you're in a real hurry, use fast drying poly or lacquer). As already stated this keeps the paint from bleeding into your wood.
    3) Now spray or brush the color you want on the top, making sure you cover the engraving well. Let dry.
    4. Run it through your planner, sander or use a hand power sander to remove the excess 1/32 (or whatever) top layer, which leaves the paint only in your engraving recesses. Blow it clean with air.
    5) Now clearcoat or seal the surface again with shellac or however you want.
    In the engraved letters the edges/paint will be crisp and this process takes a fraction of the time compared to if you try and paint in the engraved lettering by hand with a brush. A lot of folks use High density foam board for signs which will hold up to weather better than most woods if coated correctly. But the beauty of real wood is tough to match for items that folks will be able to inspect closely. And the wood is usually cheaper as some of the high density foam board can be pricey!



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    Default Re: Paint Bleeding into Wood Fibers

    Shellac isn't good long life outdoor is it?



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    Default Re: Paint Bleeding into Wood Fibers

    I think your problem is using latex paint.. the wood species shouldn't matter that much, especially with a hard wood like maple. Try getting away from latex paint, it takes forever to dry, and while its drying, its soaking into the wood.
    Try either a spray-on ink (I use the MARSH brand of inks) or try using tinted primer. Both dry VERY quickly. Also, use light coats. Spray a very light coat at first, then more light coats as needed.
    Make sure the ink is completely dry or it will clog your sandpaper when sanding.
    I've gotten very good results even with soft woods like pine...the key is not to spray heavy.
    Good luck!



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