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  1. #49
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    I mean how I cancalculate the spring

    Thanks



  2. #50
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    First, you need to esimate the weight of everything that will be supported by the springs. In my case, I needed to support aproximately 400lbs. My local hardware store had a variety of springs availabe with a 1" diameter, so that seemed like a good place to start. The softer springs had a rate of 40lbs/inch and the stiffer springs had a rate of 150lbs/inch. Using lower rate springs would yeild a larger amplitude, and the higher rate springs made for a smaller amplitude. I played around with it a little bit, and seemed to get better results using the higher rate springs coupled with a faster speed on the axle.



  3. #51
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    Hello all. I own a small sheet metal shop in NC. I have used various vibratory tumblers over the years when I was punching a time clock.
    The time has come to make one for my shop. I have secured two junk gas cylinders (free) from the local gas co. A 100# and 150#, one of these will be the tub. The 100#er is pictured below.
    http://www.mantank.com/products/stee...ane/50-100.htm

    A buddy will be giving me a 3HP 220V motor. I believe 1 HP would be fine but the 3 is free. I'll make the frame. The only thing I haven't sorted is the tub lining. One place I worked many yrs ago "painted" on some sort of urethane. I have not been able to find anything like that yet.

    Nice work Unabiker. Thanks for sharing all the info.

    BTW. Did you say your axle is 1"? Looks bigger. -ted


    .



  4. #52
    Registered mxtras's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ted383 View Post
    The only thing I haven't sorted is the tub lining. One place I worked many yrs ago "painted" on some sort of urethane. I have not been able to find anything like that yet.
    A spray in bed liner would be an effective option.

    Scott

    Consistency is a good thing....unless you're consistently an idiot.


  5. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unabiker View Post
    I need to take some shots of my stuff before and after finishing, and after they come back from anodizing so you'll have an idea of the finish quality I'm getting.
    Yes, you do!

    Got any?

    Scott

    Consistency is a good thing....unless you're consistently an idiot.


  6. #54
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    Finaly, here are some pics.....
    This is a batch of radiator guards ready to come off of the machine. I'm cutting using an Onsrud single flute cutter at 17,500 rpm traveling at 85 ipm, using a water-based Cool Mist mister.



    This is one of the pieces after bending. Edge finish is not terrible, but it does need some de-burring.



    After about 30 minutes of swimming in the shaker. My goal is for an even finish with no harsh edges. With a full load of media in the tub, I do 6 of these pieces at a time.



    Here is what they look like after anodizing.




    Here are a couple shots of the guards mounted up on bikes, ready for crashing...





    You can see all the different stuff I make at www.Unabiker.com



  7. #55
    Registered mxtras's Avatar
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    Very nice products!

    Scott

    Consistency is a good thing....unless you're consistently an idiot.


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    Thumbs up

    excellent work - very impressive. I was wondering how you hold your parts down. It looks like double sided adhesive on chipboard or mdf. We do something similar with our sheet metal parts but find it a little time consuming and tricky to release them without bending the parts. Any tips? Also from your experience have you any recommendations as to which grades of aluminium anodise well?

    Cheers,

    Neil



  9. #57
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    My hold-down technique has evolved over the years.
    In the beginning, I was spraying down the back side of the aluminum with 3M Super 77 adhesive and gluing it to the sacrificial board. Once everything was cut, I would heat up the aluminum with a torch, which would cause the spray adhesive to release. Then everything had to go into a parts washer. The results were acceptable, but the process was a pain in the ass, and it made my shop smell like a meth lab.
    My current method involves no glue. I have a 3/4" MDF sacrificial board on the top of the machine held in place by 18 countersunk 1/4" bolts. This board gets surfaced as needed to maintain a +/- .007" flatness. I have to do this once or twice a week, depending on humidity fluctuations and the amount of stuff I'm running. This board gets replaced about every 3 or 4 months.
    For the actual hold-down technique, first, I put 8 holes in the scrap areas in each 4'x4' section. After that, I run 3/4" drywall screws through those holes. These screws serve to keep the aluminum from moving around while cutting. I made a system that has (2) 2" steel tubes attached to the gantry that roll on either side of the cutting bit. These tubes are spring loaded to provide downward pressure on the aluminum. All of the parts are connected to the sheet by 3 or 4 .020" thick tabs per part. After each run, the parts are clipped off of the sheet with a pair of tin snips and the tabs are buzzed off on with a disk sander. All scrap, both sheet chunk scraps and chips are collected once a month and sold to a local metal recycling company. The proceeds normaly cover a month's worth of race entry fees and an occasional set of tires for the bike.
    As far as aluminum that anodizes well...I cut all my parts from 6061-T4 and make my rods from 6061-T6. I think the grade of aluminum doesn't really matter much...it all anodizes fairly well, as long as it is not cast aluminum. For cast aluminum, powdercoating is the way to go.



  10. #58
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    Thanks for the tips regarding the grades of aluminium. The roller idea to prevent the sheet from lifting while machining is interesting. Looking at the before and after anodizing photos the two finished ones look to have an even and flawless finish. Close up is the finish as good as it looks in the photos after just 30 mins of duburring? I ask because my application is a cosmetic one and I require as close to a flawless finish as possible. I'm seriously considering building something similar. At the moment we outsource to a vibratory polishing shop but the batch costs are quite high and it's a process I'd be happy to bring in house for quality control. They're also a vibratory machines and consumables supplier so I shouldn't have too much trouble obtaining media. Would it be possible for you to take a close up of the finished anodized part that shows the surface finish, if convenient of course.

    Thanks once again,

    Neil



  11. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by mxtras View Post
    A spray in bed liner would be an effective option.

    Scott
    The purpose of the liner is to suppress noise and keep the parts from banging into the tub. I think bed liner would be too hard. Plus the inside of a tumbler is a pretty hash environment, I doubt it would hold up. -ted

    .



  12. #60
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    interesting read!



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