V-RAM vs RIGID RAM


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    Default V-RAM vs RIGID RAM

    I am interested in purchasing a Bridgeport Boss series 1 machine for a retrofit to more modern controls. One of the machines which I look at has a V-Ram and the other has a Rigid Ram. What are the advantages of one over the other?

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    rigid ram can machine until you stall the spindle. It cannot tilt tho. rarely miss it.



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    Does a Rigid Ram machine produce a smoother finish?



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    Depends on how rigid the ram is and what you are cutting.



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    WA TOOLMAN,

    I quest the question is does a Rigid-Ram Bridgeport boss series 1 produce a finer finish that a V-Ram cnc Bridgeport boss series 1 on say aluminum or steel.
    It appears to me that during the same time period Bridgeport produced both rigid and v ram series 1 boss machines. I assume that the rigid rams were less expensive while the v-ram machines offered more versatility. I can only speculate as to whether the rigid-ram had the capability of producing a better finish as it would appear that this design was more rigid. Since I have had no experience with either machine I am asking for comments from those in the group who have had experience with either or preferably both type of machines.
    jshank



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    I've got a rigid ram and the surface finish is dominated by the steppers and the backlash on the ballscrews. Unless you are looking at a mint machine with little wear or are doing heavy material removal, I don't think you'll see the difference based on the head design. I think for most of these machines the somewhat limited resolution (.001 on my BOSS 5) and the ballscrews with millions of inches on them dominate the rigidity of the machine. Like I said if you run into a machine that hasn't been used too much, you might see the difference.

    If you're gonna be plowing through steel all day, you might want a rigid ram. If you're doing mostly lighter cuts, you might like the versatility of the v ram, but you'll be happy with either.

    Have fun
    Matt



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    The rigid ram is the superior machine in all aspects except angling. the knuckle is the worst part of every bridgeport



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    Registered mc-motorsports's Avatar
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    Dumb question, what is the knuckle? And how do you tram the head square on a ridgid ram? Or is this factory set and it just remains in tolerance? My only complaint about the V ram is if you do stall the spindle, or crash, 9 out of 10 times you knock the head out of square.



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    The knuckle is the part that gives you the angling of the head

    The rigid ram has a small amount of side to side adjustment, butI have never touched it. You will not kick it without a sledgehammer



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    Gus,
    I take it that you feel the rigid ram is superior because it’s design offers more rigidity. Isn’t the ability of the head to be tilted worth anything? I have occasionally tilted and or moved in or out the head on my manual Bridgeport and when the occasion arose which I was glad that the machine had this ability. If I invest the time and money to upgrade a Bridgeport boss series 1 I would like to be sure of which, v-ram or rigid-ram, machine I am going to be happy with. There seems to be more rigid-ram available on the used market.

    Jeff



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    I've always heard "tilt" refer to rotating the head in the ZX plane. The term I've heard for rotating it in the YZ is "nod", the same as nodding your head. Not that it matters; the rigid ram does neither, while the dovetail ram does both, but it's the nod that requires the ram be able to slide. Otherwise, the cutting tool would be outside the work envelope of the table. Sliding the ram back and forth gets it back where you need it.

    This would seem to make the machine more versatile, but was pretty rare on CNC mills. Why? Because there are other ways to get there. Trying to machine a piece on a plane other than the normal axes of the machine is a nightmare to set up; how do you tram the work, and what do you pick up? Most 3-D work combines multiple angular or curved surfaces with details that need to be normal to the machine axes, and it's easier to cut these surfaces with multiple passes of a ball nose end mill. Any part that's a single simple angle cut can always be done by fixturing the work on a sine plate or rotary table. Adding a NC controlled rotary table as a fourth axis allows the work to be tilted normal to the tool under the machine's control, so it can rotate the work back to normal for further operations without losing its place.

    I would say that the fact that most CNC mills are rigid ram indicates that the tilting head proved to be not as useful on them as one would think.

    Dennis



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    Registered mc-motorsports's Avatar
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    Very true, in 5 years, I can't remember the last time I tilted or nodded the head on a bridgeport, and fixturing can be more accurate, but it would be indespensable in rare situations. The nicest part about the V-ram is being able to put the head out over the table and clamp the work to the side of the table. Great for milling and drilling shafts that are 24" long. Did that all the time at a shop I used to work for, CNC spindle repair.



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    Well, you can either tilt, or run a 3/4 end mill 120 inches a minute half an inch deep in aluminum without a peep. Which will make you more money?



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    It seems all REAL CNC's are rigid, and with 3 axis motion, you don't "really" need to tilt the head to do tilted head work, there will be rare exceptions out there of course.



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    Default Re: V-RAM vs RIGID RAM

    Just posted a Rigid Ram for sale if you haven't already got one. Yea - this is a real old thread, but you never know!



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    Default Re: V-RAM vs RIGID RAM

    [
    Quote Originally Posted by enzo11 View Post
    Just posted a Rigid Ram for sale if you haven't already got one. Yea - this is a real old thread, but you never know!


    This is a really old thread; you would have been better to have started a new thread

    Mactec54


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    Default Re: V-RAM vs RIGID RAM

    I had both styles of the mills - Rigid and V - as well a both Boss 6 and Boss 5 controls. The Boss 5 control machine stepped .001" each step, and the Boss 6 stepped .0005" per step. The mechanical difference was in the drive belt pulleys.

    As far as the surface finish difference between the V and Rigid, the rigid is indeed more rigid, but I've never really noticed a major difference in the surface finish that could be attributed to rigidity, and if I found on either machine that the surface finish wasn't what I wanted, I simply played with the controls and program until I got what I wanted. It WAS easier to get a good finish on the Boss 6 because of the small steps.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by mactec54 View Post
    [



    This is a really old thread; you would have been better to have started a new thread

    Yes, I already did.



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