aviation clips connecters


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  1. #1
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    Default aviation clips connecters

    i bought this (Uxcell a15070400ux0496 10Pairs 16 mm Thread 4 Pins Male Female Panel Metal Aviation Wire Connector from amazon i know the side that goes to the breakout board need to be solder but the side that goes to the motors has a screw you have to remove to attach the wire leads. is there a clip that is made for that side or does this side need to be solder as well it looks as if its made to be clipped on

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  2. #2
    Member Jim Dawson's Avatar
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    Default Re: aviation clips connecters

    I think the motor side needs to be soldered also. You have to remove the inner plastic piece from the shell, and solder the wires to the pins.

    Jim Dawson
    Sandy, Oregon, USA


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    Default Re: aviation clips connecters

    Yes, those are solder-cup style connectors. I have some similar ones here for a project.

    If you have never soldered these kind of plugs before, I suggest you check out YouTube, try search term "solder cup".

    Also, if you don't have a proper temperature controlled soldering station - get one. It makes all the difference in the world. Even a cheap one is better than a non-controlled iron (or a wattage controlled iron - if it doesn't have a readout in Deg C/F, but just goes "low - high" - don't buy it).
    Counter-intuitively, a small tip is not best for this. You want as large a tip on the iron as you can get, but you want to turn the temperature down to just above your solder's melting point. This will bring the contact up to the required temperature, without overshooting it. I use Chip-Quik No-Clean Paste Flux in a syringe; it does a good job of making the solder flow well, but it cleans up with 99% isopropyl quite nicely (you don't have to clean it, but if you don't it's a little sticky). However, there are other brands of flux that work nicely. Magnification helps tremendously - I spent the $$$ a decade or so ago and got a stereo microscope; but even just a magnifying glass on an arm (so you can position it) helps a lot. I put a little solder on the tip to act as a heat-transfer bridge between the tip and the contact; I find that this makes it go much faster.

    Probably obvious, but I'll mention it here anyway... be sure you use electronics grade solder and flux for electronics work. The stuff they sell at the hardware store for plumbing will cause corrosion to your electronics over time (this by the way, is what "No Clean" flux is all about - other highly activated fluxes have to be cleaned off or they will corrode anything they are in contact with).

    The other thing I do is slip some heat-shrink tubing on the wires before I solder them into the cups. Usually, if I'm quick enough, the heat of soldering won't set off the heat-shrink; and I can slip it down over the soldered connection to prevent the possibility of shorts between the pins. Yes, the pins are spaced so that in theory that shouldn't be needed, but, well, belt-and-suspenders approach, I guess. Otherwise, filling the plug with some acid-free silicone isn't a bad idea; it keeps stuff away from the pins, but doesn't stick so tenaciously that it's hard to get off if you ever need to work on the plug again.





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    Member john-100's Avatar
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    Default Re: aviation clips connecters

    You will find using 60/40 lead tin solder easier than lead free
    that does not flow as well and needs more heat to be applied !

    do not apply too much solder
    the solder will wick up inside the stranded wire and
    when flexed the wire will break where the solder stops inside the wire

    nothing wrong with the belt & braces approach

    adding heat shrink to insulate the solder terminals
    ( although heat shrink sleeving can hide a broken solder joint )

    if you opt to use silicon sealant you need to ensure its non corrosive and
    does not release acetic acid as it cures

    for example look at RS components

    https://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/silic...lants/0494118/

    John



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    Default Re: aviation clips connecters

    thanks for the responses i am using the heat shrink to encapsulate the solder joints i have the correct iron and using 60/40 with rosin core electrical solder i did figure out as how to solder cups pain in but at first but by the third time trying it i think i have a handle on it thanks again



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