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MBG
03-16-2005, 10:24 PM
My question is about how do you learn how to work some of these machines? I know how to work a manual lathe,knee mill, surface grinder. I went to schoo for this. I know how to write basic g-code programs want to learn how to do mastercam but my question is how do you learn how to run some of these machines they have out there. I would really like to learn how to run a screw machine. I have been looking at pictures of some and boy does it look complex. Is there any kind of book or anything I could read to get more knowledge about it so I could work it. But how does a guy get knowledge about these machines?

psychomill
03-17-2005, 01:09 AM
You could read books, do some tutorials and maybe pick up some basic understanding of machine tools, technique, methods, etc. But IMO, the only tried and true way to learn... HANDS ON EXPERIENCE. How do you attain that? Not knowing your current situation, I'll just list them.

1. If you're currently at a shop that has these equipment or capacity, try to get some time on them (even if it might involve some of your own 'time').

2. Take an entry level position at a shop that will teach you and show you these machines and or cad/cam systems.

3. More schooling. Many Junior colleges and trade schools out there that teach cnc, machining fundamentals, and programming. Some better than others so ask around to people who may have done this.

These are just a few things. Most of all... ask questions! I admit that there are a lot of machinists who don't like to "give away their secrets or knowledge". I say screw them (flame2) . There are however (I'm an optimist) many of us who are more than willing (given the time) to teach and show someone the ropes. Most machines aren't nearly as complex as they look. If anything, they're just intimidating. It's what you do on a machine that makes things complex. But that also comes with experience.

Talk to friends, co-workers and such about learning and expanding your horizons. Remember that you and only you have the 'total control'. No questions are stupid so long as you're honest about it. (perplexing maybe... but not stupid :D )

Good luck, HTH... and continue using this forum. Many of us willing to help out. :cheers: :cheers:

ynneb
03-17-2005, 03:40 AM
Find a willing mentor.
I have one, I am one.
Be prepeared to recieve and give knowledge.
Read as much as you can on the forums, even if it does not make sence at first.
Post questions, even the sorts of questions you may think other will consider dumb.
It wasnt that long ago that I didnt even know what a CNC machine was, let alone build one. This forum will really help you.

MBG
03-17-2005, 06:42 AM
thanks guys and physcomill. I am in a community college right now for cnc. They have several emco lathes and mill to learn on. That is how I learned my g-code. The machine I really want to learn is a screw machine right now. I think they look interesting. Is there any books on the basic concept of the machine for me to get a good understanding about hte machine. If not a book how about online information.

thanks for the help so far.
-garrett

joe1970
03-17-2005, 08:49 PM
I started out in the industry on screw machines as far as hands on experiance you can really learn alot in running one but as psychomill stated the best way to learn is HANDS ON . In running and setting up one you will learn how to grind you own tooling set your timing and basic machine maintainance (which comes in handy on the shop floor) There are a couple types of screw machines the swiss type (esco ) and the six spindle new brightons or greenfields both utilizied for monster numbers of part runs. let me check back into some old toolboxes of mine and see if i have some old info on both of them . if i still have it i would be more than happy to send it to you. Always willing to help out someone eagar for knoweldge I can share.

MBG
03-17-2005, 09:36 PM
What are some good machines to check out?

joe1970
03-17-2005, 10:03 PM
there are alot of diffrent machines esco which is a swiss type machine i.e. the tooling moves not the stock. there are greenfields and new brightons which are six spindle machines and the stock rotates and each spindle does a diffrent operation thru indexing these can be enourmous machines which can take six lengthes of up to 3 inch bar stock. It has been fifteen years since i have been in a screw machine house I am sure with the way the industry has advanced the on set of cnc has taken over in some places but i know of at least there are still at least 15 houses in operation in the milwaukee wisc. area which is where my shop is currently located . I have been out of it for some time cnc is the way of the future

MBG
03-18-2005, 06:39 AM
there are alot of diffrent machines esco which is a swiss type machine i.e. the tooling moves not the stock. there are greenfields and new brightons which are six spindle machines and the stock rotates and each spindle does a diffrent operation thru indexing these can be enourmous machines which can take six lengthes of up to 3 inch bar stock. It has been fifteen years since i have been in a screw machine house I am sure with the way the industry has advanced the on set of cnc has taken over in some places but i know of at least there are still at least 15 houses in operation in the milwaukee wisc. area which is where my shop is currently located . I have been out of it for some time cnc is the way of the future

thanks a lot I will research that. This is pretty cool