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thuffner3
03-13-2004, 07:46 PM
Hello Gang,
I picked this unit up from e-bay the other day

http://www.ferrus-power.co.uk/Custom_design/AC-DC_PRODUCTS/FS200/fs200.html

The seller claims the unit is 24v but I can't seem to get any more than 16.3 to 16.5v. Am I doing something wrong in testing?

Also I'd like to get a 12v leg out of this thing so I don't have to have an additional PSU in my Controller box.

Can I achieve this with what I have?

TIA.
Neil

Al_The_Man
03-14-2004, 11:40 PM
I suggest you email the Manuf. if you don't have the spec sheet on this unit, it looks like it has multiple outputs, do you have it connected for 110ac? According to the description it has remote sense, which on most supplies must have one of the output voltages strapped across to it for fullvoltage.
Al

pack rat
03-15-2004, 09:23 AM
This might be stupid suggestion, but the unit is 220V or 110V. Is the selector switch in auto mode? Should be set to 110V.

thuffner3
03-15-2004, 03:18 PM
No Pack,
It depends on how you make your terminal connection from your power source. There are two connector, one for 110v the other or 220v.

Neil

Al_The_Man
03-15-2004, 03:40 PM
Neil, Do you have any hook up sheet at all? as according to the specs it has an enable/inhibit terminal, and the second page looks like it shows terminal 1 as the inhibit?
Al

thuffner3
03-15-2004, 04:24 PM
No, I haven't had the chance to get in touch with the manufacturer yet.

thuffner3
03-15-2004, 04:40 PM
Is pin number one as indicated in the picture at the bottom of page two? If so I was thinking this was the line connection for 220v. with (N) being for nuetral??

Neil

Al_The_Man
03-15-2004, 04:58 PM
It looks like there is two terminal strips (upper/lower), I was refering to the top strip term. 1 , it's a job to make out but it looks like INIH. I wonder if this is an industrial ATX style PC power supply as this would have all the PC required power supplies including PS-ON which is pin 14 of a regular ATX supply and has to be connected to common to switch the supply on.
Al

thuffner3
03-15-2004, 06:04 PM
I'll dig up my camera and take a picture of what I have.

thuffner3
03-15-2004, 06:33 PM
It does look like the second set of terminals has INH as a number 1.

thuffner3
03-15-2004, 06:34 PM
another shot

thuffner3
03-15-2004, 07:22 PM
That's the best I can do with the camera. Can't seem to get the right lighting. But I can see that terminal #1 of strip #2 is INH. 4 & 5 of Strip #1 are for L N and gnd.

Al_The_Man
03-15-2004, 07:49 PM
Neil, It would appear that the INH is inhibit, but the question is what level should it be to enable, It quite possible that it might be connected to common (pin 7 of the upper strip). If you cannot get any info from the Manuf. then it would be trial an error. try common first or 5v level secondly to see if that works.
Al

thuffner3
03-15-2004, 09:09 PM
There was a panel connected across the connectors. I should be able to determine what pins where bridged to see what INH is connected to. As it is right now only having connecting the Line, Nuetral and Gnd. I get 16.5 v from any one of the Strip #2 side positive connectors.

Neil

thuffner3
03-15-2004, 10:41 PM
Hey Al,
I installed the panel that I mentioned above. Now I'm able to get a 24.2v reading across any of the local connections. 13 in all. Now I'm at square one, and needing to know how to get a 12v drop in one of the connectors. Can I use a halving circuit? I've seen serveral schematics. But don't rememberif they were capable of dropping from 24vdc to 12vdc.

Neil

Al_The_Man
03-16-2004, 12:29 AM
There's not many efficient ways of doing it if you need 12v at a fairly high current, if the current draw is in the Ma range then there is a couple of options.
Al

thuffner3
03-16-2004, 06:04 AM
My plan was to use it to run the controller board I have. it requires a minimuum of 10vdc.

Neil

Al_The_Man
03-16-2004, 09:53 AM
Neil, Whats the current draw at 12v?
Al

thuffner3
03-16-2004, 04:20 PM
http://eftech.home.comcast.net/prod3.htm

The above linked board is what I have. The instruction manual doesn't indicate a current draw for the board. It only states that it requires 10-16v dc. If you take a look at the unit over the web page you can see that there are two power relays for up(4amp) devices. What current is required by relays.

Al_The_Man
03-16-2004, 05:22 PM
Neil, I see that they also have a 24v version! I suspect you had already aquired that otherwise I guess you could have gone with 24vdc from the get-go. Anyway it looks to me like the 12v is for the circuit board logic and the relays, If you hook up a 12vdc (use a car battery if you have to) supply to the appropriate terminals (you don't need the 24v power) and if you have a multi-meter (or borrow one), measure the current. If you can measure the resistance of one of the relay coils that would help, otherwise a ball park figure could be used for printed circuit 12v relays.(or part number).
If you can come up with that, we can go from there.
Al

thuffner3
03-16-2004, 07:03 PM
Hey Al,
I do have a 12v atx PSU that I am currently using.
I was interested in the 24v unit because I've been reading that one should power their stepper motors with up to 3 to 4 times the required voltage per phase.
After thinking about since our last couple of posts. Perhaps people are using chopper style control boards.
My motor are 6vdc/1.2amp unipolar. So at 12v, I'm 2 times the voltage.

thuffner3
03-16-2004, 07:44 PM
Ok,
I was able to measure the current as the board is powered up and operating. The draw is 0.03amp's
@ 12vdc.

ger21
03-16-2004, 07:47 PM
I was interested in the 24v unit because I've been reading that one should power their stepper motors with up to 3 to 4 times the required voltage per phase

More like 10x to 20x is a LOT better. You should try for at least 5x. If your driver can't handle that, get some lower voltage motors.

Gerry

Al_The_Man
03-16-2004, 07:56 PM
Neil, I am not the guy to talk to regarding steppers I invested quite some time investigating them and became a bit disillutioned, but there are plenty here that can advise you, but if you still want to try the 24v to 12v route, at 30ma that current is not that much but that probabally does not include the two relay current draw.
I will post a couple of options that might work.
Al

thuffner3
03-16-2004, 08:12 PM
Originally posted by ger21
More like 10x to 20x is a LOT better. You should try for at least 5x. If your driver can't handle that, get some lower voltage motors.

Gerry

Thanks Al,
Later if I can get a minute or two, I'll check the draw for the board as the relays are powering devices.

thuffner3
03-16-2004, 09:19 PM
Hey Gerry,
If you have view the above mentioned board? Is it possible to set the current to something along the lines of 10 to 20x the voltage. The board is rated at 40 amp, for a total of 4 two phase motors running at 5amps per phase.

Neil

ger21
03-16-2004, 10:03 PM
It looks like the board has a limit of 30V for motor voltage, so I'd stay with the 24V. If you need more top speed, then I'd try to find some 2V-3V motors.

Gerry

Engineerman2
10-06-2011, 07:33 PM
Hi

The FS200/Z010 as manufactured by Ferrus Power for the Cincinnati Arrow and Milacron CNC's provides 5V +12 +12 -12.

Ferrus Power doesn't exist any more these days but you can get the unit refurbished to the original spec by the guys that used to Work at Ferrus Power. Called 'A1 Power Engineering (UK)' based in Peterborough in the UK.