New Machine Build Yep another newbie lol


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  1. #1
    Member mcunningham25's Avatar
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    Default Yep another newbie lol

    Hi all I am putting together my build list and need some input. I dont have a clue how to determine if I am going to be under powered or over kill on my motors and I also need some advice on the board vs HMI. I am planning on running Mach 3 on my HMI (windows xp) to my XHC MK6 motion controller/breakout board. I have Fusion 360 and love it. I am told it works fine with Mach 3 and that my XP HMI will work as long as I am going through the MK6 board. Any feed back on this or does anyone have any experience with the XHC MK6 board? I am building a 5 axis with the option to add a 6th later. The kit I am looking at has the NEMA 34 motors but the NM to oz. in stuff is greek to me. It says the motors are 13.0nm (1841 oz. in.) powered by 350W 60V 5.9A power supplies. I think this is plenty or maybe overkill but would love some feed back on that too. The basics on the design are 1500x1000x400 on the 3 axis with a 6 bearing 4 rail (2 top bearings on each of the 2 top rails and one bearing riding on bottom rails to help stabilize the gantry more giving 3 points of contact per side for the gantry rather than just the top rails alone). I plan on running one motor for the 400 mm Z axis, one motor for the 1000 mm Y axis (possibly mounted on the back of the gantry and belt driven to the front), and dual motors on the 1500 mm X axis. The A and B will come later and will probably be using NEMA 23 or 24 motors. The primary use is milling aluminum but it will see some stainless and mild steel as well. The spindle is a 2.2kw liquid cooled. I hope I am describing this all in a way some of you can picture it. This is my first time posting on here and I am not sure how to post pics yet or I would so that everyone had a better idea of what I am saying. Any and all advice is appreciated. I just want to know I am on the right track before I get everything and find out I should have asked first lol Thanks all Cheers!

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07FYCWT62...v_ov_lig_dp_it

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01LXTLZ0P...v_ov_lig_dp_it

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B06X6HF32W...v_ov_lig_dp_it

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Yep another newbie lol

    From your description, it sounds like you're planning to use 3 rails per side of your machine. This won't be easy to get set up; it's hard enough to align 2 rails perfectly.

    Wait until your frame is finished before shopping for electronics and motors. These things tend to evolve as they're being built, and you don't want to be stuck with stuff you can't use. The extra time will allow you to decipher the "Greek" and learn about other factors besides holding torque - inductance, for instance,, is one which can severely limit performance.

    If you do a great job on this, you might be able to get acceptable results on aluminum, although you'd have better luck with a fixed bridge/moving table design rather than a moving gantry.. Steel is much less likely, and stainless milling just isn't going to happen on a gantry router. That spindle is all wrong for materials like that .- too fast and not enough torque.

    Andrew Werby
    https://computersculpture.com/


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    Member peteeng's Avatar
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    Default Re: Yep another newbie lol

    Hi MC2 - As Awery says, if you are designing a Mill then the spindle is wrong and a gantry machine is not the go. You need to do more research on what a Mill is. Find a 1500x1000mm mill and see what it looks like its the size of a reasonable room and weighs many many tonnes. It is like this for a reason... Peter



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    Default Re: Yep another newbie lol

    If metal machining is the intended use,you would do better to find a mill and start from there.Or even an older machining centre that needs new control hardware.It is far from easy to build an accurate 5 axis machine as the rotational axes need to have a point of intersection and be exactly parallel to the X or Y and Z.You also need to be certain that they can be accurately homed as well.If the machine was only intended for foam it would be a lot easier.

    You will also need to calibrate the distance from a datum tool length to the pivot point of the fifth axis (which has to be identical to the distance to the pivot of the fourth axis) and then you need to ensure that the machine or the CAM system will allow you to vary that dimension if the tool you are using is shorter or longer.It might not work well to assume that a toolsetter will be enough to overcome this as the tool projection that enables fairly deep cuts with a 12mm tool would leave a 3mm tool very long and flexible.

    It could be a lengthy and absorbing project;it could also be a frustrating disaster.



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    Default Re: Yep another newbie lol

    Well after reading all the advice Im really questioning the design now but I was thinking doing 4 rails two top and two bottom for a 4 corner coverage knowing that simple top rail gantry would need more rigidity for doing metals so I wanted to run traditional top rail 2 bearing design with the addition of a third or even fourth bottom rail and bearing for added support and rigidity. I planned on building the entire frame and table out of extruded. I need something that can build my smaller parts 15 to 50 mm diameter bayonet style adapters for electrical connections but also wanted something I could use to machine racing heads for LS engines. The 5 axis is needed for my small parts as well as for heads. Now I am thinking maybe I need to build two different machines but I would like to fig out how to do both on one.



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    Default Re: Yep another newbie lol

    How do I attach pics to the thread? And thank you all for the feed back!



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    Default Re: Yep another newbie lol

    Hi MC2 - Sounds like you need to find a good contract machine shop vs making machines. Adding more rails does not improve rigidity per se. You have to add structure and that's the catch. The things you are describing require huge amounts of rigidity. Just look for machines that do the things you want to do and you will see that your concepts and the reality are universes apart. Its really easy to get things contract made and ultimately maybe cheaper then the time and trial and error involved in the trajectory you have choosen. I've been designing machinery for over 30 years and I can see a years solid design work in what you are talking about before anything can happen. I encourage you to keep making, perhaps scale down to a beginner machine first. Many great engineers and machine makers built a small machine, then used that to build a bigger machine then that to build the biggest machine etc. That's actually a faster development route then trying to design a big complex machine out of the box. Peter

    crawl, walk, run, fly, 5 axis



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    Default Re: Yep another newbie lol

    Hi Peter, Yes I am quickly figuring that all out. I first started off wanting to buy the pocket NC mini machine but they were back ordered so far I decided to look at building my own. I did look into having and was having my parts made up from a shop but the cost vs quality was just not worth it. So I decided to look at building my own. I think its a good idea for me to first build a much smaller table top unit and go from there.



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Yep another newbie lol

Yep another newbie lol

Yep another newbie lol