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johnsguns1
02-16-2007, 06:17 PM
I have a small tig welder, I was wondering what would be the right Tungstun and rod for doing gunsmith work? TIA

mxtras
02-16-2007, 07:18 PM
Basically, use the tungsten with a red band and use a diameter that's about the same or slightly larger than your filler rod dimameter.

Scott

johnsguns1
02-16-2007, 09:54 PM
Thanks! What kind of rod should I look for?

tsutt
02-17-2007, 08:51 AM
there's newer tung. out there that has an orange band called ceriated. the red band is thoriated IE. thorium very unheathy. Todd

Weldtutor
02-17-2007, 09:49 AM
What kind of rod should I look for?

First identify the type of base metal you will be welding.

Your welding supplier can then provide a selection to choose from.

In some cases a general purpose filler rod is used for several different types of work pieces.

johnsguns1
02-17-2007, 10:42 AM
Thank You:rainfro:

woolstar
02-18-2007, 04:18 PM
For detail work, which is what I mostly do with my TIG welder, I go with a 1/16" electrode or sometimes even an .040", though that's a lot trickier to use. Go with a filler rod smaller than that if you can. Most of the time I'm just stealing solid wire out of my MIG welder because I'm not doing structural welds.

I have tungsten electrodes of all types (zr/ce/th/la), but most of the time just use the red (thoriated). It's dangerous the same way beryllium copper is dangerous: don't snort the grindings. If you get dust into your lungs there can be health effects, otherwise its pretty much inert. Of course I still solder with lead and used to play with mercury as a kid, so make up your own mind on how much exposure is fine for you.

Madclicker
02-18-2007, 11:43 PM
I have tungsten electrodes of all types (zr/ce/th/la), but most of the time just use the red (thoriated). It's dangerous the same way beryllium copper is dangerous: don't snort the grindings. If you get dust into your lungs there can be health effects, otherwise its pretty much inert. Of course I still solder with lead and used to play with mercury as a kid, so make up your own mind on how much exposure is fine for you.

That's funny. I've welded many miles of stainless pipe with red tungsten and still have and use lead solder. Just the other day I found a jar of mercury I rat-holed as a kid.

tsutt
02-19-2007, 06:17 AM
I was just letting them know there is a hazard. Maybe you should snort the grindings and drink the mercury. and tell us how you feel. Todd

johnsguns1
02-19-2007, 10:41 AM
Thanks for all the help guys. Lets play nice (flame2) (nuts) :)

drminpa
03-01-2007, 07:56 PM
Red band is Thoriated 2%. Thoria (thorium oxide) is a radioactive compound. The dust from grinding is very hazardous - read that as causes cancer. The alloy can be used for either dc electrode neg or ac welding so it's considered a general purpose electrode. 1% Thoria is yellow band and has similar applications to 2% but is not as stable at higher temperatures/currents.

Green band is pure tungsten - used for AC welding

Blue, gold and black bands are Lanthanated (Lanthanum oxide) 2%, 1.5% and 1% - These are a safer choice than red band (because Lanthanum is not radioactive) and are used for the same purposes.

Orange band is 2% Ceriated (Cerium oxide) is another non-radioactive replacement for thoria - good for low current applications becasue the arc starts very easily - not as stable at high temperature.

Brown band is 2% Zirconiated (zirconium oxide) - used for ac welding - my personal favorite for aluminum applications because it doesn't ball up.

When grinding Th (red band) electrodes you should do it in a well ventilated area and use a dust mask. Better yet, avoid red band altogether. The amount of dust generated may be very small, but why risk cancer when it can be avoided.