Highschool CNC Machine Project

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  1. #1
    yoobsterlol's Avatar
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    Default Highschool CNC Machine Project

    Not 100% sure this is the right forum for this but here it goes. I am looking to build a relatively decent cnc mill/router for materials like 7075 aluminum and hardwoods. I chose this as my final project in my robotics course(and probably bit off more than I can chew)so it must be completed by early-mid January. Can anybody possibly give some parts lists that I can look at to see if I'm missing anything? This is what I have so far(I will simplify it just so it isn't too tedious to look through)

    3x ball screw(Sfu 1204)(end bearings and supports, nuts, and couplers as well)

    3x Nema23 stepper motors (2.8A)(not sure if these would be powerful enough for milling something like 7075 Al)

    6x limit switches

    1x Arduino Uno(one of the requirements was that it uses an arduino or a raspberry pi)

    1x Gshield stepper driver

    + various structural pieces that will make up the body of the machine

    Anything else that I'm missing?



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    Default Re: Highschool CNC Machine Project

    Early-mid January is coming right up - I'd say the main thing you're missing is time. It's hard to say whether those motors will work or not, without having some specs on them and knowing what you're using for a power supply, Do you have a plan for this machine? What are you going to build it out of - aluminum extrusions? What are you planning to use for slides? Is this going to have a spindle of some sort? Are you going to use a breakout board? I hope you don't think you can run all those motors off that one driver. A picture showing how this proposed machine will be constructed and run would help us point out anything else that's missing.

    Andrew Werby
    https://computersculpture.com/


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    yoobsterlol's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by awerby View Post
    Early-mid January is coming right up - I'd say the main thing you're missing is time. It's hard to say whether those motors will work or not, without having some specs on them and knowing what you're using for a power supply, Do you have a plan for this machine? What are you going to build it out of - aluminum extrusions? What are you planning to use for slides? Is this going to have a spindle of some sort? Are you going to use a breakout board? I hope you don't think you can run all those motors off that one driver. A picture showing how this proposed machine will be constructed and run would help us point out anything else that's missing.
    The power supply I'm still kinda looking around for. I am currently working on plans while I wait to get parts. I will probably using a combination of aluminum extrusions and solid plate. I do plan on having a spindle in the future but for now(so I can pass) I will just mount a pen or something and write a sentence. As for the Gshield, with my current research, I should be able to run all 3 motors just fine, I've heard of some using it on their own cnc machines.



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    Default Re: Highschool CNC Machine Project

    I looked up the G-shield, and you're right - it seems to have 3 drivers built in, so you're okay there. But it maxes out at 24 volts, which is marginal for driving NEMA 23 motors (forget about 12v). Most of them will have too much inductance to run well at that voltage, so look for motors with as little as possible. (.87 mH would be optimum, but anything under 1mH should work okay - don't worry about the holding torque number).Here's an example of a motor like that: Stepper Motor, NEMA 23, 2.3V VEXTA PK266-03A-C22 | MPJA.COM

    Andrew Werby
    https://computersculpture.com/


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    Quote Originally Posted by awerby View Post
    I looked up the G-shield, and you're right - it seems to have 3 drivers built in, so you're okay there. But it maxes out at 24 volts, which is marginal for driving NEMA 23 motors (forget about 12v). Most of them will have too much inductance to run well at that voltage, so look for motors with as little as possible. (.87 mH would be optimum, but anything under 1mH should work okay - don't worry about the holding torque number).Here's an example of a motor like that: Stepper Motor, NEMA 23, 2.3V VEXTA PK266-03A-C22 | MPJA.COM
    I will look into it, thanks for the advice!



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