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DeusExMachina
01-16-2009, 02:56 PM
I've all but decided on a Taig over an X2 (the 2019ER comes out just a little cheaper then an X2 would be after conversion kits/belt drive, and a lot cheaper in regards to work required to get it running).

I'm mostly going to be working in aluminum, 6061/7075 with relatively smaller cutters (3/8" and less). What kind of removal rates is the Taig capable of with aluminum?

How does the Taig handle 1018/A36/12L14? I'd like to try machining steel, but I'm worried this tiny little machine won't handle steel very well. If the machine can cut steel, what kind of removal rates are we talking?

Anyone have any tips for feed/speed/depth of cut this little thing is capable of taking in various materials?

Last how do the leadscrews hold up to semi production work (ie 8 hours a day 2-3 days a week)?

TOC Admin
01-16-2009, 03:25 PM
I cutout alot of 1/8 alum sheet pieces with engraving on them..

I use a 1/8 ball EM to engrave and cutout at full depth in 1 pass at 8-10 ipm feed..plunge at 4 ipm

have used a 1/4 EM in alum .... .100 depth 8 ipm feed no problem

have not tried steel yet

fretsman
01-16-2009, 05:09 PM
I cutout alot of 1/8 alum sheet pieces with engraving on them..

I use a 1/8 ball EM to engrave and cutout at full depth in 1 pass at 8-10 ipm feed..plunge at 4 ipm

have used a 1/4 EM in alum .... .100 depth 8 ipm feed no problem

have not tried steel yet

Is this without coolant, Brian?

Dave

MechanoMan
01-16-2009, 08:22 PM
Yeah what is the limiting factor for these?

From what everybody says, Taig is a very "stiff" mill and isn't the body going to flex due to cutter force. At least that's what they say, I have no means to compare.

If you have good motors and drives, the cutting head shouldn't even be able to provide enough resistance to stall the motors before the cutter breaks, should it? I've not tried to use large hogging-out cutters much.

Is the spindle motor's hp a limiting factor? Or possibly, more like the belt drive slipping?

AFAIK it should come down to cooling and chip removal and cutter properties, doesn't it? I know flood coolant is the gold standard for chip removal as well as cooling, needed for high speed metal removal.

Small cutters, like 1/8" or especially fine-point engravers, can break if pushed too fast. Bigger 1/4" stuff wouldn't snap but like with carbides you can break the teeth off. Carbide's quite sharp, and retains its sharpness, but is somewhat brittle.

DeusExMachina
01-16-2009, 09:32 PM
I imagine the limiting factor for these small machines is really their size. I know people say these are stiff, but in comparison to what? a 2x4? These aren't multi-ton machines and I know an X3 should be far and above more rigid then the Taig.

Is this machine rigid enough to take it to the edge of the spindle's capabilities? I kind of doubt it.

TOC Admin
01-17-2009, 02:31 AM
Is this without coolant, Brian?

Dave

No ..With Coolant, or else it would gall up on you, you could get away with a spray bottle but its a pain, flood is much better

This was when I was making Bike parts...

fretsman
01-17-2009, 07:55 AM
No ..With Coolant, or else it would gall up on you, you could get away with a spray bottle but its a pain, flood is much better

This was when I was making Bike parts...

Yep, thought so, as galling is defintely an issue with aluminum. Your flood coolant system will come in very handy in the future -;)

Dave

Jeff-Birt
01-17-2009, 11:15 PM
A friend of mine is finishing up his PhD work (having to do with failure predictions). He is removing all the lubrication from the spindle bearings and taking 1/8" cuts from 6061 aluminum plates using a mist cooler. He runs this solid for between 13-18 hours before bearing failure. The first one we did took 30 hours but we didn't get all the grease out of the bearings. Even with abusing the machine to the point of the spindle bearings being ground to dust and locking up, it keeps on going. The only thing (other than the bearings :) ) which has suffered any undo wear is the drive belt. For some reason a belt won't survive more than 3-4 spindle bearing lock-ups!

I tease my friend that he has all the troubles trying to destroy the spindle bearings because they are indestructible Turkish bearings (my buddy is Turkish.) :)

They are a very, very tough little machine.

From Taig's own website:


This is the machine you don't have to baby. The Micro Mill is a rugged precision instrument that has plenty of rigidity. Its machined, ground and stabilized steel bed has a life-time ball bearing spindle, coupled with a six speed positive vee belt drive. Spindle speeds in geometric progression from 525-5200 RPM (CR version 1000 - 10000 rpm) provide the power to "HOG" 1/8 inch cuts in mild steel or the speed and precision to "dust" a few tenths (compare that to other mills of similar size on the market, you can't!).

After he's all done with the aluminum he is going to run the same test with stainless. I'll let you know how it works out.