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  1. #1
    Registered HuFlungDung's Avatar
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    Default learning to model

    Mlinder and I were having this discussion off the forums (forgive us, Paul G ) so I thought it would do more good to try to carry this on in public because I know there are experienced users out there who can clue us "2d'ers" in on doing 3d stuff.

    Subject: Mill eXPert Join function (Mlinder)

    Anyway, I have been poking around the program and learning what I can without a manual. Coming soon, I’m told.

    One of the first things I noticed was the lack of a Join function within the Translate dialog. It was shown in the Tutorial, but not available in the actual program. I contacted Mike about it, and Australia simply removed that function. I notice now in this new patch, that even the tutorial has been revised, so that now one must translate the geometry, then join each and every entity individually. This is a bit backward, don’t you think? Not that I use that function very often, but I do use it (in my 2D program, MasterCAM Router).

    HFD's reply

    Yes, I noticed that discrepancy between the tutorial and the way things actually were. Maybe it was a buggy function?

    In most cases, can you not accomplish more by using the extruded surface function to do the translation? This way you end up with a solid, and there is no need to fool around making surfaces on the sides you are joining?

    Mlinder
    That's what I did - just use extrude. The only thing is extrude doesn't seem to extrude holes (360 degree arcs). Maybe I'm missing something there.

    Similar Threads:
    First you get good, then you get fast. Then grouchiness sets in.

    (Note: The opinions expressed in this post are my own and are not necessarily those of CNCzone and its management)


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    Registered HuFlungDung's Avatar
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    I am just in the midst of playing around with this aspect and there seem to be a couple of different approaches.

    First, forget about drawing your arcs to represent holes to start with. Just plot a point where you intend for the hole to be, and then get right in to the 2d surface tools or 3d solids functions.

    In 2d, you can "create a surface" using circular plane and then create that surface to represent your 2d holes. It is quick and easy to select arc centers using your existing points.

    But why even bother, just go straight into 3d solid, and create a cylinder immediately on those same points. Then, just use the solid cutter to cut the holes from the existing surface. Don't forget to blank or delete the "plugs" from the holes or it will still look filled in when you render it.

    First you get good, then you get fast. Then grouchiness sets in.

    (Note: The opinions expressed in this post are my own and are not necessarily those of CNCzone and its management)


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    Registered mlinder's Avatar
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    HU,

    Thanks for your ideas.

    Your solution to adding holes is perfect and simple. (I guess I am always looking for the hard way).

    I look forward to reading your evaluations of the program and your solutions to various processes.

    Have a good weekend.

    Mark



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    Registered mlinder's Avatar
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    HU,

    I went into solids and created a cylinder. It works OK, except the function isn't modal. Gets to be a bit cumbersome when there are many holes, but hey, ya just can't have everything, right?

    Mark



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    Registered HuFlungDung's Avatar
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    Well Mark, hopefully by discussing these issues honestly and openly in public, we can bring attention to CAD tools we still need, such as what you described.

    A "repeat last function" would be handy as heck. Hopefully this could somehow even be put onto one of the mouse buttons, or wheel up or wheel down or something, since all the rest of the mouse buttons seem to be spoken for. But, I'd settle for any hotkey for the function as well.

    edit: oops, the mouse wheel already has a function too: zooms in and out

    Last edited by HuFlungDung; 04-18-2003 at 03:38 PM.
    First you get good, then you get fast. Then grouchiness sets in.

    (Note: The opinions expressed in this post are my own and are not necessarily those of CNCzone and its management)


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    For what its worth, In mill proff extrude curves is modal and you can extrude arcs. Just pick extrude curves, make sure you get an arrow of direction left click and then right click. I don't see why you would do this unless for visual purposes as you can't drill them from the solid model and if you don't plug them, when you cut model, the tool will want to go into the holes.

    Ken

    Last edited by Mortek; 04-18-2003 at 02:48 PM.


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    Registered HuFlungDung's Avatar
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    Good observation there Ken, about the tool dropping into the holes (if they are large enough). Hence, it would be a good idea to keep the "solid plugs" by blanking them rather than deleting them, in case you need them back

    I haven't figured out yet if there is a practical advantage to actually modelling the holes yet. I'm figuring the more practise I get, the better I'll be.

    I found the same type of thing about scripting when using Bobcad: you can't jump right in to the complex stuff if you don't get practised up on what's dead easy to start with.

    First you get good, then you get fast. Then grouchiness sets in.

    (Note: The opinions expressed in this post are my own and are not necessarily those of CNCzone and its management)


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