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Thread: work with what you got build

  1. #25
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    Default Re: work with what you got build

    Ok, i've been limping along with my machine for a while and I have not had large enough blocks of time available to make improvements, however it works and so I trying to not "improve" it into a non working state so I can get actual work out of it instead of putting all the work into it....


    I did discover that it mills cast iron surprisingly well and much better than aluminum. Is this normal? I slotted for about 3 hours on a single 2mm carbide end mill running 10k rpm on the spindle. 220mm/m and .5mm doc without seeming to dull the bit or have any issue. The machine does not seem to cut aluminum as well. No air on the chips and no dust collection. What gives?



  2. #26
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    Default Re: work with what you got build

    Quote Originally Posted by jschoch View Post
    Ok, i've been limping along with my machine for a while and I have not had large enough blocks of time available to make improvements, however it works and so I trying to not "improve" it into a non working state so I can get actual work out of it instead of putting all the work into it....


    I did discover that it mills cast iron surprisingly well and much better than aluminum. Is this normal? I slotted for about 3 hours on a single 2mm carbide end mill running 10k rpm on the spindle. 220mm/m and .5mm doc without seeming to dull the bit or have any issue. The machine does not seem to cut aluminum as well. No air on the chips and no dust collection. What gives?
    Cast iron is a very interesting material to machine. The high graphite content means that it can be machined dry no problem. The really bad problem is that its chips are extremely abrasive. Some machinist will refuse to machineit on their good mills for fear of the damage it will cause the machine. Aluminum on the other hand can be a real ***** in the sense that it loads up tools.



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work with what you got build