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Thread: GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design

  1. #37
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    Default Re: GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design

    Quote Originally Posted by stuarttaylor00 View Post
    This is great reading thank you Gary - I almost pulled the trigger on the FLA Saturn some time ago, but the stories of warped frames and quality issues scared me off..

    Your design is quite similar to what I have been drawing up, I took a lot of inspiration from the CNCRP machines - unfortunately in Australia postage is about 30% of the cost of the machine...

    Thanks for sharing!

    Thank you, Stuart. I cannot imagine having a Saturn shipped to Australia only to find out it's seriously defective. Yikes!


    Stay tuned. More to come.

    Gary



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    Default Re: GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design

    Quote Originally Posted by stuarttaylor00 View Post
    This is great reading thank you Gary - I almost pulled the trigger on the FLA Saturn some time ago, but the stories of warped frames and quality issues scared me off..

    Your design is quite similar to what I have been drawing up, I took a lot of inspiration from the CNCRP machines - unfortunately in Australia postage is about 30% of the cost of the machine...

    Thanks for sharing!
    Not all the Saturn 2 machines are bad, I have one that works fine. No warping or otherwise. You have to realize that the CNCZone Forum only gets the few who have issues, posting. I think if you went over and looked you would maybe find 10 posters who have had negative reviews. Who knows how many have been sold without problems as it seems Nate is always busy and behind. Very poor customer service and shipping delays are the norm, but the machines are decent. Given the fact your overseas I would pass. His machine is very much like the CAMaster, in design, anyway!!

    You might look at the CNCRP Pro machines. I have the Plug and Play electronics and control system on mine and I have built panels in a past career. They did a good job and it worked out of the box so to speak. I have since gone from Mach3 to Mach4, and that was a good improvement.

    Since the CNCRP is a kit you might get a break on your Import duty and VAT?

    Retired Master Electrician, HVAC/R Commercial. FLA Saturn 2 4x4 CNC Router Mach4 Kimber 1911 45ACP


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    Default Re: GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design

    Progress!!!


    I've finished milling the gantry mounting/interface plates. I wish I had a CNC to cut the plates. Would have taken no time, as compared to manual milling. Oh well. Make do with what you have.



    GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design-img_0552-jpg


    These are the angle brace plates. Note that the hole down the center of the two in the foreground are tapered for flat head cap screws. The two lines of holes on the outside of the piece on the right are threaded.

    GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design-img_0553-jpg

    Same pieces, only the ones in the foreground are flipped over. The piece on the left are counterbored.

    GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design-img_0554-jpg

    This photo shows the angle brace assembly mounted to the plate that attaches to the underside of the gantry. The 8 screws go into blind threaded holes. 8 screws are probably overkill, but I took the opportunity to add stiffness to the 3/8" mounting plate. The open area adjacent to the angle brace is where the the plate mounts to the gantry extrusion. Note the six holes adjacent to the black flat head cap screws. They are slots, which allow way more adjustment than I need to square the gantry.

    GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design-img_0555-jpg

    Same as the photo directly above, but at a different angle.


    GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design-img_0556-jpg


    Same as above, only showing the plate and support assembly from the top side.

    GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design-img_0557-jpg


    This photo show where the mounting plate will mount to the gantry. The mounting plate mounts to the bottom of the gantry, while the vertical piece mounts to the front face of the gantry.


    Continued next thread

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design-img_0552-jpg   GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design-img_0553-jpg   GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design-img_0554-jpg   GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design-img_0555-jpg  

    GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design-img_0556-jpg   GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design-img_0557-jpg  


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    Default Re: GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design

    GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design-img_0558-jpg

    Just another angle on the mounting plate and brace.

    GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design-img_0559-jpg

    This photo shows the 3/4" plate on the right, which attaches to the linear rail bearing blocks. Note the 8 counterbored holes down the center. They are where the plate attaches to the bearing blocks. The six holes on the outside edge, in the foreground, are threaded. The four in back are slots. Again, they allow adjustment of gantry square.

    GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design-img_0561-jpg


    Six screw added mounting the upper plate to the lower one. The slots in the upper plate are covered by the washers. Note that the lower plate extends about 1.5" beyond the upper plate. It extends beyond the side of the extrusion and aligns the R&P drive with the gear rack.

    GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design-img_0564-jpg

    This photo shows the entire assembly mounted to the extrusion. Both the upper and lower plates are attached.

    GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design-img_0566-jpg

    In this photo, I rolled the gantry over on its face to give a different perspective.

    GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design-img_0568-jpg


    This shot shows shows the four screws that go through both the lower and upper plates and attach in the gantry extrusion slots. There are slots in the lower plates and plain holes in the upper. Again, this preserves gantry adjustability for square. You can see the ends of the screws passing through from the top. The screws are a little long, but since they don't interfere with anything, I'm going to go ahead and use them. I like the idea of utilizing the full 3/4" thickness of the lower plate. The eight holes left open is where the lower plate attaches to the bearing blocks.

    There is a definite assembly order. The angle plate must be assembled first. Then the angle assembly is attached to the upper plate. The whole upper assembly is then attached to the gantry. The lower plate is screwed the the bearing blocks, and the upper assembly is attached to the lower. It all has to do with access, since adding a part out of order results in not being able to get to some of the mounting screws.

    You may have noticed that most of the aluminum does not show milling marks from facing. That's because I sanded them out with a random orbit sanding. The two pieces to which the angle plate are mounted still show milling marks. That's because I was concerned with narrow (2") width. There was no way to ensure that my sander would stay flat on the surfaces. It was likely (nearly a sure thing) that I would round over the faces. I didn't want to go there. I could have mounted some paper on a perfectly flat surface, e.g., thick plate glass and worked out the marks that way. While it would worked, this stuff takes a lot of paper changes and doing it totally by hand would have taken forever.

    I've read about a number of ways to sand aluminum. Trying without lubricant renders the paper useless in seconds. I've ready about WD-40. For some reason, I couldn't find mine and wasn't going to make a trip into town for one item. Water has been mentioned. My random orbit is electric and my paper wouldn't take hold up to even small amounts of water. Anyway, I'm not risking the shock hazard. So, what to use? Paint thinner. I used the low odor variety. I soaked some paper towel with it, wiped it on and sanded away, I still went though many disks, but the paper lasted a good deal longer than without the thinner. I started with a quick hit of 60, then 150, then 220 and stopped at 320. Did a nice job.

    If I had this to do over (thank goodness I don't), I wouldn't have bothered to face the pieces. Rather, I would have just sanded them and called it good. I have some more pieces to make, e.g., end covers for the extrusions. I will not be facing those pieces.

    Next up: Installing the 25mm Hiwin HG Linear Rails.


    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design-img_0558-jpg   GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design-img_0559-jpg   GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design-img_0561-jpg   GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design-img_0564-jpg  

    GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design-img_0566-jpg   GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design-img_0568-jpg  


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    Default Re: GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design

    Beautiful work Gary. If those angle attachment bolts at the bottom will not be accessible, I am assuming you used Red Loctite on those?

    Retired Master Electrician, HVAC/R Commercial. FLA Saturn 2 4x4 CNC Router Mach4 Kimber 1911 45ACP


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    Default Re: GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design

    Looks nice Gary!!



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    Default Re: GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design

    Quote Originally Posted by wmgeorge View Post
    Beautiful work Gary. If those angle attachment bolts at the bottom will not be accessible, I am assuming you used Red Loctite on those?

    Thank you, Bill. No loctite yet, but I will be using it. Probably blue, rather than red. If I ever want to break it all down, I don't what have to use heat to unscrew it. The assembly and attachment was just for photographic purposes at this point, so loctite wasn't necessary.

    Gary

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Ntl View Post
    Looks nice Gary!!

    Thank you, Dan.



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    Default Re: GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design

    That's one beefy setup. Keep going....



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    Default Re: GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design

    Quote Originally Posted by davida1234 View Post
    That's one beefy setup. Keep going....

    Thanks, David. Beefy is what I'm going for. Although this will mainly be a wood router, I plan to cut aluminum as well. In fact, I plan to use it mill to caps for the extrusion ends, hard stops, etc. Much faster than manual milling with all the setups, tool changes, etc I can also cut fancier shapes with the CNC as compared to my mill.

    I've given thought to using 3/4" HPDE for the spoilboard top (re: your build thread), but I'm on the fence.

    On profile/through cuts, I zero to the spoilboard, then move Z axis up the nominal thickness to the piece I'm cutting and hit zero again. My cam thinks I'm zero'd to the top of the piece and the thickness I set is nominal (vs. actual). So, for 3/4" plywood, which is less than 3/4", I tell cad/cam the thickness is 3/4" and Z=0 is the top of a 3/4" thick plece. As long as the offset for my touch plate is accurate, and it is, my bit will always stop at the top of the spoilboard, but never cut into it. With my other machine, except for when my Z screw coupler slipped once, it worked 100% of the time. Long way around to reach one conclusion: The cost isn't as much of an impediment as it might otherwise be, because my spoilboard will probably have a useful life of several years. (For two-sided carving, I'll use a sacrificial piece of MDF for drilling locating dowel holes).

    What keeps me on the fence? HDPE is slippery as heck. Maybe not as slick as UHMW plastic, but still slick. That makes clamping an issue. Up until now, I've used T-track ala Orange Aluminum (https://www.orangealuminum.com/t-tra...cessories.html) and cut maple blocks of varying lengths for clamping. MDF provides frictional resistance; nothing moves. I question how to get enough resistance with HDPE. I can see parts slipping around and ruining the job.

    What technique(s) do you use for clamping to HDPE? Reaching under a 4 x 4 machine (actual frame dimensions 74" x 60") to tighten bolts won't work for me.

    Gary




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    Default Re: GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design

    With MDF you have an option of using wood screws to hold down if needed. I use my track and clamps most of the time but its not always convenient.

    Retired Master Electrician, HVAC/R Commercial. FLA Saturn 2 4x4 CNC Router Mach4 Kimber 1911 45ACP


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    Default Re: GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design

    Quote Originally Posted by GME View Post
    HDPE is slippery as heck. That makes clamping an issue. MDF provides frictional resistance; nothing moves.
    Yes, HDPE is slippery and I do not advocate that you use it as a spoil board. But the
    material checks most of the other boxes so it is a compromise you would have make.

    It also depends a bit on your style of holding material on a spoil board. I personally
    rarely use clamps as I don't like always making sure I don't hit any of those. Too easy
    to break a bit for my taste. I almost always drill some holes in the material and screw it
    down. If you are into serial production, those screw holes get bad pretty quickly in MDF.

    HDPE does hold screws very well and doesn't go bad with screw holes but it is not as
    easy to drive a screw first time into it as with MDF. A pilot hole works well but is not as
    convenient as with MDF or BB.

    I have both a BB plywood and HDPE as spoil boards for the Brygga, If you follow my
    thread, you can see how it will fare. I will make some videos with clamping and screwing
    down on the HDPE.



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    Default Re: GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design

    Quote Originally Posted by wmgeorge View Post
    With MDF you have an option of using wood screws to hold down if needed. I use my track and clamps most of the time but its not always convenient.
    Thanks, Bill. I have never used screws in MDF. I have always used the t-tracks for my anchoring points. On my first machine, my biggest limitation with t-tracks had to do with the number of tracks used/spacing between them. I had them spaced too far apart, which sometimes created challenges when clamping things down. Small pieces were problematic, as were certain sized larger pieces. I was able to compensate, at least to some extent, by cutting maple hold downs longer, but I ended up with too many hold down sizes. Storing them started to become an issue. This time around, I plan to use more tracks and space them closer together.

    I was fortunate to stumble onto the t-tracks Orange Aluminum offers. At $8.54/4' piece, they have the best price I've found by a wide margin., e.g., Rocker sells 4' for $30, Woodcraft $20. Spend $100 and shipping is free. They also offer 8' pieces at $17.08 each with the same deal on free shipping. You don't get colored anodizing, but not a big deal for me.

    Gary



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