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Thread: Reasonably Rigid Router (RRR) - a cautionary tale (likely) in the making.

  1. #181
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    Default Re: Reasonably Rigid Router (RRR) - a cautionary tale (likely) in the making.

    Hi,
    in the first instance I would measure with a multimeter the voltage output of pin 26. It is, I would guess a 10V, or maybe 12V supply (low current capable only). It would be measured between pin 26 and pin 11.
    That would make it very similar to the analogue terminals of your VFD.

    It may be however that the servo DOES not produce a steady supply voltage, in which case your external circuit must supply the required current.

    Craig



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    Quote Originally Posted by joeavaerage View Post
    Hi,
    this is the problem with cheap Chinese servos.....the manuals are crap.

    The idea is correct however, set the servo up in velocity mode and the velocity of the servo will be determined by the analogue inputs at 26,10,11.

    The conventional idea is that 0 to10V will cause rotation in one direction, say CCW and 0 to -10V will cause rotation in the opposite direction. Referring to my own Allen Bradley and Delta servos
    the primary direction (CCW OR CW with positive input) is programmable via parameters.. I imagine your servo is the same...good luck trying to find and program the parameters however.

    Do you need counter-rotation?. In the early days I had Mach programmed to run in either direction, but then hardly, if ever, used it.

    Start by doing some simple experiments with a simple 9V battery and a variable resistor and a couple of bits of wire on inputs 26,10, 11 until you can control the speed and direction to your
    satisfaction....which will inform you as to how to wire the analogue inputs into your machine.

    Craig
    Thanks Craig!

    The parameters are pretty clearly laid out in the manual thankfully, and it's easy enough to adjust with the push buttons on the drive panel.

    I don't really need the reverse, I will be using it for rigid tapping at some point, but that's not possible with the little board I have now, I will implement it using the servo in step and direction mode I think when I go to linuxcnc after buying a set of 750w servo kits from the people I got this one from. I am going to fiddle with this one in step/dir mode also to see how well easy it is to get right to prove feasibility for the cheap servo upgrade (they really are very cheap).

    I appreciate the input a lot. It's really rewarding going from initial severe puzzlement to understanding the (albeit simple) operation of drive control.

    Build thread: https://www.cnczone.com/forums/diy-cnc-router-table-machines/429232-forum.html#post2496634


  3. #183
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    Default Re: Reasonably Rigid Router (RRR) - a cautionary tale (likely) in the making.

    Hi,

    The parameters are pretty clearly laid out in the manual thankfully, and it's easy enough to adjust with the push buttons on the drive panel.
    Both my Allen Bradley and Delta servos have set-up and tuning software on a PC that you can program the drives firmware. It makes finding and programming such parameters
    very much easier and less error prone. The next time you buy a servo insist that it have set-up and tuning software.

    I don't really need the reverse, I will be using it for rigid tapping at some point, but that's not possible with the little board I have now, I will implement it using the servo in step and direction mode
    That is exactly how I operate my Allen Bradley servo which is a spindle motor. The servo is dual mode, that is to say that most of the time its programmed to be a free running motor under 0-10V analogue
    control. I can by asserting one digital input, swap to Step/Dir control....and its this feature that I use for rigid tapping. I don't use it that often but that was always my intention. 99% of the time the servo
    is just a free running spindle, and only 1% of the time where it is position control mode for rigid tapping, or I suppose indexing spindle control.

    Craig



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    Member luke peter's Avatar
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    Default Re: Reasonably Rigid Router (RRR) - a cautionary tale (likely) in the making.

    Quote Originally Posted by joeavaerage View Post
    Hi,
    in the first instance I would measure with a multimeter the voltage output of pin 26. It is, I would guess a 10V, or maybe 12V supply (low current capable only). It would be measured between pin 26 and pin 11.
    That would make it very similar to the analogue terminals of your VFD.

    It may be however that the servo DOES not produce a steady supply voltage, in which case your external circuit must supply the required current.

    Craig
    Thanks Craig.

    I will try this.

    Build thread: https://www.cnczone.com/forums/diy-cnc-router-table-machines/429232-forum.html#post2496634


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Reasonably Rigid Router (RRR) - a cautionary tale (likely) in the making.

Reasonably Rigid Router (RRR) - a cautionary tale (likely) in the making.

Reasonably Rigid Router (RRR) - a cautionary tale (likely) in the making.