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View Full Version : A very unexciting project..........



ynneb
08-29-2004, 01:49 AM
We all love to see great routers and machine projects, but if you're like me, you neglect to smaller elememts that go on such machines.

It is about time for me to make a dust collection system for my machine.
Up until now I have just been vacuuming up after each job.

During the weekily shopping I have gone down the cleaning product section and noticed the cheap dustpan brushes. About 2 dollars each. I have thought if I bought 4 of them and cut off the handles, I could then screw them to a piece of MDF to form a square.
I would then cut two hole in the mdf, one for the router bit and the other for the vacuum. The other addition to this project I was thinking about was to have an air stream that was aimed at the router bit. That way it would help to cool the tip and also stir up the cut particals so they could be sucked up easier.

I will post some highly stimulating pictures once I have built this project. Please dont hassle me for these pictures any sooner, since i dont want to rush this project and get it wrong.

Does anyone have any suggestions b4 i actually get started?

DSL PWR
08-29-2004, 11:23 AM
I'd think you would need a stiff brush to make this work. The brush would also need to have a tight pattern. Why not use plexi glass so you can see what's going on?

Patrick2by4
08-29-2004, 03:14 PM
Hey Benny
shopbot has something similar for their machine, I was planning to use some of the elements in their vacuum scheme in my machine. I've also seen this type of setup in other machines. (I like the clear lucite plate they use)

ger21
08-29-2004, 04:04 PM
I'd think you would need a stiff brush to make this work. The brush would also need to have a tight pattern. Why not use plexi glass so you can see what's going on?

The brush can be lower than the bit to get a better seal. If you use plexiglas, you'd have to hold it up too high to be effective to prevent it from crashing into your workpiece.

It's easy to make a brushed collector like the Shopbot's for flat panel work, but for effective dust collection on 3D work, it gets a lot harder.

Graham S
08-29-2004, 07:00 PM
err, I think he means plexiglass instead of MDF rather than instead of the brushes. i.e. for the frame.

DSL PWR
08-29-2004, 07:01 PM
You bet

ger21
08-29-2004, 08:01 PM
That went right over my head. :)

sol
08-29-2004, 09:15 PM
Free advice dept....Do not make the mistake I made of enclosing the base of the router with the vacuum cowl; the router's exhaust overpowers the vac and blows dust everywhere; it was a powerful vac too...
This thread's previous image looks promising with only the bit enclosed.

Also the brush on some vacuum cleaner's sweeper attachment is essentially a flexible metal channel with bristles mounted into it. The channel-bristle assembly is sometimes removable (I've had them fall out while I was vacuuming) and would be great for a custom brush. Probably get the attachment for cheap from a vac repair shop.

tpworks
08-30-2004, 02:20 AM
Free advice dept....Do not make the mistake I made of enclosing the base of the router with the vacuum cowl; the router's exhaust overpowers the vac and blows dust everywhere; it was a powerful vac too...
This thread's previous image looks promising with only the bit enclosed.

Also the brush on some vacuum cleaner's sweeper attachment is essentially a flexible metal channel with bristles mounted into it. The channel-bristle assembly is sometimes removable (I've had them fall out while I was vacuuming) and would be great for a custom brush. Probably get the attachment for cheap from a vac repair shop.

Unless you plan ahead and divert the routers air flow, this one works pretty well for me.
Tom

Graham S
08-30-2004, 07:05 AM
Here is an idea (I think). Rather than have a brush curtain why not have an air curtain. The basic idea is to have a dont shaped mainfold into which a set of nozzles fit, either that or one long nozzle. You pass compressed air through the nozzles (perhaps not at full pressure), the air hits the machining surface and tends to push chips towards the centre. The awaiting vacuum then picks them up. With adjustment it should be possible to get a high velocity air loop going from nozzle to vacuum.

I just thought this might be a nice way to do it for 3D stuff, it is works that is.

Graham

ynneb
08-30-2004, 07:20 AM
Hey these are some really good responces.
Maybe its not such and unexciting project.

I might do a composite creation uncluding a plexiglass cover with an air curtain.

These ideas are more exciting than what I was planing to do.

Graham S
08-30-2004, 10:29 AM
Just to take the cool factor to 10 why not get a cheapo laptop webcam. They are small and very cheap these days. Install in your head to watch the action. I do something a little like this, I have a small RF camera that I set up to watch my mill. It runs in the attic while I keep an eye on it via the TV card on my PC. Keeps me away from the noise and I can surf the web etc.

As far as dust on the lens, there are two solutions I can think of. A perspex cover and windscreen wiper or much cooler a mylar conveyer belt type lens cover that contiuously moves through wipers to keep it dust free.

You can probably take these things too far but what the hell.

Graham

ynneb
08-30-2004, 06:52 PM
You can probably take these things too far but what the hell.

Nah never, putting down ideas in text is fun and real easy. We will probably do a tenth of the ideas, but I love exploring new concepts.

Keep the ideas coming in.

EDIT: I wonder if this qualifies as "Open source brainstorming" ? That section is looking quite lonely.

sol
12-25-2004, 09:48 PM
This is the result of much trial and error.

A unit that only used air jets and vacuum required too much pressure and vac to overcome the chip throw of the bit. A physical barrier was needed to stop the heavier chips...brush bristles worked. :rolleyes:
The vac's suction needed to be as close to the bit as possible to take advantage of, rather than fight, the router's exhaust, and to keep the footprint of the unit from being clunky.
With this set-up the exhaust actually helps to drive dust up the vac port, therefore the vacuum motor can be slowed way down to a purr rather than its normal scream.
Parts are off the shelf 2" and 1-½ " DWV plumbing fittings and 1-½ " vac hose with attachments.
The hose swivels from the ceiling....
The assembly is easily removed from the router by loosening one wing-screw, and the brush snaps off so the cutter/bit is visible for job set-up.

Works well so far....

Macaba
12-26-2004, 07:12 AM
As regards to the post earilier about keeping dust off camera lenses, there is a very effective method which is used to keep water off lenses, and it may work equally well with dust.
Its a spinning perspex disc which is placed in front of the lense in a sealed unit. When particles (water and maybe dust) attempt to land on it, it gets instantly flung off.
Rather clever idea.

sol
05-23-2005, 09:34 PM
Re: post 14
Okay, more trial and error.
Just an update on a new vac offset, works better, looks nicer.
Show and tell here
http://solsylva.com/cnc/9bcnc54.html

ViperTX
05-23-2005, 10:20 PM
The problem with any item...especially plastic rotating in the air charges the surface and dust is attracted to it....large particles are flung off, but the dust builds up.

ynneb
05-23-2005, 10:48 PM
Sol, I take my hat off to you in.
You went to much effort to make that design.
Even thought it is a simple idea, I can see you have put a lot of thought into it.
I had forgotten about this thread, thanks for reviving it, I think I might change the title of it to reflect more about what it is.

trilect
05-24-2005, 11:41 AM
The problem with any item...especially plastic rotating in the air charges the surface and dust is attracted to it....large particles are flung off, but the dust builds up.


This might be a silly idea but why couldn't a person make a positive or negative ion charger to charge air and blow over the static problem surface to cancel out the static charge?

tauscnc
05-25-2005, 10:54 AM
Hey Sol,

I just started looking into dust collecting systems and am really impressed by the moulded tube. Great job on the fiberglassing!

taus

Dave's_Not_Here
05-25-2005, 01:10 PM
... track. Smaller diameter creates greater velocity to overcome the vortex created from the router. Compare the velocity of a 4" dust collector opening to a 1.5" home vacuum cleaner opening and you will get the picture.

you can still create a plexiglass housing with the bristles along the edges and use 4" tubing from your main collector but reduce the diameter to about 1.5" at the housing (near the bit) and you will achieve great visability of your actual cut along with sweeping action and surface contour compensation.

Locate the vacuum attachment to the direction that the chips fly from the cut and it will also increase your collection efficiency since the chips will fly toward the vacuum rather than away... which seriously reduces the force that has to be overcome since you are not changing the direction of the propelled chips but rather increasing their evacuation velocity.

Love to see what you have designed... great thread... (group)

ger21
05-25-2005, 02:30 PM
Unless all your cuts are in the same direction, it's impossible to orient the vacuum in the direction the chips fly.

Imo, you'd be better off with a larger housing with a longer brush. THis gives you a better seal against the work, and the bigger housing will keep the brush out of the bit.

Our router at work has a dedicated 10HP, 4000CFM dust collector, and if I use longer tools so the brushes aren't down against the workpiece, I've seen a 3ft roostertail of chips flying out. And this is with a 4" hose that sucks a lot harder than a good shop vac. The key is getting a good seal to the workpiece.