Casting Engine Parts

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  1. #1
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    Default Casting Engine Parts

    Hallo,ever since i started making JetTurbines i always used a lathe to make the parts,but i seen that some ppl are casting the parts,i dont know what is better.
    how did they made this part?

    sand casting or what?
    can some one point me to some links about casting like that,and how much does it going to cost me to start casting like them?
    Ofcruse ill use Inconel 713(btw does any one know wheres the best place to buy it?)
    thanks

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    If you mean at home, no, I think it can't be done. Inconel melts at about 1400°C. Many people cast aluminum (lots of info here ) which requires half the temperature. You could e.g. cast the diffuser. But then you would have to machine it to tolerances, so why not machine it from stock?



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    Hi there,

    Those turbine blades are investment cast. I went to a small factory where they make these engines a few years ago and saw all their equipment. I'm not too clued up on the correct naming, but the casting is done in a machine where the mold is spun around (centripetal force) in order to get the metal into all the little corners. The machine was quike nifty. You basically stick the (solid) metal in and the ceramic mold and it makes the wheel (well, almost...). I do know that you need to be careful of bubbles that can potentially weaken the wheel.

    I hope this helps.

    Warren

    Have a nice day...


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    It is called centrifugal (spelling?) casting. It is usally done on investment type castings. I have done it using lead and lead alloys. The molds are round with a center sprue hole with runners going out. Sort of like a wagon wheel. Building one is rather easy, I used a blower motor with a 6" pulley attached to the shaft. Mount the motor so the shaft sits vertical. The mold is sandwiched between a piece of plywood and the pulley, held in place with a series of staybolts around the perimeter. The plywood has a hole in the center that lines up with the center of the mold. The staybolts are just snugged down, this allows the air to escape out of the mold when pouring. Here is a secret that I had to find out the hard way. Mount the assembly in a cut off metal trash can or 55 gallon barrel with the top of the mold at least 12" below the top edge. It is amazing what flying molten metal can do to a pair of jeans when you mis the sprue hole much less to your skin, ouch doesn't even cover it.

    If it's not nailed down, it's mine.
    If I can pry it loose, it's not nailed down.


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    ok so your saying that i can do it at home right?
    do you have a pic from your cast dude?



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    oh just found some think,its goes pretty much like this doesnt it?
    http://www.watchrepairer.co.uk/How%2...0Jewellery.htm



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    I hate to be negative but 2muchstuff said he did it with lead (melting point 328°C). The link you posted was the lost wax method, not centrifugal, and the cast was in silver (melting point 960°C).

    I just can't see how you will be able to melt Inconel at home.



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    ok lets leave the melting part away for a sec.
    in centrifugal casting the muld spins to get the metal to all the parts of the muld right?
    so basickly if ill get some think that can spin it around it will work right?



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    some think like this?

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Casting Engine Parts-wbitcfdshsds-jpg  


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    The nickel based super alloys need to be melted under a controlled environment (Vaccuum?).

    Regards,
    Mark


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    Okay but im not talking about the alloy now
    i just want to know how the centrifugal Machine works.



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    Quote Originally Posted by RotarySMP
    The nickel based super alloys need to be melted under a controlled environment (Vaccuum?).
    why do you think superalloys need to be vacum melted?



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