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PoiToi
07-07-2009, 02:31 PM
Hello all, another question for the boards....

Does anyone have a recommendation for a rigid tap holder? I need a 3/4" shank one. We just got a new machine with rigid tapping and i'm having a heck of a time trying to find a good rigid tap holder for it... I've read that just putting the tap in a collet isn't the best idea.

thanks in advance! =)

UK-Engineer
07-08-2009, 02:17 AM
Hello

If your machine has rigid tapping then a simple rego collet and drill chuck as you would use for a standard drill is all you need. Special holders like spring ones are not required with rigid tapping

ProProcess
07-08-2009, 09:13 AM
You will be fine using the ER type collets.
The "negeative" to using these is for 1/2" and larger applications, as the collet system does not have enough clamping force for those conditions.
Anything that you would do on a swiss will be fine in the ER collets.
HTH, Good luck!

PixMan
07-09-2009, 06:03 AM
You will be fine using the ER type collets.
The "negeative" to using these is for 1/2" and larger applications, as the collet system does not have enough clamping force for those conditions.
Anything that you would do on a swiss will be fine in the ER collets.
HTH, Good luck!

The ER collets are capable of holding and using 1/2" and larger taps. You should be buying tap holder collets for them though, as they have the square at the bottom of the bores to hold on better. Don't use regular ER collets for anything but the smallest taps.

That said, most CNC Swiss machines take ER16 size, so you're limited to 10mm shanks. Those are too small to resist the torque load of say a 10mm form tap in stainless steel. Other than Maier ML series and a couple of bigger (32mm) Star and Tsugami machines, the limiting factor for size gets to be the available spindle torque. Machine builders will often tell you their limit is an 8mm or 5/16" tap. Their spindles are often belt drive, and just can't handle low-speed/high-torque loads. Most machines with rigid tapping are direct drive and have motors good for this.

Superman
07-09-2009, 06:19 AM
If your machine has rigid tapping then a simple rego collet and drill chuck as you would use for a standard drill is all you need.

Never use a drill chuck for a tap or endmill holder if you don't want your drills to run true in it again.

I've seen very expensive chucks trashed because an operator thought he could side mill with a 3/8" endmill

ProProcess
07-09-2009, 07:50 AM
Here is the Rego Tap Collet (http://www.rego-fix.com/screwmachine/taprigid.asp)... with the square in the bottom

ProProcess
07-09-2009, 07:58 AM
Never use a drill chuck for a tap or endmill holder if you don't want your drills to run true in it again.

I've seen very expensive chucks trashed because an operator thought he could side mill with a 3/8" endmill

Though this is completley true...
I think this is a terminolgy thing, I believe when the poster refered to "simple rego collet and drill chuck" they were referring to the Collet and Collet Chuck system, not a conventional "drill chuck" like on a drill press or knee mill.
But I may be wrong.

UK-Engineer
07-09-2009, 11:54 AM
I think this is a terminolgy thing, I believe when the poster refered to "simple rego collet and drill chuck" they were referring to the Collet and Collet Chuck system, not a conventional "drill chuck" like on a drill press or knee mill.
But I may be wrong.[/QUOTE]

You're quite right - i merely meant that with option of rigid tapping a conventional er collet and holder are sufficient as opposed to dedicated tapping sprung collet or drill chuck as poster said. Others have recommended er collets with squares in the bottom to locate on tap and these are indeed good but i find standard collets are fine. When you go above a certain size (approx M10/M12 in steel) on 32mm capacity machine, then even with rigid peck tapping it becomes more of a lack of spindle power issue than how the tool is held.

I'm finding thread milling is becoming more and more popular as cutting any types of threads on material like inconel etc is extremely challenging to attain a stable reliable process with acceptable tool life