Cleaning Photo Engravings Without Ruining Them?


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    Member KannaKraft's Avatar
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    Default Cleaning Photo Engravings Without Ruining Them?

    Hi everyone,

    I'm working with a Boss HP-5597, 200watt and trying to dial in good practices for photoengraving, mostly engraving on baltic birch ply for now. I'm using quality, hi res, black and white photos, creating halftone bitmaps and the only two issues I'm having are as follows:

    The dust/soot from engraving is falling in the "blacks" and lightening them, destroying my depth, contrast and range of value. When I attempt to clean the dust out, I inadvertently clean out all of the color/value and am left with a washed out image.

    I am also losing detail to the image either being too dark over all or too light over all but no amount of correction seems to fix this. This second issue is not nearly as important as the first but I'll take advice if you have experience.

    I appreciate all of your input--as long as you aren't here to just tell me I don't know what I'm doing.Constructive advice only, please!



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    YQC1994's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KannaKraft View Post
    Hi everyone,

    I'm working with a Boss HP-5597, 200watt and trying to dial in good practices for photoengraving, mostly engraving on baltic birch ply for now. I'm using quality, hi res, black and white photos, creating halftone bitmaps and the only two issues I'm having are as follows:

    The dust/soot from engraving is falling in the "blacks" and lightening them, destroying my depth, contrast and range of value. When I attempt to clean the dust out, I inadvertently clean out all of the color/value and am left with a washed out image.

    I am also losing detail to the image either being too dark over all or too light over all but no amount of correction seems to fix this. This second issue is not nearly as important as the first but I'll take advice if you have experience.

    I appreciate all of your input--as long as you aren't here to just tell me I don't know what I'm doing.Constructive advice only, please!
    A transfer mask may improve the detail of your engraved product.



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    Member KannaKraft's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by YQC1994 View Post
    A transfer mask may improve the detail of your engraved product.
    Hi there--thank you for your response ! Can you explain what you mean by a transfer mask? Masking with masking tape is not an option due to the high detail of hi res photos



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    Default Re: Cleaning Photo Engravings Without Ruining Them?

    Quote Originally Posted by KannaKraft View Post
    Hi there--thank you for your response ! Can you explain what you mean by a transfer mask? Masking with masking tape is not an option due to the high detail of hi res photos
    YQC1994 meant using paper tape for example. After engraving, it should be removed from the engraving object. This is good advice.
    I also got acquainted with the capabilities of your machine and most likely you are using a fiber emitter to engrave a tree, which is a fundamentally wrong approach. You need a CO2 emitter. Also try to increase the distance between the nozzle of the machine and the object, in this case the spot of the beam will increase and you will get a more contrast image.



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    Member KannaKraft's Avatar
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    Default Re: Cleaning Photo Engravings Without Ruining Them?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bonifacy View Post
    YQC1994 meant using paper tape for example. After engraving, it should be removed from the engraving object. This is good advice.
    I also got acquainted with the capabilities of your machine and most likely you are using a fiber emitter to engrave a tree, which is a fundamentally wrong approach. You need a CO2 emitter. Also try to increase the distance between the nozzle of the machine and the object, in this case the spot of the beam will increase and you will get a more contrast image.
    Hi--no we have a 200 watt co2 laser cutter, not fiber. Can't use tape as it would be un-removable after a photoengrave. Thank you for your input!



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    Default Re: Cleaning Photo Engravings Without Ruining Them?

    We, Bell Laser, have a sonic speed air nozzle that will disperse the soot and sticky fumes during engraving.Cleaning Photo Engravings Without Ruining Them?-focus_nozzle_co2_laser_supersonic_mahoney-png

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Cleaning Photo Engravings Without Ruining Them?-focus_nozzle_co2_laser_supersonic_mahoney-png  


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    Default Re: Cleaning Photo Engravings Without Ruining Them?

    if you know what you do and material plus high quality laser you don't have to clean your work please look at the wood engraving and there is no burns no tape needed no postmarking work needed



    Kind Regards.



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Cleaning Photo Engravings Without Ruining Them?

Cleaning Photo Engravings Without Ruining Them?

Cleaning Photo Engravings Without Ruining Them?