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Thread: freejoth turret mill to cnc

  1. #13
    Registered Sterob's Avatar
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    Default Re: freejoth turret mill to cnc

    Quote Originally Posted by mechhamo View Post
    Hi joeavaerage thanks for the advice on the bob board i would like to configure inputs and outputs myself as well but i am not great at electronics so i would like to have a vfd output,it appears that the smooth stepper is the best choice it just depends on what bob board you use i suppose ,can anyone give me advice of the best breakout board to use with smooth stepper controller.

    regards wayne
    I wanted the neat package the MB2 offered and didn't feel the need to configure the I/O any particular way, so the CNCRoom package seemed right for me.

    You'll just have to do some reseach of the options Joeaverage has mentioned Wayne, and try to pick one
    I had some pics of my install but my HD died and it seems terminal......

    . Good luck.



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    Default Re: freejoth turret mill to cnc

    Quote Originally Posted by Sterob View Post
    If you decide to go with a ESS, have a look at this option.:

    https://www.cncroom.com/interface-bo...tf38kbqjaoa052
    Its a nice neat package with lots of I/O. No problems with the transaction at all.

    This is what I got ( newbie ) and I went with the Ethernet version as USB can be prone to interference issues is some cases.

    My original motion card was AKZ250 which is USB and generallly is ok , but the ESS is alot better.
    'smooth is the word'....

    Steve
    Its interesting to see what people choose. I liked the MB2, but as an instro by trade I detest those spring connectors, you either love them or hate them, and I am in the hate camp. I hate them so much I will avoid any product that uses them, now how sad is that!



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    Default Re: freejoth turret mill to cnc

    Quote Originally Posted by Pearo View Post
    Its interesting to see what people choose. I liked the MB2, but as an instro by trade I detest those spring connectors, you either love them or hate them, and I am in the hate camp. I hate them so much I will avoid any product that uses them, now how sad is that!
    I'm an Instrument Fitter too and I too was wary of the spring connectors. I understand why they used them. They save space and they apply strong constant spring pressure to the terminal.( maybe they are cheaper too?...lol)

    I use boot lace ferrules and depressed the terminals with a small terminal screwdriver so I got good insertion depth. I guess the springs may loose holding power over time, but they seemt to be ok so far.

    When I am fault finding at work , the first thing I do is check all the screw terminations anyway, and I DO find the occasional one loose, whethers its human error or otherwise...no way to tell, so have some I trust issues with both methods....lol

    Horses for courses......

    Let us know how you go anyway.

    Steve



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    Default Re: freejoth turret mill to cnc

    Hi,
    value for money the C10's are hard to beat.

    It would require a couple of extra components to make a PWM to analogue output and you would preferably use
    a MOSFET or BJT to switch a relay rather than relying on the TTL output IC of the breakout board to switch it.

    If you wish to go that way let me know and we could cook up some simple circuit for you.

    Compare 3 X C10's @ $23.00 = $69.00 vs $200 odd for the MB02......electronics may not be your forte....how about cost accounting?

    Craig



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    Default Re: freejoth turret mill to cnc

    Quote Originally Posted by joeavaerage View Post
    Hi,

    Compare 3 X C10's @ $23.00 = $69.00 vs $200 odd for the MB02......electronics may not be your forte....how about cost accounting?

    Craig

    Damn....you got me there.....lol

    Yes, there is a big difference in price..



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    Default Re: freejoth turret mill to cnc

    Biased opinion:
    W7, Mach3, ESS, 2 Homann Designs BoBs, Gecko drivers, 3:1 reduction motor to ball screw. NO internet connection!
    I am using 500 W brushed DC motors on all axes. The power required (per axis) is rarely above 100 W. 1.8kW sounds like a massive overkill to me.
    Spindle is a KBWT-26 DC drive to a Baldor 600 W brushed DC motor. Unlike the Chinese VFDs and 3-phase motors, this combination is totally bomb-proof. Driving 10 mm carbide cutters I would rarely get to 300 W.

    Cheers
    Roger



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    Default Re: freejoth turret mill to cnc

    Hi,
    biased opinion:
    Windows 7 Embedded, Mach4, ESS, 2 Homan Design BoBs, Vexta 230VAC input 5 phase stepper drivers, Vexta 5 phase steppers with 10:1 low lash (2 arcmin)
    planetary reduction, C5 20mmX 5mm ballcrews, Bosch Rexroth 15mm linear rails/cars. High speed spindle 800W Mechatron and Delta VFD, low speed high torque
    spindle 1.8kW Allen Bradley servo ( 3500 rpm 6.1Nm cont).

    Craig



  8. #20
    *Registered User* mechhamo's Avatar
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    Default Re: freejoth turret mill to cnc

    Hi rodger my reason for the 1.8 kw ac motors is because ac motors are less efficient than a their dc counterparts, and i will be milling engines with a lot of weight and mass to move, as well as i do not want to waste money on undersized motors but like you said i could get away with 1 hp motors (750 watts) considering the ball screw pitch will be 20mm with a gear reduction of 2,1 i think it would be ok.
    another reason i went with ac motors is less maintenance and no interference from the contact of brushes and commutator as well as not been limited with torque and speed there is no doubt that ac servo motors are a better choice.

    regards wayne



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    Default Re: freejoth turret mill to cnc

    Hi,

    i think i will go with the 1.8kw dmm ac servo motors and drives
    They are great and powerful servos.

    Hi rodger my reason for the 1.8 kw ac motors is because ac motors are less efficient than a their dc counterparts
    That is incorrect, if anything the torque density of an AC servo exceeds that of a DC one.
    I must say I agree with Roger, I think 1.8kW as axis servos is over the top.
    We have a customer who has an aging but huge double column Okuma mill and its axis servos are 750W and it rattles through its work with
    500kg on the table.

    ac motors is less maintenance and no interference from the contact of brushes and commutator
    Yes that is certainly true. What you may not be aware of is that the modern AC servo drives have control options which are light years, I mean
    LIGHT YEARS ahead of all the old DC stuff. You are in for a pleasant surprise with those DMM's

    Craig



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    Default Re: freejoth turret mill to cnc

    Hi,
    maybe I should explain my assertion:

    if anything the torque density of an AC servo exceeds that of a DC one
    These may be called AC servos but they are not AC in the traditional sense.

    AC induction motors are somewhat less efficient than DC motors of the same size, because some of the applied current is required to induce
    the magnetic field in the rotor and therefore unavailable to generate torque..

    An AC servo motor however is a synchronous machine. Its rotor is permanently magnetized, and by rare earth magnets with fields of
    close to 1 Telsa. Thus NONE of the applied current is required to magnetize the rotor. Additionally the algorithm for applying the current,
    called field oriented control, applies the current in such a manner that is always at 900 to the rotor field and therefore always
    maximally producing torque from the lowest possible current. Thus the torque density of a modern AC servo is as good or better than a
    DC servo. Additionally the heat loss in a DC servo is in the rotor (difficult to cool) whereas its in the stator (easy to cool) in an AC servo.

    There are a couple of YouTube videos posted by Texas Instruments about Field Oriented Control, truly fascinating, it gives any control engineer
    a sweaty palms in anticipation.

    Craig



  11. #23
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    Default Re: freejoth turret mill to cnc

    I got nuthin......



    lol



  12. #24
    *Registered User* mechhamo's Avatar
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    Default Re: freejoth turret mill to cnc

    hi

    i think i need to a bit more research on the bob board, but i would like to thank everyone that has replied to my posts and as always i have learnt a lot, and your help is very much appreciated.

    regards wayne



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