Stepper skipping steps like it is it’s job


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    Default Stepper skipping steps like it is it’s job

    I have a taig mill that was skipping steps and me being me burnt up the control trying to put bigger motors on it. I didn’t know what I was doing. So I bought a kit built everything and it seemed to work well. But it still skips steps. I moved up to 425 oz motors and a 36v power supply. The mill feels smooth do binding or anything.this thing will skip steps at 5in/min which I feel is ridiculous. Also using mach2 mill. Any ideas or just comments telling me what I might have done wrong would be awesome

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    Default Re: Stepper skipping steps like it is it’s job

    Hi,
    tells us more about your steppers and drivers.

    What inductance are the steppers?
    What micro-stepping regime have you set your drives to?
    What is the max voltage capacity of your drives?
    What power supply are you using?

    Craig



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    Default Re: Stepper skipping steps like it is it’s job

    Hello.

    May I suggest you check the couplings? If your machine was running right and then it started skipping steps, that might be one cause.

    One less likely refers to the current supply. You have to remember that steppers are current motors, not voltage motors. That is, no matter how high a voltage you supply the motor it will run at the same speed. Other factors are the determining ones to turn the motors.

    Check the current settings of your drive. It might be possible to have higher setting options than the one you are set for now.

    Remember that the calibration procedure requires to run the motors at the highest possible current without compromising operation and temperature.

    From that point of view, I´d take a good look at the transmissions. That is the screw balls, gears, etc. Whatever is driving the axis you are having problems with. A stuck movement can also lead to that fault.

    I hope this helps.

    Regards.



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    Default Re: Stepper skipping steps like it is it’s job

    Quote Originally Posted by BBMNet View Post

    One less likely refers to the current supply. You have to remember that steppers are current motors, not voltage motors. That is, no matter how high a voltage you supply the motor it will run at the same speed. Other factors are the determining ones to turn the motors.

    Check the current settings of your drive. It might be possible to have higher setting options than the one you are set for now.

    Regards.
    Not entirely convinced on that one.
    I have nema 24's. Went from 36v high current to 60v with lower current and it's effectively doubled my speed.

    ctobe:
    Check couplings and also is your pc/port ok?
    I had a pc with an error the caused skipped steps on every 360 degree rotation.



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    Default Re: Stepper skipping steps like it is it’s job

    Quote Originally Posted by dazp1976 View Post
    Not entirely convinced on that one.
    I have nema 24's. Went from 36v high current to 60v with lower current and it's effectively doubled my speed.

    ctobe:
    Check couplings and also is your pc/port ok?
    I had a pc with an error the caused skipped steps on every 360 degree rotation.
    Hello.

    Assuming you are using STEP/DIR drives the following tests would be clarifying. Remember that the speed is related to the rate at which the STEP pulses are fed intro the drives.

    If changing the voltage modified your speed then it probably meant that the motor was somehow restricted. As you increased the voltage the current also increased which meant the torque was also increased.

    It is very simple to find out. Set a test program to run a square of say 10 inches per side and then measure it. Then also run a diamond of the same 10 inches per side and then again measure. Both programs should be run twice, one at low voltage and one at the high voltage. If there is any difference in the measures then the torque difference is the determining factor and thus it means that at low voltage the motor is let me say not strong enough to drive the load.

    In one of my clients machine the original SMPS failed and due to the urgence he had to complete one batch of products a linear supply using a transformer, 2 rectifier diodes and 4 electrolytic capacitors in a voltage doubler were installed instead. That was a little over a year ago. The voltage changed from 60 volts to about 45 volts unregulated varying as load changes. Even though the SMPS has been repaired the owner decided to keep the linear. No noticeable difference in operation has been detected so far.

    If you run the tests please let me know. I´m always open to learn new things and correct my ideas if proven wrong.

    Regards.



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Stepper skipping steps like it is it’s job

Stepper skipping steps like it is it’s job

Stepper skipping steps like it is it’s job