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    Default New to Solidworks

    I took a college course a year ago in Solidworks. After the class ended I converted some hand sketches to CAD drawings. I got pretty good with Solidworks but got busy at work and in my own shop. Went an entire year without using Solidworks untill this week. Have a project at work where I had hand sketches and converting thme to CAD. I'm learning Solidworks for the second time and already think I'm better than ever after short sessions in the last few days.

    I understand Solidworks is a spin off of Auto-CAD. Therefore, knowing some Auto-CAD can be helpful when learning Solidworks. Objects are drawing in 3-D (part drawing) from the beginning. Conveting to a 3-view drawing (or Orthagraphic projection) is done last.

    Assemblies are another strong point for Solidworks. What you do is open several part drawings and then click and drag them into an assembly page. Very impressive to take a pin and piece with a hole and actualy insert the pin in the hole.

    Hopefully, Solidworks users can come here and learn form each other. I have knowone to help me so I sometimes slug it out for several minutes or hours.
    Jim

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  2. #2
    WallCrawler
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    Default Cool

    Keep up the good work..




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    Registered sorincnc's Avatar
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    Jim,
    Solidworks is more of a spinoff from Solid Edge or viceversa. I have take a course on Solid Edge wile working for a large madical company and I am amazed how close these 2 programs are. I mean, down to the icons and ways of doing things.
    Regards,
    Sorin

    Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both.
    Benjamin Franklin


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    Solidworks is based on the Parasolid kernel, along with several other programs like Unigraphics and Solidedge. But in my opinion is much easier to use than either of them. I have been using it for about a year now and love it.

    Cliff



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    Registered HuFlungDung's Avatar
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    So what does Solidworks do for you when its time to make Gcode? Do they have CAM modules?



  6. #6

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    Solidworks is more than anything an outgrowth of Pro/E. The founders of Solidworks were originally employed as managers for Pro/E, and a number of them left to start a new company. The approach to modeling in both programs is very similar, although I have to say that I prefer the user interface of Solidworks over that of Pro/E.

    Knowing AutoCAD is not really much of a benefit to learning Solidworks. Solidworks is geared toward creating 3D models of your parts or assemblies using a variety of tools, including extrusions, sweeps, revolves, and the like. AutoCAD is geared mainly toward the drafting end of things, although later releases have added some limited ability to do solid modeling. The big difference, though, is that Solidworks is feature-oriented, meaning you can add, delete, and move holes, ribs, lugs, and other features of your model. AutoCAD uses a boolean approach to modeling, in which a hole is created by creating a solid describing the volume of the hole, then subtracting it from your model. The hole can't be moved except by being filled back in (which is sometimes difficult, if it intersects other holes and the like) and recreated.

    Solidworks is also parametric, so when you change your model your drawing updates itself. Dimensions in AutoCAD can be updated, but it's not an automatic process.

    As for creating g-code, you can use an add-in module that integrates with the Solidworks user interface, or you can use another program that can accept the Solidworks .sldprt file format. Virtual Gibbs is one program that several of our suppliers use, and it seems to work very well judging from the demonstrations I've seen.

    Dave


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    Yeah, everything Dave said! As far as CAM, there are Mastercam, Camworks and other plugins for Solidworks. Surfcam and others support the models as well.

    Cliff



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    I struggled with Autocad for some time...trying to remember the key codes, etc. I could make a decent drawing, but once solidworks came in to the picture, I don't want to go back. I'll use the sketch function to get quick dimensions within complicated contours when writing programs for parts that don't show the numbers I really need. I've also imported sld.prt into Partmaker cadcam (thats when PartMaker takes over) and you can disect it and get the lines/faces you need for making toolpaths very easily. One of the coolest things I did for a small race car component that I designed was I entered the density of the material in the properties, and I knew what the product would weigh well before the 1st one came off the machine. Love it.



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    Moderator JIMMY's Avatar
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    I was wondering if solidworks could be learned pretty good from a book. I don't have time to go to school right now but if I had a book at home I could get some time in for studing. I know MasterCam real good so I think I can use some of that knowledge to learn solidworks. I will go to school and learn in the near future. I would like to get a head start.

    (Note: The opinions expressed in this post are my own and are not necessarily those of CNCzone and its management)


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    Jimmy..I didnt take any courses in using Solidworks, and its been a pretty easy package to learn and use.
    The help files that come with it, along woth the breif tutorials, are more than adequate to get you up and running in a matter of hours.

    Also, ther are a number of Solidworks yahoo groups(and other misc. groups on the Internet) that can assist you in learning all that you want to know, if you are not so inclined to purchase a book or 2 on the subject.

    I started using solidworks about 2 months ago and Ive accomplished a few things, that ALL the proffesionally tought Solidworks users that Ive spoken to, have yet to figure out....creating a working assembly of a complete ballscrew that will simulate correctly without collisions, mate errors, ect......(including all ball bearings in the ballnuts,ball bearing race grooves, ball return tubes, the works)

    Up until a week ago, I could only model it utilizing threads in place of the ball bearing that an actual ballnut consists of. But with a little playing aroung in SW, I was able to figure out how to do it correctly.

    If I can figure it out, I think you(or anybody) most certainly can.



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    Moderator JIMMY's Avatar
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    Thanks CNCnUtZ,

    I have received some info on it and I will also look on the help pages. I want to thank you guys for helping.


    jimmy

    (Note: The opinions expressed in this post are my own and are not necessarily those of CNCzone and its management)


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    Default learning Solidworks

    The younger people may be able to learn Solidworks on their own.
    I tried learing it on my own and gave up. I learn best in a class room with an instructor. Getting help from co-workers after the class was also a real jump start. Been working with it for almost a month now and doing well. I need to work with it at least once a week to stay with it.
    Jim



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    Default keep it up

    Thats the only way we learn.Especially when we help
    each other. If you need anything just holler.



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    Registered Jennifer's Avatar
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    Is there a book on SolidWorks that anyone would recommend? The help files and tutorials are great, but I'd really like to be able to flip through a manual in times of need.

    Thanks

    (Note: The opinions expressed in this post are my own and are not necessarily those of CNCzone and its management)


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    Question SolidWorks

    Hi Guys
    Reading with intertest your discussion on Solidworks.
    I myself have been using it for just over two years after many years of AutoCad R10 onwards.
    I would be loathed to return to autocad which is stoneage in comparison.

    Solidworkws I believe is compatible with most CAM software titles.
    As far as I can remember( correct me if I am wrong) you can save your files with an *.iges file extension and allows models to be transferred to Mastercam, Excalibur etc for g-code generation.

    I get the impression that some of you guys are using Solidworks at home or your own small hobby workshops.

    How much does Solidworks retail for in USA, here in UK it costs pennies short of about about £4000 ( $6400 US)

    Is that what you guys pay for it or it there another way of getting your hands on a copy,
    for example here in UK you can pick up a pirated copy of Autocad 2002 for about £100 ($160 US) if you know where to look

    By the way, if there are any SOLIDWORKS or AUTOCAD policemen out there I would never condone software privacy !!!!!!
    just interested to hear if anyone has any opinions on the subject

    Regards jtrav



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    Default Solid works cost

    Hi jtrav

    We use Solidworks where I work and took a college course in Solidworks as well.

    There is a student version that costs $250 US. The software crashes, somehow, after 2 years from date of purchase.

    A single seat of software is around $1500 . Solidworks upgrades every year or so. I would assume upgrades would be less than a new copy.

    Did you say $6500 for Solidworks??

    It is the only CAD I know. I wish I could use it everyday instead of relearning it every 3 months.

    Jim



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    Default

    Take a look at xxxxxxxxxxxxx and download the emule program. After installing xxxxxxx, perform a xxxxxxxx, you will be able to download xxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxx

    Last edited by WallCrawler; 07-04-2003 at 08:23 AM.


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    Jennifer,

    Try opamp.com they have all type of technical books.
    Solidworks, Mastercam,ProE, Autocad,Surfcam, etc.
    a very complete book store.

    Best Regards,

    GOMEZ 107



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    Default solid works $6500

    Jimglass

    My apologies for mis informing you on price.

    Our company deals with a local software company who sell on behalf of Solid works.
    The price we paid include some of the features such as technical help subscrition, photoworks and the toolbox package which is really nice, gives realistic 3d reprentations of screws fastners etc. We also got the Solid works Office tools which to be honest I haven't used yet so I am not sure what it includes, maybe that is why the price was so high.

    Did your price include anything other than the basic package?

    I agree with your last sentiment I wish I could use it every day
    We have 3 seats for the 5 people in dept where I work.
    Its occasionally embarasiing to watch grown men racing each other across the floor to "dive into" a recently vacated seat



  20. #20
    Registered Jennifer's Avatar
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    Gomez107-

    Thanks - I'll look into it.

    Jen

    (Note: The opinions expressed in this post are my own and are not necessarily those of CNCzone and its management)


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