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View Full Version : Anyone sell an Enclosure for the Mill



cnccustom
12-14-2008, 03:15 PM
I want to purchase a Enclosure for my Taig Mill, I know I can make one but barely have time to make parts, Plus I want it Nice if you know what I mean

I seen IM services makes one but its not wide enough for the Table to go side to side..

DonFrambach
12-14-2008, 04:12 PM
There's a guy with an interesting blog at http://www.nyccnc.com who has a real nice enclosure that I believe he purchased from http://www.lococnc.com

link to his enclosure:
http://www.nyccnc.com/Herbie/HERBIES_BLOG/Entries/2007/12/1_Enclosure_is_done!.html

Good luck

Don

fretsman
12-14-2008, 04:17 PM
I'm doing this as well but I'm still in pencil sketch mode at this point.

Will you be doing a coolant setup?

Dave

cnccustom
12-14-2008, 07:33 PM
I'm doing this as well but I'm still in pencil sketch mode at this point.

Will you be doing a coolant setup?

Dave

Yes using a pond pump...

cnccustom
12-14-2008, 09:05 PM
There's a guy with an interesting blog at http://www.nyccnc.com who has a real nice enclosure that I believe he purchased from http://www.lococnc.com

link to his enclosure:
http://www.nyccnc.com/Herbie/HERBIES_BLOG/Entries/2007/12/1_Enclosure_is_done!.html

Good luck

Don

I went to the lococnc site but did not see any,,sent them an email

imserv
12-15-2008, 12:03 PM
I seen IM services makes one but its not wide enough for the Table to go side to side..

What size do you need to fit a Taig?

Fred Smith - IMService
http://www.imsrv.com

fretsman
12-15-2008, 12:08 PM
The one I was after was 30" High X 26" deep, X 42" width.

Dave

cnccustom
12-15-2008, 01:36 PM
What size do you need to fit a Taig?

Fred Smith - IMService
http://www.imsrv.com

We need 42 inches wide for the Taig


as fretsman says 30" High X 26" deep, X 42" width would be perfect

imserv
12-15-2008, 03:37 PM
The one I was after was 30" High X 26" deep, X 42" width.

Dave

We could do it in the 5 sided, plexi, with aluminum T-slot frame.

Similar to this:36W x 24D x 24H enclosure (http://www.cadcamcadcam.com/machineenclosure24x36x245sidedtransparentwithaluminumframe.aspx)

Your size is probably too big for a top hinged door. A vertical slider would probably be better. Would that work?

Flood coolant might be a problem, but if you put the enlcosure on a non-porous tabletop, you could seal around the inside frame with RTV, and install a drain hole. With a mister, you might need to install some windshield wipers:)

Fred Smith - IMService

cnccustom
12-15-2008, 03:42 PM
after some searching I will make my own with 80/20 material and 1/4 inch coroplast for the sides and back ,plexi glass front doors, Thinking of leaving the top open , not sure yet

Thanks

fretsman
12-15-2008, 04:02 PM
We could do it in the 5 sided, plexi, with aluminum T-slot frame.

Similar to this:36W x 24D x 24H enclosure (http://www.cadcamcadcam.com/machineenclosure24x36x245sidedtransparentwithaluminumframe.aspx)

Your size is probably too big for a top hinged door. A vertical slider would probably be better. Would that work?

Flood coolant might be a problem, but if you put the enlcosure on a non-porous tabletop, you could seal around the inside frame with RTV, and install a drain hole. With a mister, you might need to install some windshield wipers:)

Fred Smith - IMService


Thanks, Fred, I'll give you a shout when I get closer to doing this if I don't end up doing it on my own-

Dave

Anokiernan
01-08-2009, 09:53 AM
after some searching I will make my own with 80/20 material and 1/4 inch coroplast for the sides and back ,plexi glass front doors, Thinking of leaving the top open , not sure yet

Thanks

If your going to run flood coolant don't leave the top open. On my first enclosure I was running flood coolant at up to 4gpm.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v697/anokiernan/CNC/IMG_0283.jpg
Depending on the part geometry, tool speed, and flow rate, the coolant would easily spray up to the height of motor, sometimes higher. When I disassembled the enclosure the top panel was covered in dried up coolant (I run water based KoolMist 77). Granted I've had some rather unusual setups on my mill but in your case I'd still suggest taking the "better safe than sorry" approach
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v697/anokiernan/CNC/IMG_2011.jpg

Jeff-Birt
01-09-2009, 09:48 AM
OK, I have to ask, 4 GPM and 8 (yes eight) nozzles? Perhaps a bit of overkill?:) What are you cutting?

Unless you are cooling your coolant I would think that your putting as much or more heat into it through the pump as what your making with the tool. As a point of comparison, I built a small testbed for a research group here at the university. It constantly recirculates 20 gallons of water at about 10 GPM through 1" pipe. After 2-3 hours the water temp is near 150 deg F.

Anokiernan
01-09-2009, 01:01 PM
OK, I have to ask, 4 GPM and 8 (yes eight) nozzles? Perhaps a bit of overkill?:) What are you cutting?

Unless you are cooling your coolant I would think that your putting as much or more heat into it through the pump as what your making with the tool. As a point of comparison, I built a small testbed for a research group here at the university. It constantly recirculates 20 gallons of water at about 10 GPM through 1" pipe. After 2-3 hours the water temp is near 150 deg F.

It's a fair question, maybe this will clear it up for you...
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v697/anokiernan/CNC/IMG_2010.jpg
My mill is setup to be used as both a CNC mill, and a gang tool lathe. It only takes about 2 minutes to switch between setups. 7 of the nozzles are mounted on the gang tool lathe setup's coolant manifold. This allows me to adjust the coolant pressure/flowrate and angle for each turning tool involved in the process. When this picture was taken I was still waiting for another pack of nozzles to arrive hence there's a few missing. When the taig is being used as a CNC mill it has 2 nozzles attached (only 1 is attached in the pictures) to a coolant manifold on the spindle. Coolant is useless unless it is getting to the cutting interface between the end mill and the part. With the pressure/flow rate my system provides, I'm able to adjust the location and pressure/flow rate of the coolant nozzles to suit the particular part being made.

For example; With only 1 coolant nozzle, flooding the tool from it's right hand side, when cutting from left to right into the side of a block, the coolant will be blocked from the actual cutting area of the endmill by the top surface of the block. While this does cool the work piece, the cooling system is failing in it's primary purpose to lubricate the interface between the shearing material and the cutting tool.

So in short more nozzles provide more options for proper cooling, lubrication, and chip removal.

Also the pump in use is a non-contact vane design (essentially a pond pump), my best guess is that the pump you used for that experiment was a centrifugal pump coupled to a decent sized motor? Also the pump itself is fully submerged in 5 gallons of coolant, increasing the surface area related to heat transfer significantly. Thus far just based on observation, the coolant remains just above room temperature when in operation, even after long 6-8 hour programs in 6061.

You gave me a good idea for new enclosure i'm working on now though. Adding a force convection cooling system on the high pressure side of the pump would help drop the temp. Thanks, it was something that had not crossed my mind.

Jeff-Birt
01-09-2009, 02:59 PM
Ah! That explains a lot. My own preference might be two use one or two longer nozzles pointed up at the workpiece (but hitting tip of tool), I'm glad you found a solution that works for you though. More than one way to skin a cat and all that.


my best guess is that the pump you used for that experiment was a centrifugal pump coupled to a decent sized motor? ..snip...Thus far just based on observation, the coolant remains just above room temperature when in operation, even after long 6-8 hour programs in 6061.

Yes it is a centrifugal pump, as that is the pump design they needed to test, as I recall it is only a 0.5~1hp motor. I would be interested the measures temperature of your current set up, compared to when you add a cooler. One easy solution would be to find a used Miller tig-torch cooler. They are about the size of a small six-pack sized igloo cooler. They have a built in pump, fan and radiator.

Anokiernan
01-10-2009, 06:11 PM
I would be interested the measures temperature of your current set up, compared to when you add a cooler. One easy solution would be to find a used Miller tig-torch cooler. They are about the size of a small six-pack sized igloo cooler. They have a built in pump, fan and radiator.

Well I'll be using the pump I already have, it's worked outstanding thus far and is robust enough to handle small particulate in the coolant. I was thinking about using something like this:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835108098
coupled with 3 x 120mm fans, it should be sufficient to maintain the flow rates and further cool the fluid. The only thing I haven't figured out yet is how I'm going to filter the coolant to remove all of the swarf and particulate so that it does not enter the radiator.

fretsman
01-11-2009, 10:12 AM
Didn't you used to have a video on youtube for the gang set up on the Taig mill? I bet that would've helped iilustrate what you were trying to convey with your coolant setup.

Always loved that one :)

Dave

Anokiernan
01-11-2009, 11:40 AM
Didn't you used to have a video on youtube for the gang set up on the Taig mill? I bet that would've helped iilustrate what you were trying to convey with your coolant setup.

Always loved that one :)

Dave

Yup I sure do:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0d2AcT_rJig

This was one of the bigger reasons why I'm upgrading my taig now with larger steppers, a new controller, ball screws, etc... The slow rapid and feed speeds have finally gotten to me and I want more :D

cmanning
01-11-2009, 01:00 PM
This was one of the bigger reasons why I'm upgrading my taig now with larger steppers, a new controller, ball screws, etc... The slow rapid and feed speeds have finally gotten to me and I want more :D

I'd love to hear about your experiences upgrading the Taig with ball screws when you get around to it. I'm happy with the setup the way it is now, but I can see wanting more eventually :)

Chris

Anokiernan
01-11-2009, 04:48 PM
I'd love to hear about your experiences upgrading the Taig with ball screws when you get around to it. I'm happy with the setup the way it is now, but I can see wanting more eventually :)

Chris

I'll certainly do so, I'm actually taking the taig apart right now to measure some of the features. It's looking quite doable to me, has anyone done this before? I haven't been able to find any others who have converted the taig to ball screws. Granted it will be only a marginal increase in performance over the 1/2-20 leadscrews with preloaded nuts, it will increase rapid speeds outrageously while maintaining or even improving the thrust capabilities and repeatability using 425 oz/in steppers.

fretsman
01-11-2009, 04:52 PM
has anyone done this before?

Why don't you start a new thread and I'll add a link to someone who has done this. Unfortunately there's no documentation but the pics are pretty nice.

This way we may attract more people that may have done this since they'll be able to see it in the title.

Dave

Anokiernan
01-11-2009, 04:55 PM
Why don't you start a new thread and I'll add a link to someone who has done this. Unfortunately there's no documentation but the pics are pretty nice.

This way we may attract more people that may have done this since they'll be able to see it in the title.

Dave

Agreed, I didn't intended to wander off topic

Hirudin
01-11-2009, 06:35 PM
...
the coolant would easily spray up to the height of motor, sometimes higher.
...
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v697/anokiernan/CNC/IMG_2011.jpg
Well no wonder, when one of the nozzles is pointed straight up!

Just kidding of course, I like your distribution block with individual screws for individual pressure regulation. I'd like to do something similar when I set mine up.

LeeWay
01-11-2009, 07:28 PM
That's a pretty cool machine. I can understand why you want more though. ;)
Taigs are surely fine little machines.
My enclosure is more of a fence or stall. I just use a HF solvent tank (3.5 gallon) for my mill. The width is 42" by 36" deep and maybe 20" tall at front. A little higher on the sides.
A very small amount does sling out every now and then. I only use one spout, though I do have three. This is all I need to cut aluminum at 6600 RPM and mild steel at 3200. DOC is normally .025". Sometimes less.
I have always used Koolmist 77. It works well for me, but has a drawback. It is not kind to polycarbonate. It can actually seep into edges and drilled holes. It eventually impregnates the stuff and makes it nearly as brittle as charcoal. Not sure why this is.
I haven't done anymore experimenting. I still use it as my front cover.
I think perhaps if you use the scratch resistant kind and sealed any holes drilled, it may be okay.
With the regular stuff, if you use a torch and flamekiss the edges and any holes, that may help seal it too. It appeared to always infiltrate around drilled holes and rough cut edges.
A couple other guys have mentioned this as well here somewhere.

If I was going to run a mister, I would absolutely enclose the thing. That mist is notorious for getting on everything else in the shop.
I simply don't have room for a full enclosure. Otherwise, that is what I would have. It would at least help with the noise as well.
Just a few thoughts from someone that has built his second enclosure.