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View Full Version : In 2018, Are Printed Objects Tough Enough to Use?



The New Steve H
06-24-2018, 07:17 PM
Last time I thought about getting into 3D printing, I was put off by the weak printed objects I saw. People in videos were bending them and causing them to peel into separate layers. I figured the technology wasn't up to making useful objects that were capable of standing up to real-world use.

Now I'm looking at the technology again. I'm seeing claims that seem to suggest you can actually use printed objects instead of relying on them for models and so on. Is this true?

I just saw that Monoprice makes a cheap printer that has a heated plate and prints at up to 260 Celsius. I was thinking I might try one out.

mikeyd895
06-25-2018, 12:47 AM
has its uses, you can change strength of parts many ways.
I had printed housings for a set of projector headlights probably around 3-4 years ago for my hummer
still there working

whitefox
06-25-2018, 07:10 AM
They are useable for certain applications. It really depends on what properties you need. If you can reason through the expected failure mode, you can often design the part and orient it in such a way that the chance of failure is reduced. It’s not much different than dealing with metals like (hcp) magnesium where material orientation matters.


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A_Camera
06-25-2018, 07:45 AM
I can make a video showing that a print is easy to bend and break, and I can make a video showing huge strength and unbeatable print. Depends on what I want to show... Anyway, print durability depends on you, the way you print and the materials you use.

MetalShavings
08-05-2018, 08:32 PM
I've had my 3D printer for about three months now and after figuring out how to use it and how to tweak the print settings for the stuff I was wanting to make I found that for my applications, the parts I'm printing seem to be more than strong enough. Most of the stuff I've made thus far is Air Gun and Firearms related.

I've made Adjustable Peep Sights, Extended magazines and stripper clips for one of my military surplus rifles. I'll be attempting to make an extended magazine for my Lee Enfield rifle next. I've tried making these items using ABS filament as well as Carbon-Fiber. The Carbon-Fiber printed out with excellent surface finishes compared to the ABS but the ABS seems to be a little more resilient in terms of strength and having a bit more elasticity. The Carbon-Fiber in it's printed form tended to be on the brittle side for my applications. I was afraid that it might tend to snap at or near the thinner sections of my prints under the recoil of my rifles.

Below are some pics of my the CAD renderings of some of the designs I came up with. You can see some of my other finished prints on my Instagram pages @umarex_tim.

MetalShavings

EssenceNash
09-19-2018, 02:17 AM
They are useable for certain applications. It really depends on what properties you need. If you can reason through the expected failure mode, you can often design the part and orient it in such a way that the chance of failure is reduced.

Nice! Thanks for the tip!