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  1. #13
    Registered Pplug's Avatar
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    Artcam and Aspire are very similar. I think they were worked on by the same programmer. At their core I think they do the same thing, 2.5D work. I am currently running Artcam but I think I will switch to Aspire once my copy of AC becomes outdated. $2G compared to $7.5G..... I'll learn a new software program to save $5.5G!

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    Default Re: ArtCAM substitute?

    Type3 Software develops TYPE EDIT for CNC and LASERTYPE for Laser machines since 1988, and this always been a good alternative to ArtCam and Aspire.
    Pricewise it is placed in between, features wise and power wise it is way beyond those two.
    It is used in big corporate around the world such as Honda, Goodyear, Boeing... or governmental such as The US Mint, but also in small shops around the world.
    You can check them out at Type3: Global leader for CAD & CAM Software Solutions | Type3

    https://www.youtube.com/user/Type3Software



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    Default Re: ArtCAM substitute?

    Rhino V3, V4, V5 user, here.

    Forgive my ignorance, but what do you guys mean by "2.5D"?

    I use Rhino for 2D linework for my LASER-Engraver (exported as DXF), and for 3D Jewelry designs (intricate small pieces with bezels, galleries, etc. and in this case, once I'm done with the model, it's exported into STL and either carved into resin on a CNC-Mill, or grown into resin on EnvisionTec, Asiga, or FormLabs 3D-Printers).

    Once I know what you guys mean, I can tell you how Rhino would go about creating stuff like that.



  4. #16
    Community Moderator ger21's Avatar
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    Default Re: ArtCAM substitute?

    2.5D can mean different things to different people.
    But, what I think he's referring to, is 3D reliefs.
    Basically, one sided 3D models. Like this:
    http://www.vectric.com/cool-stuff/ga...bass-scene.jpg

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  5. #17
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    Default Re: ArtCAM substitute?

    Thank you for clarifying, now I understand.

    Well, if I were tasked to design that using only Rhino, there are a few ways I could go about it, but the best would probably be Network Surfaces, or one Surface Edit.

    If I did a Surface:
    1. I'd use the PictureFrame command to put up a sized-to-scale photo of the basrelief in the background of the top viewport. Lock it so that it won't move.
    2. draw a plane that covers the general area where the basrelief is.
    3. turn on the Control Points to see how many points in your surface (a basic surface plane just has the four corner points).
    4. use the Rebuild command and add as many control points as you will need to edit based on the complexity of the design.
    5. Now when you turn on the control points you will see a multitude of points on your plane instead of just the four corners.
    6. Select the points that correspond to 'raised' areas of your bas-relief, and pull them away from the surface on the top viewport.
    7. repeat until the surface generally resembles the basics of what the picture looks like (use Ghosted Viewport to see 'through' your surface and into the back photo).
    8. Extrude your surface outwards, thus creating a solid with your surface-edited plane as a face.
    9. If you need more detail, create Network Surfaces, Spheres, Ellipsoids, etc. Use the BooleanDifference command to remove from the solid, the areas where you need detail.
    10. Once you're completely done, use this new solid as your BooleanDifference from another design solid. Now that solid will have a bas-relief 2.5D 'pocket' created by BooleanDifferencing your modified surface from it.

    Admittedly, this method is slow. Another method is to create linework and create many many network surfaces that overlap, then framing them with the proposed solid and dropping a straight pocket down until it meets the network surface contours. Then, BooleanUnion everything.

    There are a number of approaches, these are just two. But they are time-consuming. You can probably try "Heightfield from Image" but I've never been successful at using an image to generate topographical surfaces, so that's a hit-or-miss.

    The beauty here is that all of the surfaces you create in Rhino would be fully developable/editable either by using their control points, or (in the case with Network Surfaces), pulling their parent lines' editing points.



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ArtCAM substitute?

ArtCAM substitute?