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View Full Version : What's in the perfect home CNC book ???



Graham S
09-01-2004, 06:55 PM
My question is, what would be in the perfect home CNC book?

What I am trying to do is create a virtual table of contents. What is it you feel you don't understand? What things seem more art that science? etc etc ???

I should mention that I am not planning on writing such a book and if I did it would be a free download.

Graham

Graham S
09-01-2004, 06:57 PM
I will sort of compile the suggestions in this post, will re-jig as we go along:

Fundementals:

* What is force
* What is torque
* What is (mechanical) power
* cartesian coordinates

Motion:

* Step and direction control
* How to choose leadscrew-gearing-motor combos
* stepper motors
* servo motors
* Stepper or servo?
* axis movement
* 4/5 axis

Mechanics:

* Motor couplings
* Mounting leadscrews
* Linear slide types
* Homemade rail configurations
* construction materials
* accuracy considerations
* alignment methods
* spindle motors
* What is stiffness, what makes things stiff
* Backlash
* Does accuracy always matter, what is it? What is precision?


CAD/CAM process:

*What is CAD
*What is CAM
*G-code

Electronics:

* Motor power supplies

Machining:

* Force requirements for cutting
* Feeds and speeds
* Roughing and finishing stratagies
* Cutter types
* Climb vs conventional
* router types
* Tool offset
* Work table types
* Vacuum chucks/tables


Apendix:

Glossary

arvidb
09-01-2004, 07:03 PM
* What is force

* What is torque

* What is (mechanical) power

* Motor power supplies

These are some things that often appear as questions in one way or the other.

Arvid

Konstantin
09-01-2004, 07:12 PM
There is a good read about CNC machine construction in www.thermwood.com, namely "Three Dimensional Trimming and Machining" wich discuss about general CNC machine components and goes indepth on many hidden issues, mainly hard learned on practice and often overlooked when building the machine.

I have mentioned this book once but I believe it deserves another mention. Maybe a few ideas in Thermwood's documents will result benefical for the purposes of this book.


Konstantin

High Seas
09-01-2004, 07:26 PM
Graham - I applude and support however I can. I ask for some focus. I'll offer the following to (hopefully clarify):
WHO is the target audience? Rank beginner - or sometime user to full time machinist?
WHY are they interested? Hobby, part time home-based business, just like machines and tools -HARGGGH HARGHH.
HOW much can they spend? Time and Money.
HOW big based on the what'cha gonna do with it, but also how much space and power available.
WHAT are their skills? NONE - to advanced Machinist looking for a hobby machine, or to go into business and save some by DIY.
WHAT will they be building? How much resolution do they need, what sort of precission and how accurate their finished product?
WHICH form of machine - Obviously based on WHAT, WHY and HOW; but is it a PCB board drilling machine - or a 18x9 foot router? Is it a LATHE conversion or a Plasma Cutter? A laser based engraving machine or something to cut dog collars and engrave ballpoint pens on?
HOW do they match servo/stepper to their needs, Power and torque, and alll.

Maybe I missed your point on review - the perfect Home CNC book? If it is for someone that has a machine, DIY or bought off eBay, there are a different set of interests I'd propose too.

ROUGHING Pass and Final Cut - thoughts and techniques.
Types of tools used on a router for a variety of cuts.
Certainly feed and spped are alwyas a concern but whats the smarts on up cut or down.
Tips to set up and alternatives to milling the parts - there was a great post a few weeks back that gave a good hint on "faking" 3D by how you plunge Z as I recall.

And as I type at my 3 works per fortnight I see Konstantin may have a lead - so I'll post this rather long-winded maybe useless item.
But ya got my juices goin' :cheers: Jim

Graham S
09-01-2004, 07:47 PM
Good point Arvid.

Thanks for the heads up Konstantin

Highseas, assume it is the CNC bible. Just put what YOU want in it.

Graham

duluthboat
09-01-2004, 08:11 PM
• understanding CAD
• understanding CAM
• understanding cartesian coordinates
• understanding G-code
To add a few.
Gary

pminmo
09-01-2004, 08:45 PM
The real bible is a BIG book. How about starting with DIYers Wood Router bible, reflecting who would read this forum. --> "DIY CNC Wood Router Discussion"
*stepper motors
*servo motors
*router types
*axis movement
*construction materials
*accuracy considerations
*speed considerations
*spindle motors
*alignment methods
*TIP's
*COTS hardware and suppliers

Phil

Graham S
09-01-2004, 08:58 PM
Think of it as a bible that cuts to the chase, not a long winded text book but something that captures the essence of home CNC including the fundementals that form the back bone and the handy tidbits that form the, err, elbows!

Again, just put what you want or NEED in it

* What is stiffness, what makes things stiff
* Backlash
* Does accuracy always matter
* Work table types
* Vacuum chucks/tables

duluthboat
09-01-2004, 09:35 PM
* Speeds and feeds
* Tool offset
* Cutter selection

A few more, Gary

chuckknigh
09-02-2004, 12:25 AM
Why can't my 3-axis machine undercut, if it can reach any point in 3-space? That wasn't immediately obvious, to me, when I started. Leads in nicely to a discussion on 4th and 5th axes.

-- Chuck Knight

ynneb
09-02-2004, 03:03 AM
I think that in any book written for any level you cant assume that the reader knows anything. A real thorough glossary of terms is a must.

ESjaavik
09-02-2004, 05:30 AM
My question is, what would be in the perfect home CNC book?

Building one I assume.

You could start by doing a translation of this into English:
Andreas Hirsch: Werkzeugmaschinen - Grundlagen
Viewegs Fachbücher der Technik
ISBN-3-528-04950-2
For those of you who understand German, go buy it. No, don't go, run!
Of course we're not building commercial production machines, but it is useful to know the principles so we can apply them where it is possible.

There you have all the basic theory. Then you need to add some info on how to apply that within the "home" constraints. Or which corners you can cut without falling off the edge if you like.

If you mean using it, I don't know. I'd like to though.

arvidb
09-02-2004, 05:33 AM
I have written a text, "What motor, screw and gearing should I chose?", that explains just that, along with definitions of the basic mechanical units used. It looks very boring :tired:, 9 pages without any pictures. But might be interesting anyway for those who really want to learn?

I thought I would post it in some appropriate forum here, but got stuck since I cannot convert it to PDF (I only have PDFWriter that cannot cope with some characters used). If anyone's got PDF Distiller and knows how to use it, I could send you the text and then we could post it, then perhaps somebody would like to add some pictures or something?

Arvid

Graham S
09-02-2004, 06:23 AM
This is great chaps, keep it up

Graham S
09-02-2004, 06:29 AM
Arvid, have you considered Ghostview?

If you want me to try send it to eexgs at nottingham dot ac dot uk

Graham

ESjaavik
09-02-2004, 08:50 AM
Arvid: Mail it to me and I'll try with Win2Pdf.

arvidb
09-02-2004, 09:04 AM
Thank you both for helping! I downloaded Ghostview, and after fighting some with the settings it worked beautifully!

I have now posted the PDF file in the CNC Wood Router FAQ section.

Arvid

High Seas
09-02-2004, 09:32 AM
I have now posted the PDF file in the CNC Wood Router FAQ section.Arvid
Did I miss the clue to its location - or maybe its hung up in loading?

arvidb
09-02-2004, 10:30 AM
I think that forum is moderated, so it might take a while for it to appear. Or?

Arvid

Graham S
09-04-2004, 02:31 PM
Tramming, alignment and testing
Timming belt drives
Extruded Ali construction
Steel Construction
Ballscrew end machining
Leadscrew types
Machine configurations
machine wiring
E-stops and safety
Dust collection and Enclosures
VFDs
Encoders
Software flow CAD -> motors

I hope folks will keep posting as they remember yet more stuff that they know or want to know

Graham

dsquire
06-29-2007, 02:24 AM
I have written a text, "What motor, screw and gearing should I chose?", that explains just that, along with definitions of the basic mechanical units used. It looks very boring :tired:, 9 pages without any pictures. But might be interesting anyway for those who really want to learn?

I thought I would post it in some appropriate forum here, but got stuck since I cannot convert it to PDF (I only have PDFWriter that cannot cope with some characters used). If anyone's got PDF Distiller and knows how to use it, I could send you the text and then we could post it, then perhaps somebody would like to add some pictures or something?

Arvid


Arvid

I have just discovered this forum/thread and think that a CNC bible would be an excellent idea for someone that is just starting out and has a 1001 questions.

I have searched for your "What motor, screw and gearing should I chose?" text on this forum and have been unable to find it. Would it be possible to repost it or provide a link as to where I might get it.

I would like to gather what I can and put it into some kind of CNC Bible. Your document would only be used with your permission of course and with disclaimers.

Don