Is Machining a Good career to get into? - Page 2


View Poll Results: Would it be a good idea to get into machining?

Voters
82. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes

    68 82.93%
  • No

    14 17.07%
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 13 to 19 of 19

Thread: Is Machining a Good career to get into?

  1. #13
    Registered moriboy1's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    44
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Default Is Machining a Good career to get into?

    Quote Originally Posted by jm82792 View Post
    I'm 21, I had an interest in CNC machines early in my teens, and I bought a small machine when I was 18. I continue to wonder what I'll do for work since the economy isn't great, and getting a decent job isn't easy. What I did is I kept this interest of mine going, making a few bucks on the way, and I've kept college/education going.

    Perhaps you could pursue some form of education, work in what interests you, and see which one pans out or perhaps both if your degree/certificate/etc works with your interest,
    For me I'm making a decent bit selling specialized wood work, then I have my father's occasional work, and then (lots of testing out then online college) college which I'm loathing but must finish since I'm 35 credits from my bachelors in boring business
    Hopefully I get the first option, if not the second might keep me somewhat going (not really as contracting is basically dead), or conversely I could push papers....
    I'm definitely not making bank selling things but it's actually shaping up decently and maybe it will go somewhere. Perhaps if you keep your interest well fed and wait some then you can get an idea of what is best for you.
    I think you are doing things the right way. My son (senior in high school) wants to work in our shop once he gets out of HS. No problem by me, but I am dead set on him getting an education in either business or finance first. Then come back and get dirty for as long as you want. Running machines and making things can be rewarding, but understanding money and how to make it work for you is something that most of us (including me) don't have a clue about. To answer the OPs question: Yes, I think machining can be a wonderful career. Our business has supported our family (and many employees and their family's) since WW2.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk



  2. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    123
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Default Re: Is Machining a Good career to get into?

    As far as not liking production I can relate to that.
    You are in luck that many aerospace machine shops and customers are really progressing towards JIT(just in time) deliveries which means shorter production runs.
    I have been in the manufacturing industry 29 years and have never been out of work.
    In my experience, being a machinist usually entails 48-60 hour work weeks in a busy shop. Plus shift work.
    I recommend looking at Cnc programming as a full time career. The work varies from day to day. I personally have worked for $28-70+ dollars/hr in my programming career. I started programming with Mastercam in the earl 90's and have since moved in to Catia/Delmia which commands premium salary. The down side is I have to move from time to time to be near the large aerospace companies that use Catia.
    I think the manufacturing industry as a whole is under staffed which means the future looks bright for continued employment.

    I wish you much luck in your decision.
    Rob


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk



  3. #15
    Gold Member dertsap's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    canada
    Posts
    4233
    Downloads
    1
    Uploads
    0

    Default Re: Is Machining a Good career to get into?

    Is it a good career choice ?? yes/no/maybe ? That would depend upon the individual and what they'd perceive is a good career choice .
    The key to being successful and always employed in machining is to be versatile , don't get yourself locked into mastering only a portion of the field /job market . Aerospace , oil , mining and forestry for example are always up and down , then theres mind numbing production work . Each and every field takes its punches . So learn as much as you can at one place then move on to the next . The shops have to adjust to change or they collapse , and many of them do (either or) . As an employee you need to know where you can jump to when you need to , and hopefully you can get to a point that a simple phone call is all that it takes to make a move .Over time you'll meet and work with people who will spread out , and if you pay attention then you'll already know your next move before you need to take it.
    The biggest mistakes that I've seen over the years are from the guys who move forward and are never willing to look back . The mistake is thinking that they are above all that . Deburring and all the crap work that goes along with the parts is the nature of the beast and I've heard it too many times " I don't do that crap , thats for the labourers to do " . There are stepping stones to learning this trade , and each time you step over one them stones - pick it up and carry it because you will need it again in the future
    Now , the passion of making things is a whole other story . It's always a great feeling to make something with passion , pride and a sense of accomplishment .
    But , lets say job shops for example , most times we are faced with drawings for a single part/component that we don't know what its for , the company doesn't know or care what its for , and we are simply there to make the parts and get them out . Lots of parts are nickle and dime brain dead stuff , some stuff is interesting and other parts are just outright frightening . Stuff happens and the thought of scrapping a part that is in 6 figures is pretty nerve wracking , I've seen big guys who were falling short of showing tears . The rewards are there once those parts successfully come off of the machine , and until then there is much needed focus
    On the other hand , there are a lot of cool and interesting markets out there , its just a matter of finding them . If you get into machining then you'll see it everywhere , because everywhere you go there will probably be something thats been machined , and of course you'll then analyze it .
    Cash wise the wages aren't bad , but when I compare the skill set involved with machining in comparison to most other trades , then theres a gap and we are on the wrong side of it as employees , shop owners have to pick and choose their own battles as well because machinery etc isn't cheap .

    Is it a good career choice ? Yes/No , for those who have the right mind set it might be . I had a lot of opportunities in my youth and I've been doing this for over 20 years , I still ask myself " was this really a good career choice"

    A poet knows no boundary yet he is bound to the boundaries of ones own mind !! ........


  4. #16
    Registered
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    China
    Posts
    0
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Default Re: Is Machining a Good career to get into?

    Many people choose to take the positive attitude about this question. Whether it good or not, actually it all depends on yourself, how do you look at? or do you have some interests in machine? Because as I known, interests is the good teacher to do everything. Love the things what you do, and do the things what you love. So that's my suggestions for you, the choice is up to you.

    ISweek(http://www.isweek.com/)- Industry sourcing & Wholesale industrial products


  5. #17
    Registered
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    15
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Default Re: Is Machining a Good career to get into?

    It pays the bills!! Get with a good company and the business will look after you.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk



  6. #18
    Registered brass00's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    3
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Default Re: Is Machining a Good career to get into?

    Yes, as long as you are good at it.



  7. #19
    Member Bob La Londe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1927
    Downloads
    2
    Uploads
    0

    Default Re: Is Machining a Good career to get into?

    Quote Originally Posted by brass00 View Post
    Yes, as long as you are good at it.
    ... or can make the opportunities to GET good at it.

    Bob La Londe
    http://www.YumaBassMan.com


Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


About CNCzone.com

    We are the largest and most active discussion forum for manufacturing industry. The site is 100% free to join and use, so join today!

Follow us on


Our Brands

Is Machining a Good career to get into?

Is Machining a Good career to get into?

Is Machining a Good career to get into?