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DanielV
11-08-2007, 11:04 PM
Has anybody used the packages from Dave at HobbyCNC?

I am wondering how much soldering will have to be done.Also
how would you guys rate the products from him?

This the package that I am looking at.

FoamPROPKG Package
With (4) 84oz-in Dual Shaft Steppers
$215USD + $16USD

I am just like most of you guys and I just plan on producing
parts for my planes.

Any help would be greatly appreciated,
Daniel

OzarkCNC
11-09-2007, 09:35 PM
I bought the 4AUPC board with 4 305oz/in motors and the HCNCPRO board. Both took roughly 6-7 hours of soldering to complete.

I was taking my time. Someone posted they had theirs done in 90 minutes. Hmm I dunno.

If you aren't comfortable with soldering, then this may not be for you. If you feel at home with a soldering iron, then go for it.

Dave provides top notch support. You can also get support from others in his Yahoo group once you have made your purchase.

The only thing I can say is that I was too conservative at soldering my first board. You have to make certain the solder flows to BOTH sides. My second board went together easier. I reversed a few capacitors, but fixed them before applying power.

Always double/triple check the directions before applying heat. It is so much easier to flip a component that isn't soldered in place.

Good luck!

vulcom1
11-10-2007, 05:08 PM
I have also built the Hobbycnc pro board which is very close t the same as what you are looking at. I use mine for foamcutting also but my intent was to also hook up my mill/drill. For the cost I will buy another board from Dave and do it separately. Not worth the hassle of disconnecting and changing over.
As for building, the above instructions are good and I would reccomend you use a 25/30 watt iron with a small tip along with 1/16" or less solder. I also have a bench light/magnifyer for checking the joints which comes in handy for using to much solder and bridging a circuit.
If you buy a kit you can go on Dave's other site or you can ask for help here. Happy to help.
John

DanielV
11-10-2007, 06:14 PM
Okay guys it looks like I will buy the package Dave has.

Thanks!

OzarkCNC
11-10-2007, 09:13 PM
As for building, the above instructions are good and I would reccomend you use a 25/30 watt iron with a small tip along with 1/16" or less solder. I also have a bench light/magnifyer for checking the joints which comes in handy for using to much solder and bridging a circuit.
If you buy a kit you can go on Dave's other site or you can ask for help here. Happy to help.
John

I took my board and scanned it on my flatbed scanner to check it when complete. IT is so much easier to inspect at 50x or 300x to really see if your soldering job is up to par.

http://ozarkmark.smugmug.com/gallery/3788115

vulcom1
11-12-2007, 12:50 PM
Daves boards are through hole from what I have seen and what I do to check is turn them component side up and check the legs of the parts. The solder should fill the hole and the legs should be surrounded by clean looking shiny solder. If not reheat the joint. They are a very easy board to check.
John

Micro Rotors
11-20-2007, 08:42 PM
Dave's boards and Dave himself are top notch. The customer service is like no other. My board went together in two nights, about 2 hours each night. I hooked up the main power about 2 weeks later for the first time and hooked it to the wrong part.


KAPLOWWEEE

Totally my fault! Dave gave me a nice discount on a replacement board. It runs perfectly.

I don't think Dave's boards have one flaw. It has been well proven over and over again!

Bill

m1911bldr
12-26-2007, 08:44 AM
If you're new to soldering, a little tip to save you MUCH frustration - keep the tip CLEAN! Use a damp (not wet by any means) heavy paper towel or sponge to wipe the tip BEFORE SOLDERING EACH JOINT, or at least every other one or so. Re-tin the tip whenever you put the iron down -keeps the "crud" from forming and makes soldering SO much easier. Cleaning the circuit board pads and the component leads will go a long ways in making things easier, too. I use Industrial Alcohol (get it from a paint supplier, don't use household alcohol) and an acid brush with the bristles cut back to about 3/16 inch. When you solder, be patient and put the solder on the pad and lead, NOT on the tip. A tiny bead of sloder on the tip will aid in heat transfer, but soldering is actually done on the pad and lead, not on the tip.

DanielV
12-27-2007, 12:50 AM
Thanks for the tip.
I see you are from Oklahoma City.
I live in MidWest City.I have not bought the components from Dave or hobbycnc for
this exact reason.
Would you be interested in making some money for doing the soldering?

m1911bldr
12-27-2007, 06:35 AM
Daniel,
I would be more than happy to help you learn how to solder - no money involved! My email address is: m1911bldr@cox.net. We can get together after the 1st of the year if you'd like. I have one of Dave's OLD (4ADBWOHC) boards that has been chugging happily for the past couple of years. Building a 3 1/2 x 4 ft foam cutter now. Also have a 3+ x 4+ ft router in the works.