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  1. #37
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    Hey everyone, I was wondering if anybody has bought this kit

    (Gecko Diver G540 3 axis kit (One G540 + Three NEMA 23 KL23H284-35-4B (1/4” Dual shaft with a flat) 387 oz-in + one KL-350-48 48V/7.3A 115V /230V power supply: $455.95)

    and if you have if you could give me your opinion on it. and most importantly other than the computer, software, limit switches, e-stop, Is this kit complete?
    The part I`m getting alittle confused about is that other kits include a driver for each motor, does the one Gecko driver control them all?
    And finally does that seem like a decent price?

    Basically I`ve almost finished building a 24" by 48" gantry router mill, while the machine was fairly straightforward to build, 3 days of reading about stepper motors is starting to make my head spin.

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated.



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    Quote Originally Posted by rmorgan View Post
    Hey everyone, I was wondering if anybody has bought this kit

    (Gecko Diver G540 3 axis kit (One G540 + Three NEMA 23 KL23H284-35-4B (1/4” Dual shaft with a flat) 387 oz-in + one KL-350-48 48V/7.3A 115V /230V power supply: $455.95)

    and if you have if you could give me your opinion on it. and most importantly other than the computer, software, limit switches, e-stop, Is this kit complete?
    The part I`m getting alittle confused about is that other kits include a driver for each motor, does the one Gecko driver control them all?
    And finally does that seem like a decent price?

    Basically I`ve almost finished building a 24" by 48" gantry router mill, while the machine was fairly straightforward to build, 3 days of reading about stepper motors is starting to make my head spin.

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
    check here

    First DIY CNC Project : DIY CNC Router Part 2 : System Components |

    Video

    YouTube - ‪Testing Gecko 540 + Keling Steppers + Mach 3 + Surplus Ball Screws‬‏

    He used this kit, but same price
    Gecko Diver G540 3 axis kit (One G540 + Three
    NEMA23 KL23H2100-35-4B (1/4” Dual shaft with a flat) 381
    oz-in + one KL-350-48 48V/7.3A 115V /230Vpower supply:$455.95

    Keling Kit



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    Hi rmorgan, that's my video and site linked above. I have a build post in the DIY Wood Router but my site is more descriptive. I found this post when I was checking my website referrer logs.

    I've been very happy with the kit I bought from Keling and everything has worked great. When the parts arrived, I soldered the DB-9 connectors onto the steppers, connected the power supply to the Gecko 540 and jumped the emergency stop pins on the connector. Plugged it into Mach 3 and had running motors.

    The Gecko runs up to 4 steppers at 3.5 amps, all within that one little box. It's pretty amazing but it does get very warm when running my router. While Gecko says it's alright for it to run hot (up to 70C) I run a 120mm fan across the back of it to keep the temperatures down.

    If you run a motor with an amperage lower than 3.5 amps you need to solder a resistor into the DB-9 connector to set the current limiting for standby mode. That's covered in the Gecko 540 documentation at this URL Support

    -Jon



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    There is a lot of generally good information on figuring out what sized stepper and how fast it will turn and what sort of driver you need at:
    techref.massmind.org/techref/io/steppers.htm#Estimating



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    Here is some simple logic for stepper selection - I'd appreciate any pointers/corrections.

    Given one's desired feedrate and force (let's say 0.1m/s and 50kgf), calculate the final power (50Watts). Factor in gearing losses by multiplying by 2 (100W).

    Once you find a motor giving at least that power, check the datasheet and set the gear ratio such that the motor's 'corner speed' provides the feedrate desired.
    (for 'corner speed' see Support)

    Sound ok?



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    That sounds good to me.



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    Default torque - force conversion

    The stepmotors I've seen usually have torque listed .
    To get from there to force on the table axis, you need to know a radius at which the force acts - but which to use? Radius of motor shaft? Of gearwheel? After pondering for a bit I think the answer is: at whatever point rotational motion is converted to linear motion, the radius of gear at the point of the system is the radius to use in T=FxR , but factor in the gear ratio up to that point.
    So for example with a stepmotor of 200 oz-in. connected through a series of gears that reduce by lets say 10:1, to a final pinion (spur gear) of a rack (linear gear) and pinion, if the pinion is lets say 2in. radius then the F=T/R=200X10/2=1000 oz. force.

    Jeremy



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    ok it looks like what I just wrote is wrong and what is relevant is the
    linear travel per revolution or 'pitch'- so to go from torque to force you use

    F=T x 2Pi/Pitch

    anyone can confirm this?



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    Jeremy, the formula used on the web site:
    techref.massmind.org/techref/io/steppers.htm#Estimating
    works. There are multiple problems with your prior two posts. The biggest problem is that a 200 oz/in stepper motor can't begin to "pull in" 200 oz in. Stepper motors are rated (typically) by /holding torque/ not pull in torque. And even if you find the pull in rating, that changes with the RPM. At higher speeds, bipolar motors drop off in torque rapidly, and unipolar motors drop off as well, but not as fast (bipolar has more torque at lower speeds).

    The formula and calculator on the web site are known, tested, rules of thumb that usually work just fine.



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    Default torque-force calc

    Thanks
    Actually the formula below is ok for speeds below 'corner speed' - the calculator you linked is ok but only equates powers, which is fine, however it does not calculate actual force which is an independent although related quantity.


    my site


    Quote Originally Posted by James Newton View Post
    Jeremy, the formula used on the web site:
    techref.massmind.org/techref/io/steppers.htm#Estimating
    works. There are multiple problems with your prior two posts. The biggest problem is that a 200 oz/in stepper motor can't begin to "pull in" 200 oz in. Stepper motors are rated (typically) by /holding torque/ not pull in torque. And even if you find the pull in rating, that changes with the RPM. At higher speeds, bipolar motors drop off in torque rapidly, and unipolar motors drop off as well, but not as fast (bipolar has more torque at lower speeds).

    The formula and calculator on the web site are known, tested, rules of thumb that usually work just fine.




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    i,am new to all this as i see lots of you are .i have built a 24" x 34" cnc frame i,am going to be doing guitar bodys. my ? is what size stepper motor would i need for that kid of job.go light on me.been looking on ebay for the set up but really don,t no.that is why i,am here asking the pros.thanks



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    This page:
    techref.massmind.org/techref/io/steppers.htm#Estimating Will help you estimate the combined size of the drivers, supply, and motors. It's NOT about the size of stepper /only/; its about the combination of driver, supply and motors /together/.



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What stepper motor should I use thread

What stepper motor should I use thread