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Thread: Carbonfiber Gantry

  1. #73
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    Default Re: Carbonfiber Gantry

    Quote Originally Posted by wizard View Post
    There is another issue that people might not be acknowledging, going fast is hell on your linear bearings. So if the reason to go to carbon fiber is to go fast, I'm not convinced it is worthwhile. At least not in a normal cartesian arraignment of a machine tool.
    most industrial high end routers, and some mills, go 3000-5000ipm. some lasers move upwards of 10000ipm. caged linear bearings seem to be quite happy with high speeds. some of the max ratings listed for bearings are in the 600m/m range, that's up to 20000ipm.

    highly preloaded and non caged bearings would have a much lower maximum limit. caged balls rub against each other generating a lot of heat and wear.

    think of it this way. a 1" angular contact bearing in your 24000rpm spindle is effectively moving at over 75000ipm.

    wotzBotz


  2. #74
    Community Moderator ger21's Avatar
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    Default Re: Carbonfiber Gantry

    linear bearings will last a lifetime at 2000-3000ipm in a DIY machine.

    Gerry

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  3. #75
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    Default Re: Carbonfiber Gantry

    I am currently building a fixed gantry mill and am using carbon fiber to cover the quartz counter top I am using for the build. The local quartz dealer has remnants for $10 a square foot so I have all the material I need for the build for $270. The mill has a cutting area of 20" x 20" by 8". The carbon fiber I am using is 0.011" thick and the 10 yard roll I purchased is 60" wide, cost was $220. The gallon resin I just purchased should cover the 150 square foot of carbon fiber and was $150 with the pumps. So for a cost of around $700 for the frame materials I think its very competitive with other materials. The quartz is less stiff than aluminum on its own but when you add 8 layers of carbon fiber it is stiffer. The two materials complement each other with the carbon on the outside in tension and the quartz on the inside in compression. I have read that epoxy quartz is twice as good a cast iron in vibration dampening. One disadvantage is that you have to add inserts for all your tapped holes then go back and drill and tap after the epoxy has set. Anyway I am having fun with the build so far.



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    Default Re: Carbonfiber Gantry

    Sounds pretty interesting. Do you have any pics?



  5. #77
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    Default Re: Carbonfiber Gantry

    I am documenting the build here in this thread - Quartz Counter top for Mill Base.



  6. #78
    Activation process peteeng's Avatar
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    Default Re: Carbonfiber Gantry

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff0000 View Post
    I've read this whole thread. And the thing that keeps coming to mind is that cf is damaged so easy and it's nearly impossible to fix once damaged. So why would you want to use it where a little bump can cause significant damage?
    I've done enough maintenance in machine shops to notice one thing, not a single one looks showroom condition.
    I know this is old but CF is easily fixed if damaged. In the case of a machine part firstly you would dress it just like a damaged metal part and leave it be. The CF part is likely to be very well over designed for stiffness which means its uber designed for strength. CF is ideal for making machine parts, its come of age and understanding. The argument that weight is great is an old paradigm. Modern design using simulation can sort all sorts of vibration issues before the build. If you build a straight rectangular CF tube you will not compete with aluminium but if you build a mould and have all the required features for fittings, taper the part and have very little post work then you will be well ahead of any metal for the job. To build such a mould means you would need to make many parts so for a one off part this is prohibitive. Peter



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    Default Re: Carbonfiber Gantry

    You have waken up an old thread here.

    The negative with respect to CF are many when it comes to home built machines. One of the biggest problems is finding good information on its usage. It isn’t like metal working where literally hundreds of resources exist to assist even a novice builder. This especially when you consider very viable machine structures can be created with out computer intensive modeling of the structures. Consider my local situation where literally hundreds of machine shops and various sheet metal and allied shops exist. If you are willing to pay for it you can easily have critical work done for you. With CF I know of no local help if I wanted to go that way.

    Understand here that I’m not knocking CF, in fact I’m always interested in alternative ways. The problem isn’t so much the positives with respect to carbon fiber but rather the lack of experience and the potential to waste a lot of money. In this respect I’d like to see a well documented build that would allow one to learn the techniques from the ground up.

    Quote Originally Posted by peteeng View Post
    I know this is old but CF is easily fixed if damaged. In the case of a machine part firstly you would dress it just like a damaged metal part and leave it be. The CF part is likely to be very well over designed for stiffness which means its uber designed for strength. CF is ideal for making machine parts, its come of age and understanding. The argument that weight is great is an old paradigm. Modern design using simulation can sort all sorts of vibration issues before the build. If you build a straight rectangular CF tube you will not compete with aluminium but if you build a mould and have all the required features for fittings, taper the part and have very little post work then you will be well ahead of any metal for the job. To build such a mould means you would need to make many parts so for a one off part this is prohibitive. Peter




  8. #80
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    Default Re: Carbonfiber Gantry

    Hi Wizard - I appreciate what you say. You either jump in or stay with what you know. Depends on your nature. Happy to answer Q's on composites, pick a part and we'll talk it through. I started making steel bicycle frames some 30 years ago, then CF frames then decided that was too hard so built 1000's of aluminium frames then moved into marine composites then industrial composites. Now I'm commercially into huge steel mining machines, the wheels turn.....and my own small CNC machines... Been an interesting journey. Peter



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