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Patrick2by4
06-17-2004, 12:47 AM
Well, after lurking around for 4 months, it's time to take the plunge. I learned alot from reading Jeff's threads (HomeCNC), Eric (Balsaman) and many other other of you guys. I have to say that I am very impressed by this site and I'm trying to get some of my friends into this. One is already interested.

My machine is going to be made from both steel and plate aluminum (6061-t651). It will have a work area of approximately 30" x 65" and about 6" of height. I'm hoping to achieve about 120 ~180 ipm with my servos

One interesting feature which I plan to incorporate in the gantry is the ability to raise the height about 5 inchs if I ever want to do 10" columns on the 4th axis. It should take me about 20 minutes to raise the main beam with the ball screw.

Here is a quick sketch of the machine I'm planning to make

Patrick2by4
06-17-2004, 12:56 AM
here is another view of the machine Hopefully, everything should work out :)

Patrick2by4
06-17-2004, 01:01 AM
here are the parts for the gantry

Patrick2by4
06-17-2004, 01:10 AM
I started cutting down the alum plating with a 80 tooth carbide blade. The triple chip grind on the blade did a beautiful job on the edges. Not much work will be needed to finish the edges. :banana:

The plating is 5/8 thick

Patrick2by4
06-17-2004, 01:40 AM
Here is the main beam of the gantry, it's 3" x 5" Alum rectangular stock with 1/8" walls. I was planning to mount it to the gantry with alum blocks. The mitre saw did a nice job squaring up the stock. :cool:

ynneb
06-17-2004, 08:30 AM
Good posting Pat. Keep this thread up to date with all your work. If you dont get lots of comments, be assured there will be many readers and people who will follow you.
I will be keeping an eye out on your progress. Make sure you ask lots of silly questions along the way. Its the silly questions that people are afraid to ask that hold them back.

Good job mate.

trubleshtr
06-17-2004, 05:28 PM
Looking good.
You used a "special blade" specificlly for cutting all that aluminum on your saws right?????
I would hate to see someone use a woodworking blade on aluminum stock.....ouch!!!!!!!!!!

Ken_Shea
06-17-2004, 05:34 PM
You used a "special blade" specificlly for cutting all that aluminum on your saws right?????
I would hate to see someone use a woodworking blade on aluminum stock.....ouch!!!!!!!!!!

I was thinking the same thing trubleshtr, but sometimes a man has to do what he has to do :D


Looking real good patrick2by.

jimbo
06-17-2004, 06:51 PM
He said he used a triple chip grind blade which is a tooth profile for cutting aluminum (and laminates). I have used it and it cuts aluminum like butter.

Ken_Shea
06-17-2004, 08:42 PM
Post deleted after re-reading jimbo's post.

Patrick2by4
06-18-2004, 12:18 AM
That right jimbo, a regular bevel tooth carbide blade would get nicked and give a ragged cut in aluminum but a triple chip grind carbide blade is designed for harder materials. I use it all the time on my job (finish carpenter) for cutting plastic, corian, aluminum (but not steel), formica... it works beautifully.

I just got the delivery of my metric cap screws today. I hope to start assembling the gantry next week; I'm not looking forward to all that drilling and tapping. :( I plan to use a cordless drill with a clutch to speed things up.

I picked up the metric taps at www.e-taps.com
the metric socket head cap screws at www.fastener-express.com

ynneb
06-18-2004, 06:24 AM
Hey Pat, I notice on your machine you are spending a bit more money than mvaughan, who is doing a new router at the same time as you. It would be great to compile two open source projects. Would you also be prepared to make your work open source. It would mean you just did the same posts as you are already doing, but wrote a bit about each and every step you took. I would do the final compiling of the project, but you would get all the credits.
We need a few projects, so we can offer machines plans to cater for different building budgets.

All the plans would be made free to download. No one would be profiting from your work.

How does that sound? Just think, you would be known around the world. :)

berin
06-18-2004, 09:52 AM
I have a quetsion? how are those slider rails? do they have any play in them or are they just as tight as can be? I've been thinking of getting one of those for my Z axis? What is really getting me is I'm debaiting how to setup my final machine when I get to that. But that will have 6 axis's.
:) tonight I'm going to start my documentary of where I have gotten so far. not to mention I finaly fixed one of my tools. So i can finaly finish the X axis on my machine.

Patrick2by4
06-18-2004, 02:46 PM
Hey Benny, it would be fine with me if you want to make it a open source project. I'll try to give a little more detail of all the steps I take as well as detailed drawings and plenty of pictures as I'm able to submit them. I also will credit different individuals who shared information on this forum.

jimbo
06-18-2004, 03:23 PM
To Benny, how about you "open-source" your router project. I only saw a few pictures and very little detail. I would be interested in the large cnc design.

patrick, nice parts. I was glancing at your drawing. I have a couple of suggestions before you get too far along and waste any materials.
1) It looks like you have a small plate that attaches the gantry to the trucks on the x axis, TO me that does not look very strong, you are relying on the strength of the material and bolts. I would suggest redesigning this area or add some gusseting. (maybe you intended this already) 2) Other people have mentioned that their gantries can/do flex. This is because it is a parallelogram, which is not stable. Add gussets at corners or otherwise add some triangulation. 3) How is the table supported? I would suggest adding supports in the center. You'd be surprised how much even 1/2" alum plate will flex only being supported in the ends. Just my opinion.

Maybe carry out the drawing a little further. Good luck. What kinds of things do you plan to cut with it?

Patrick2by4
06-21-2004, 12:00 AM
"I have a question? how are those slider rails? do they have any play in them or are they just as tight as can be?"

hey berin, sorry for not answering your questions sooner, I was away for the weekend. The linear slides are very stable with no discernable play. I noticed that there are also seals around the joint where the blocks meet with the rail to prevent dust infiltration. I am not sure if this is true of all linear slide blocks but it is true of the models I am using (part # 1632-114-10 Star tech for the y axis; part # LAS15ALZ NSK for the x axis)

Patrick2by4
06-21-2004, 12:27 AM
patrick, nice parts. I was glancing at your drawing. I have a couple of suggestions before you get too far along and waste any materials.
1) It looks like you have a small plate that attaches the gantry to the trucks on the x axis, TO me that does not look very strong, you are relying on the strength of the material and bolts.

It's true, I do intend to rest the gantry on 3/4" plates that will be bolted with about 4 bolt on each end of the gantry. Although the simple sketches didn't show it, there will also be a 1/4 alum plate connecting the bottom on the gantry legs together. (this will also connect to the ball screw via the nut located at the bottom between the linear slides) The top beam of the gantry will be securely bolted in as well which should eliminate any flexing or racking of the gantry. I considered putting in some trianglar brackets to strengthen the joint but decided to hold off on it for now. It would be simple to add it in later if I see the need.


How is the table supported? I would suggest adding supports in the center. You'd be surprised how much even 1/2" alum plate will flex only being supported in the ends.

The table will be supported by a 2" square tubular steel platform It will run the length of the table with plates supporting the end.

I will have more details in the drawings later (I'm still getting familar with AutoCad, sorry for the delay)

Patrick2by4
06-21-2004, 06:10 PM
Well, I started drilling the holes in the gantry header for the linear slides. I plan to mount the rails on top and bottom instead of the front face of the gantry header. The reason I decided to do this is because the header is only 5 inches high and I feel the the sleeve that surrounds the main header will be more stable this way. (it also solves the problem of where to put the ball screw) :idea:

Patrick2by4
06-21-2004, 06:17 PM
Well, I also tapped the holes for the linears rails in the main header of the gantry, 32 holes. All in all it went pretty smooth. I used a starter tap to make the intial threads in all the holes and then used a bottoming tap to tread the holes to its final dimension. A cordless drill with a clutch as well as a little oil sped things up quite a bit.

Patrick2by4
06-24-2004, 12:16 AM
Well, I tapped the end caps today. (These will be screwed to the gantry sides and then the gantry main header will be screwed to them. I should have it done by Friday. :)

Patrick2by4
06-24-2004, 12:18 AM
another picture

Patrick2by4
07-01-2004, 06:33 PM
Well, I had a opportunity to work a little on my machine today. I drilled the screw holes on the gantry side plates and attached the end caps. Here is a picture with the main box beam connected (excuse my carpenter lingo). Tommorrow I'll attach the bottom plates which the linear slide trucks will attach to.

arvidb
07-02-2004, 10:15 AM
How do you fasten the end caps to the beam? Screws from the sides (cannot see any in the picture tho)?

Arvid

ger21
07-02-2004, 11:18 AM
You can't see the six screws on the left plate in the picture?

Patrick2by4
07-02-2004, 07:17 PM
How do you fasten the end caps to the beam? Screws from the sides (cannot see any in the picture tho)?

Arvid

Well Arvid, the end caps are screwed to the side plates of the gantry (you can see the screws as Gerry mentioned). The box beam though hasn't been attached to the end caps yet because I still need to make adjustments to the final length of the beam. (the ball screw will determine the final length of the beam). I plan to use about 6 screws sideways to fasten the beam.

Here is a enlargement of the area in question

Patrick2by4
07-02-2004, 07:28 PM
Well, I worked on the side panel today and drilled out the holes on the end. I'm using 4 screws to hold the bottom plate to the gantry side panels. I screwed a piece of ply to my drill press to hold the side panels steady (I couldn't flip the table because I didn't have the right socket wrench...improvise, improvise, improvise)

Patrick2by4
07-02-2004, 07:36 PM
Here is a picture with the sides assembled. I put the square steel tubing underneath the gantry to see how it will look. Next week, I plan to secure the rails and start making the moving router carriage. (I have a long holiday weekend which I will use for other endeavors...sleeping and eating)

By the way, Spiderman 2 was awesome.

arvidb
07-03-2004, 06:55 AM
Originally posted by ger21
You can't see the six screws on the left plate in the picture?

*LOL* I can see the screws fastening the end caps to the side plates, but no screws that fastens the end caps to the beam. Not so strange since there weren't any! :)

Arvid

ger21
07-03-2004, 07:36 AM
I think there is some type of communication issue going on here. :D

Patrick2by4
07-07-2004, 06:18 PM
Well my parallel breaker board came in today, I'm still waiting for the other components to arrive in the mail. I'm excited at this point.... http://www.g4-hosting.net/~force198/ikonboard/emoticons/jump.gif

marvinstov
07-07-2004, 10:48 PM
Patrick,
Cool! What are the specs on your motors?

Marv

Patrick2by4
07-07-2004, 11:26 PM
Here are the specs:
Liton Clifton Precision Model # jdh 2250-bx-1c
360 oz/in peak torque.
36 VDC nominal supply
20 amps peak
18 oz/in per amp supplied.
2700 No load rpm at this voltage
5" long
2.25" dia.
1/4" shaft
You can see and purchase these motors at the lower link, they are $10 apiece http://www.g4-hosting.net/~force198/ikonboard/emoticons/eyebrow.gif great price huh!
http://www.automec-direct.netfirms.com/html/motor_details.html

Jeff from HomeCNC had a thread on these motors. Here is the link
http://www.cnczone.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=2360&highlight=clifton
He sells them complete with the encoder attached.

I can't wait to get mine spinning http://www.g4-hosting.net/~force198/ikonboard/emoticons/boomerang.gif

marvinstov
07-08-2004, 12:20 AM
Patrick,
Great, thanks. Sounds like you will have a really nice machine when you finish.

Marv

thekrenim
07-08-2004, 06:22 PM
Patrick:

What are those other components? The black ones look a little like bridge rectifiers.

starCNC
07-09-2004, 12:01 AM
Are u going to use the encoder from USdigital?

Patrick2by4
07-09-2004, 01:38 AM
Hey Isaac (thekrenim http://www.g4-hosting.net/~force198/ikonboard/emoticons/alien8.gif) those black boxes you see are the motor drivers. The actual part is called Geckodrive G320 DC Servodrive. Each one controls one motor axis via your computer parallel port.
You can purchase them direct from their website...
http://www.geckodrive.com/
The guy who designed and sells them is named Mariss Freimani, a real good guy who stands behind his products and offers all sorts of excellent advice. He usually hangs out at the electronics section of this website.
Here is another picture of them, and check out the cool keychain that came with them.

Patrick2by4
07-09-2004, 01:50 AM
Hey StarCNC, yes, I was planning to order the encoders this week. My Transformer will be here in two weeks, so everything will start cooking in about two weeks (hopefully only figuratively :eek: )

Patrick2by4
07-09-2004, 07:33 PM
Well, I had some time to work on the z-axis. I cut out the pieces on the table saw filed the edges and test fitted them in place.

Note: I'm using a sliding crosscut carriage on my tablesaw to square up the plates and cut multiple pieces exactly to size. It is a common jig many cabinet makers use to cut small pieces of lumber on the tablesaw.

Everything is moving along.....

Patrick2by4
07-09-2004, 07:35 PM
another picture with it put together... not screwed together yet ;)

IJ.
07-09-2004, 07:47 PM
Looking good Patrick :)!

Keep the pics coming.

ynneb
07-10-2004, 03:05 AM
After looking at your your gecko pictures Pat, I have come to the conclusion that
it would be great if Rutex and Gecko took some tips from each other.

If gecko had the running specs of Rutex, and Rutex had the nicely packaged look of Gecko.

Its tempting for me to make and sell my own drivers with the best of both and cheaper than both.

Ken_Shea
07-10-2004, 10:09 AM
You can see and purchase these motors at the lower link, they are $10 apiece great price huh!

Looks like the CNCzone gave them too much positive press, they are now $17.95 .:D

Still a bargin though

Patrick2by4
07-10-2004, 12:01 PM
Hey Ken, I just looked at their site and the motors are still $10. Maybe we are looking at differents sites? :confused: here is the text from their webpage, I copied it a minute ago....


The original price of these heavy-duty precision DC motors was $90. We are currently offering these motors to our customers for the incredibly low price of $9.95 plus shipping and handling.

We would like to emphasize that these are NEW (never been used) motors. Order now while supply lasts!

The shipping and handling charge is $4.50 for 1 motor and an additional charge of $2.00 per motor thereafter.

We ship via UPS ground to locations within the continental U.S. For orders outside the continental U.S. please email us at: sales@automec.com

http://www.automec-direct.netfirms.com/html/clifton_dc_motor.html

Patrick2by4
07-10-2004, 12:25 PM
I have a updated drawing of my machine in AutoCad (I'm getting a little more proficient in it now) I still haven't drawn it out completely but I'll draw up a complete set once I finish my machine.

There is a little more detail in this drawing

Patrick2by4
07-10-2004, 12:39 PM
Hey benny, I keep hearing about rutex... how good are the rutex drivers?

marvinstov
07-10-2004, 12:56 PM
Hi Patrick,
I thought they were still $10.00 too. Click on the order button and the prices says &17.95.

I have two of these motors (double shaft). Anyone know where I can get encoders for them?

Marv

metlmunchr
07-10-2004, 01:37 PM
If you go to their site and then refresh the page you'll probably see the $17.95 price. Thats what I saw today when I went there for the first time. Your browser is probably pulling up the page from stored pages. A while back I somehow got mine set to never check for new pages, and anything I returned to always stayed the same, even if it had been a couple days since I was last there.

Patrick2by4
07-10-2004, 02:28 PM
you're right, I refreshed my browser and it showed the new price http://www.g4-hosting.net/~force198/ikonboard/emoticons/embarrassed.gif

Annnyway... Marv, you can get the encoders at www.usdigital.com.
Look for the E2-250-250-E (the E option is the encoder with the extended cap which will cover the entire mechanism).

(update 8/8/04 - After getting the encoders, I realized it was going to be more differcult mounting the E option over the G option. Although I can get the e option to work well with the addition of fender washers, it is less work to just get the g option part #E2-250-250-G)

For a futher discussion of encoders I recommend you read the following two threads before you buy anything... very informative
http://www.cnczone.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=3898&highlight=usdigital discusses resolution count
and
http://www.cnczone.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=2360&highlight=usdigital discusses which encoder to get for the clifton motors

Note: you also may want to get shielded wire with your encoders because I hear that motor electrical noise may interfere with the encoder signals.

I hope this is helpful

:cheers:

marvinstov
07-10-2004, 02:36 PM
Ok thanks Patrick.

ynneb
07-11-2004, 12:21 AM
Hey Benny, I keep hearing about rutex... how good are the rutex drivers?


Pat I wrote a review here.
http://www.cnczone.com/modules.php?s=&name=Sections&sop=viewarticle&artid=15

I am not bagging your choice. I have never had an opportunity to use Geckos so I don't know first hand much about them.

The reason I did choose Rutex though, was because I had seen a few posts in the forum of how some had used Geckos and then decided to switch over to Rutex. I had not seen any posts doing the reverse. Rutex are slightly more expensive though, but they also have higher voltage and amperage specs too.

I am sure your Geckos will drive those Cliftons with ease.

Patrick2by4
07-12-2004, 10:34 PM
well, I ordered the encoders today as well as the capacitor and bridge rectifier. I'm approaching the point that is giving me the most trepidation, the electronics. :(

If not one hears from me in the next two weeks, it means I died of a heart attack... or maybe a exploding capacitor (those puppies are huge!!!)

Patrick2by4
07-14-2004, 11:37 PM
Well, I finished the first half of the z-axis today. I still need to pick up the short linear slides and lead screw to finish the other half of the z axis. I will drill out the holes for the slide blocks tommorrow and then mount it.

note: I plan to put alum blocks on the top half where the motor will go to prevent the z-axis carriage from racking and to give support to a top plate that will be added later (for the motor)

Patrick2by4
07-15-2004, 07:40 PM
I had a chance to install the linear slide blocks to the z-axis today. It slides smoothly and with no play. :)

At this point, I will start constructing the table to hold the x-axis. I will be using steel angle from all the bed frames I find. (dumpster diving time!) http://www.g4-hosting.net/~force198/ikonboard/emoticons/hammer.gif

Moondog
07-16-2004, 08:30 AM
Hello Patrick.

On one of your previous posts that shows the pic of your rails. Are your bearings and rails the Drylin T Linear System?...

Just curios.. how have you found them?..

Patrick2by4
07-16-2004, 05:25 PM
hello moondog,
the linear rails that I have are from two different manufacturers.
the x-axis rails are 72" long and are from NSK; the slide block is #LAS15. the y-axis rails are from star tech and are 37" long and the slide block is # 1632-114-10.

Neither one are from the Drylin T Linear System. I have noticed a slight resisitance in the star tech blocks because of a dust prevention shields pressing slightly against the rails. I think once the machine gets moving, the tension in the shields should loosen. But both slides move smoothly with no discernable play. I would purchase them again.

danialsan
07-21-2004, 01:17 PM
Your machine looks great so far :cheers: . Could you tell me where you managed to find 3x5 aluminum tube, all the suppliers in my area say they do not have a source for that size.

Thanks,
Dan

IJ.
07-21-2004, 06:40 PM
Patrick: Looking great! In the next pic you post could you include a common item (maybe a soft drink can) sitting on the cross beam for scale?

Patrick2by4
07-21-2004, 11:40 PM
Hey danialsan and IJ,

Thanks for the compliments, it helps to motivate me.http://www.g4-hosting.net/~force198/ikonboard/emoticons/happy2.gif

The Aluminum rectangular tube was a extra piece that was left behind after a general contractor finished installing a aluminum and glass entrance to a building.
There is a place online where you can purchase a piece as well as all the plating http://mymetalconnection.com/
Look under 'tube & pipes' (by the way, they sell aluminum plating through ebay for about $3 a pound; since I live so close to them, I buy all my stuff from them)

IJ, tommorrow I will put a ruler next to the gantry (I will also put a cola can for good measure)
Get a load of the capacitor in relation to that coke can.
See how big I am in relation to that coke can :D

Also, I got most of the electronics in the mail today, I look forward to this weekend.

starCNC
07-22-2004, 12:06 AM
very nice looks like you still missing some encoders or they are in one of those bags.
$$$What's the damage?$$$

satchid
07-22-2004, 04:50 AM
Patrick,
Your machine looks wonderful, also the clarity of your postings on this (your) tread is very understandable and clear. For the first time I rated a tread, and I rated the maximum. I also want to thank you for this.

I am designing also my first CNC machine. I design the machine in aluminum plates and make it in MDF from the same thickness, later when every problem is solved, I will replace the MDF with aluminum. I hope to be able to make some aluminum parts on the MDF machine.
Questions:
What is the effective cutting area of your machine?
What is the free cutting height?
What is the spindle that you will be using?
Are you using stepper motors or servo motors?


A request: You gave the permission to have this machine as open source. Therefore, could you make photos of your machine in such a way that the dimensions are as real as possible, and therefore scalable? You can do this by putting your lens as far as possible away from the machine in the center of the view that you want to make a photo of, zoom in so that it fits the screen. A piece of cardboard or a stick of say 1’0” X ¼” vertical close to the centre of the machine makes it easier to scale the different views,
Then I can make a rough drawing of the machine and modify it to my needs and sizes.

Satchid

IJ.
07-22-2004, 05:01 AM
Patrick: ROFLMAO either that's a small Coke can or you're a really big guy :)!

The support of the members here can be a huge help in finishing a machine, Even if it's just a "well done" from time to time!

I have the utmost respect for the guys such as yourself that build from scratch as it's an enormous undertaking to get from your initial concept to a finished functional CNC controlled machine!

danialsan
07-22-2004, 09:35 AM
Hi Patrick,
Thanks :) for the address for the aluminum tube, however I just called them and they will only sell it in 24 foot lengths.....that should leave me with 21 feet left over...... :mad:......anyone else need some rectangular aluminum tube?

Dan

Patrick2by4
07-22-2004, 10:38 PM
Hello starCNC, Satchid, IJ

'very nice looks like you still missing some encoders or they are in one of those bags. $$$What's the damage?$$$'
Thanks for the compliment, and yes the encoders are in the plastic bag at the bottom right. As for the cost, I'll itemize everything when I finish but so far I spent about $2000 or close to it. http://www.g4-hosting.net/~force198/ikonboard/emoticons/crying3.gif

What is the effective cutting area of your machine?
What is the free cutting height?

The effective cutting area should be about 32"wide x 65"long x 5"/10"high (the height will be adjustable; I'm designing the beam that supports the y axis the ability to be bolted higher when I need the extra height)

What is the spindle that you will be using?

I'm not sure yet, but it will be a 3hp router with speed adjustment.

Are you using stepper motors or servo motors?

I am using servo motors/encoders/gear pulleys w/belt http://www.g4-hosting.net/~force198/ikonboard/emoticons/agree2.gif

You gave the permission to have this machine as open source. Therefore, could you make photos of your machine in such a way that the dimensions are as real as possible, and therefore scalable?

I'll do better, when I am finished, I'll post the CAD drawings (copy away and improve on it; share the improvements with me :D )

"Patrick: ROFLMAO either that's a small Coke can or you're a really big guy !"

Why..... I'm HUGH! :D
Anyway, here are the pictures you requested (I didn't have a coke can handy)

IJ.
07-22-2004, 10:50 PM
You're "HUGH"?? I thought you were "Patrick" ;)!

Ohhh you mean "HUGE"!!

Thanks Patrick you're a class act and I'm sure the Cad files will be in demand once you're done.

Patrick2by4
07-22-2004, 11:00 PM
I had the chance to work on the table today. I used old bed frames that I found in the street, ground off the rivets and cut them down to the sizes I needed. I made up a template on my work table (one that I will be replacing shortly) with cleats and just popped in the steel angle and welded up the table frame. Here are the pictures.

Note: yes there are little burn marks on the table but I was going to replace it anyway... and I had water handy as well... well at least soda.
:rolleyes:

By the way, the table is very rigid. I'm going to put side panels and a plywood bottom to give it some weight. Later on, I might add wheels.

Patrick2by4
07-23-2004, 05:01 PM
Well, I finished painting the table last night, it is amazing how nice the table looks with a coat of paint. I also stuck the gantry on this morning to see how it looks. :D

Well now I'm concentrate on the electronics and see if I can get the motors spinning.

IJ.
07-23-2004, 06:47 PM
I'm so impressed by what you guys achieve with minimal resources!

Can't wait for the "first cut".

Is it just me or does the Gantry look like one the the things from the movie "Tron" (I know this dates me but anyone that's seen it will know what I'm on about :) )

http://members.optushome.com.au/jg11_ij/tron_large_15t.jpg (http://members.optushome.com.au/jg11_ij/tron_large_15.jpeg)

Patrick2by4
07-23-2004, 11:05 PM
okay, I confess, that's where I got my design http://www.g4-hosting.net/~force198/ikonboard/emoticons/crying1.gif

By the way IJ, your knee mill retrofit came came out well. http://www.cnczone.com/forums/showthread.php?t=4327&page=1&pp=10
I was thinking about getting a mini-combo lathe/mill. I took machine shop when I was back in high school and I always found it interesting. I'm intrigued with the idea of making my own tools and fittings (plus CNCing it). I guess that will be a future project.

Patrick2by4
08-28-2004, 02:44 AM
Well, sorry for the delay, but I had a car 'accident' and my car was out of commission for a few weeks. Nobody hurt but the car did need some work. (Couldn't drive to the hardware store to get parts)

Anyway, I'm starting to install the bearings for the ball screw in this picture. I used a 1 1/4 spade bit that I ground down slightly on the sides to fit the metric annular contact bearing. The bearing fit in the hole well. Next week I will mount the bearing complete for the Y axis. http://smilies.cw08.calibra-web.de/html/images/smilies/essen/essen23.gif

(Note: I predrilled 3/16" holes first, the spade bit self centered the material and then I clamped the alum down and drilled to the desired depth, oiling every 10 seconds)

Here are some pictures

Txfatboy
08-28-2004, 04:47 PM
Very good work I have gathered alot of very useful info from your post. I would like to know why you went with servo's instead of steppers? Again great job and good luck .

dmgdesigns
08-29-2004, 07:35 AM
Patrick

First GREAT job with the machine! You have a really nice shop, it really looks great.

I am amazed that the spade bit worked for the bearing surface. Will there be a set scrrew holding the bearing?

What type of saw blade did you use in your table and miter saw to cut the aluminum? I am to the point that it is time to start construction of an aluminum machine as well.

chronon1
08-29-2004, 10:57 PM
I think... ? This a great thread from someone who has the resources, desire ambition and motivation to plunge into it ! :banana:

I have been trying to start (small scale) .. just getting a couple of printer drive electronics and hardware going but it is daunting - I took an old HP SCSI scanner and stripped it down.. it has a bipolar stepper and some nice 24" round shiny rails --- figuring out driving the controller chip is my current stick point - unipolar is relatively easy -- just pulse each of the 4 coils and ground the 2 commons ... (generally) -- but this H bridge and reversing polarity makes for more complex signal generation. Perhaps the chip only needs step and direction because it has it's own H bridge within it. (wedge)

Unlike many others, who build the mechanicals first, I am concentrating on the motors and control circuitry because I find that the most difficult -- and the mechanicals is more fun and less brain work.

I did try and make a manual router gantry system.. where u just slide it by hand ... but you really need a bearing ( ball preferably) ... .. those Home Depot drawer slides are a viable solution ..

Thanks for taking your time and utilizing your digital camera / file efforts for the documentation of your project, Pat --- this i a large scale machine ( for most hobbyists) .. and I think this is a goal sized machine for many people who think smaller scale for their beginings ... ( sorry you lost a month due to car accident"") .. down here in the orlando area .. the traffic is so bad ,, if you dont have an automatic.. you have a very very high chance of rear ending or being rear ended.....

Onward ! !!! :cheers:

Patrick2by4
08-30-2004, 06:29 AM
I would like to know why you went with servo's instead of steppers? Again great job and good luck

Thanks Txfatboy, from the various threads posted on the site, I realized that servo's suited my needs better (higher rpms, more powerful among other things) and as a big plus, I got my motors dirt cheap.

I am amazed that the spade bit worked for the bearing surface. Will there be a set scrrew holding the bearing?
What type of saw blade did you use in your table and miter saw to cut the aluminum? I am to the point that it is time to start construction of an aluminum machine as well.

Well mark, I also was surprised the spade bit cut alum so well. When I first did it, I was getting these wonderful strips of continueous aluminum ribbons.I plan to use a set screw to hold the outer raceway of the bearing in place. As for the saw blade, I used a triple chip 80 tooth blade in both my tablesaw and mitersaw to cut the aluminum. These type of blades cut aluminum (as well as plastic) very well. Gerry mentioned in a pervious thread that a negative rake angle on the carbide tooth cuts a little bit better. I do know that it helps particularly on a mitresaw.


Hey chronon1, It really is alot of fun building a cnc machine and quite a learning experience. I also think this is a good sized machine for a hobbiest, you can cut a wide range of things and still have a manageable footprint.
I plan to continue posting plenty of pictures and also detailed information as to my thinking on several parts. Thanks for reading my posts.
:cheers: :cool:

Txfatboy
09-02-2004, 03:20 PM
Were did you find your motors and what type of drivers are you using.

Graham S
09-02-2004, 03:46 PM
Read the first page of the thread

ynneb
11-09-2004, 01:26 AM
Hey Pat, its been a while since your last post. Hows things going.
Have you hit a hurdle ?
Youve been doing so well so far.

Mr.Chips
12-17-2004, 09:37 AM
Hello Pat,
I see a fellow wood worker has been bitten by the CNC bug. It's a lot of fun and metal construction is more of a challange than wood at least for me.

Really like your design, the extruded alum box on your Y axis will be super strong. And you will be able to expand your woodworking skills with a CNC machine.

Keep us up to date on your progress.

Hager

Patrick2by4
12-18-2004, 06:11 PM
Hello folks, sorry I didn't communicate for awhile (a series of events happened with family, friends and my employment which sort of took priority for a while). I'm hoping to get back to building my machine sometime in January. I especially look forward to catching up to all the posting and progress that many others have made with their machines.
Enjoy your holidays and new year.
Pat

mvaughn
01-28-2005, 02:03 PM
Hi Patrick,

Hopefully everything is going well with you and yours... When you decide to come back and start working on your CNC router, we'll be here for you.

onthemarc
01-29-2005, 03:28 AM
Hi Patrick
I looked at the Automec web sight. The motor specks say 46.5 in/oz @ 3 amps
can you really pump 20 amps through that motor and get 360 in/oz of torque from that motor? And 3 motors at 20 amps plus your spindle motor seems like a lot of amps
for that machine. Or am I not figuring this right?

Wm McNett
09-30-2006, 10:13 PM
I feel sore, I just bought 3 of them JDH-2250-BX-1C Clifton Precision servo motors for $100 + shipping with/out encoders.

F3RR3T
09-12-2008, 12:00 AM
sorry to bring this up from the dead. why bolts instead of welding?