Who works in manufacturing. programming or machining - Page 4


View Poll Results: Who works in manufacturing, machinist or programer, both

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  • I do it all, program, setup and run a CNC machine daily.

    937 66.45%
  • I setup & run a machine, but I dont do much/any programming.

    95 6.74%
  • All I do is program CNC machines.

    147 10.43%
  • Im into CNC as hobby right now. It is not how I earn a living.

    259 18.37%
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Thread: Who works in manufacturing. programming or machining

  1. #37
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    I started machining about 2 years ago at a linear motion manufacture as an operator on cnc lathes. I now set up,program, and operate up to 6 machines(Omni-Turn, Miyano LZ 1 and 2, and Deawoo Puma 300). All are Fanuc control which I program the long way, by hand. I don't think we do difficult parts to any seasoned machinist but it has really help me understand the basics. I have a good nember of co-workers to help me along with my quest too. I mostly face-turn-bore and groove aluminum and stainless steel. I found this site by looking to further my own knowledge of cnc on my own time. Looks like I have found a great wealth of knowledge here and look forward to learning alot.
    Thanks for your time,
    Jared



  2. #38
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    Default Machine Shop Manager/Programmer

    I started out in '78 as a Chip Sweeper in a ballbearing plant. Ended up working on New Britian and Conomatic screw machines, until the company filed for bankrupcy, due to increased imports. I didn't get into CNC work until 1985 working on Traub Turning Centers. Then I worked for 10 years as a toolmaker using a Maho doing Die work until the plant moved to Mexico. Now I manage a shop with 4 fadals and 6 machinists.
    I want to go back to sweeping chips next, but I can't pay my bills that way anymore.



  3. #39
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    I am a female who did not get into this field until college. I was majoring in Drafting and Design, wanted to be a residential designer, I had a teacher that saw my true interests, he was saving the "shop" program. When I started all he had was a CNC router table and a computer in a small room. One year later he had that router, a CNC plasma cutter, a HAAS mill and lathe amoung other countless manual machines. I had a blast learning. I program now for a machine shop (CNC lathes and mills and waterjets) doing government work using Mastercam, Fabriwin, Omax, and Solidworks(<-fun!!). I also do process travelers and engineer flat patterns for sheet metal parts. My biggest problem is finding a job close to where I live. I travel over 60 miles each way to work everyday. I live in the city and work in the country! The way gas prices are now I wish I could find something closer!



  4. #40
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    I worked in the tool/mold industry and completed a 4yr apprenticeship.Have been running/programming horizontal and veritical mills for about 12 yrs now.I do my own setups and about fifty percent of the programming is right off the prints.Its all 2d work and every job is different.I use a lot of user macros to do repetitive tasks.We have just gotten camworks so I wont be doing much mdi programming anymore.I found this site by accident and am interested in building a cnc router/mill. I have the programming skills and the machining background and also do a lot of woodworking and have a decent shop in my garage.What I dont have is the electronic background and the skill set that goes with it.I'm amazed at what I have seen on this sight and the can do attitude of the members here.Its very inspiring.



  5. #41
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    I started out tearing things apart and trying to see what made them tick. Not always worried about getting them back together. Unless of course it belonged to my Father! Heheh! Having a compulsive bit of intrigue on anything mechanical or electro-mechanical I found all shop classes a big play ground for a young mind. Between the shiny machines, precision instruments, electronics projects and reading about making R/C engines, I was hooked.

    In some form or another, I have always been in manufacturing.

    1 yr part time in a Heat Treat Plant to support my first car!
    1 yr burr bench, chip technician
    4 yrs at a sweat shop cranking manual handles on mills and lathes.
    6 yrs in Steel Wire products plant (otherwise known as Hell on earth)
    4 yrs of night school to get a 2 yr AA degree in Electronics/Robotics
    5 yrs in a FAA Prop Overhaul Facility.
    3 1/2 yrs in a Thermal Form Plastics shop as a Tool Maker/Maintenance
    1 yr of Community College for AutoCAd, Production tooling, and Job Shop quoting.
    5 yrs OEM CNC Field Service Machine Tool Tech.
    6 yrs to date as a Machine designer/Tool Maker/Maint. Tech.




    This all lead me to my current position, which is as a Machine Designer/Tool Maker/Machine Tool Technician, one of which could change at any given moment without the convenience of a telephone booth! Not much different than industrial process engineering?

    My main function is to design machines and tooling for secondary production processes by Blind employees. It is by far one of the finest facilities, with the kindest people I have ever had the honor to work with. There rarely seems to be a limit on the technology I get to play around with that supports our main goals. This is my 6th year and I really enjoy what I am doing. It is an awesome blend to get to draw my design for an assembly in AutoCad or Solidworks, program it via CAM or conversational to the machine, then make it come to life with mechanical, electronics and software developed to give a level of independence to the operator.

    A true waste of hard earned skills would be by not passing them on to someone else.

    I have my own well equiped shop at home for side jobs and hobby stuff.

    DC

    Last edited by One of Many; 09-11-2005 at 01:54 PM.


  6. #42
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    Default Funny Start

    It's funny how I got started in the machining industry.

    I had worked construction for a company that also had a manufacturing facility that made the freezer panels that I installed. Well there had been some talk about moving the buisness about 45min away and we had actually cleaned up a place for the manufacturing buisness to move but was not supposed to move for a little under a year. Over memorial day weekend we came back to work and found that all the equipment was moved without even telling me they were going to move it. The boss said he would give me a buck an hour raise if I went down to work for him I said "no". So I agreed to stay a couple of days to clean up but that was it. So that day I looked in the employment section of the paper and noticed that there were several "cnc" jobs, I had no idea what they were but they paid well, so I went for it.

    After some talk to people they said the best bet for me is to start out at a trade school, so I did. The schooling covered all the basics including autocad and I found my self facinated with the whole process, so much so that I went on to a local college to get an AA in Computer Aided Manufacturing(like an AA in mechanical basically)

    Now I am a plant engineer for a machine shop in the great state of Kansas. I love my job and my career choice and have never looked back. I love a good challenge and I get that everyday at work.

    Here's to life and the choices we make



  7. #43
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    I am 5 yrs out of college, and never get to use the CNC machines at work. I design rubber extrusion dies for an automotive manufacturer, but the closest I get to the cnc process is making the models in AutoCAD, Inventor Catia and Solidworks. I envy the guys that get to use the tools, so I'm gonna try my hand at building some. Not looking for a career change, just to broaden my horizons and learn about electronics and motion control. I have no idea what i will do with my machine once I am done, but my 3 yr old is thrilled that i'm making a robot. It won't quite be what she expects in the end, I am sure.... maybe I'll use the mill to build parts for something a little more 'interactive'...



  8. #44
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    Thumbs up CNC setting and programming

    Hello,
    Dont know if anyone will read this:
    I did a 4 year apprenticeship in Australia on CNC Lathes, Mills and mechanical porduction lathes.
    I know programming for a few controllers like FANUC and OKUMA, and am underway on building a cnc lathe and mill of my own both with auto turrets.
    still a little research on the internet to go yet.
    But if there is anything you need working out, please dont hesitate to contact me at: rhino@acenet.net.au



  9. #45
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    I took machine shop in vo-tech started running punch presses straight out of school. Moved up to CNC operator in a couple years. Now a couple years later I program CNC mills and a Laser. I still get to run the good old machines from time to time (not as often as I would like to). Right now I'm working on getting a VF6, minimill and gantry mill in here. I also do maintanance on the laser, Nitrogen generator and air compressor.



  10. #46
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    I just got my first job in the industry a few weeks ago, first few days they put me on a CNC router, then a few days ago operating on a milling centre. Needless to say my school training helped where my total lack of experience (I thought) would've been a problem. So far so good.



  11. #47
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    I'm New To Your Site,
    I Find It Very Interesting, Purchased A Machine For Home Use, Finally.
    32 Years C.n.c. Machining, Vertical, Horizontal, And Lathes. I Program At The Control. (fanuc,okuma,mitsubishi,boss,fadal,general Numerics[old],yasnac,haas).



  12. #48
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    Hrm, well. I started manuals. Drills, mills, & lathes for about 12 years. I mainly have been on the larger machines. Went to CNC's in mid 90's. Programming from path trace to master cam. Now I lean more towards the mamagement side. Controlling the master production schedule from sales to out the door. It's alot harder to get people to do the work than it is to just run the parts yourself. However, upper management frowns on the fact that I still will crank handles or program mdi for faster cycle times. Machining is the most under appreciated trade out there. Sad but true.



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