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nimda
02-14-2004, 07:00 AM
hi, i'm new to this forum (and to CNC too actually)

i'm building a 3 axis woodworking cnc atm using small stepper motors, and i'm already thinking about my next project: a 5 axis metalworking cnc using servo motors :D

i was wondering a few things. my end project is to machine turbines to build jet engines for R/C models.
so first question: is a homemade CNC strong/powerfull enough to machine hard metal, like steel, for a 'reasonnable' price (hey! its just a hobby...)

and in this case, what kind of hardware do i need? (servo motors/drivers)

and the bonus question: do you know resellers for this hardware in europe?

thank you :)
nimda

ballendo
02-14-2004, 11:06 AM
Hello,

You're in luck! Richard Bartlett in the UK has a company called compucutters, and a program called compucut. Along with a DIY-CNC plans set for a machine that is a bit unconventional, compared to what we see here in the "zone"...

It's not 5 axis, but the design is intended for, and well proven with, turbine parts. And hard metals like ss316, nimonic and inconel...

A yahoo search of compucut will pull it right up...

Ballendo


Originally posted by nimda
hi, i'm new to this forum (and to CNC too actually)

i'm building a 3 axis woodworking cnc atm using small stepper motors, and i'm already thinking about my next project: a 5 axis metalworking cnc using servo motors :D

i was wondering a few things. my end project is to machine turbines to build jet engines for R/C models.
so first question: is a homemade CNC strong/powerfull enough to machine hard metal, like steel, for a 'reasonnable' price (hey! its just a hobby...)

and in this case, what kind of hardware do i need? (servo motors/drivers)

and the bonus question: do you know resellers for this hardware in europe?

thank you :)
nimda

nimda
02-15-2004, 06:57 AM
very interesting design, thx ballendo :)

well this website proves it actually is possible to machine turbines with a 3 axis setup. pulling the price down, good thing but the problem with this setup is that it's very specific, and i want to be able to do 'standard' 3 axis machining.

i'm gonna think about a 3 axis setup + 1 're/movable' axis specifically for turbines. i think it can be done this way...

but i still need powerfull servos/drivers to machine steel, any suggest?

thx again :)

nimda
02-15-2004, 12:17 PM
well, looks like geckos servo drives G320 are pretty famous in the world of homemade CNC. i'm prolly gonna use geckos then.

now i need motors... what should i get? (to be able to machine strong metal with decent speed)

thx :)

edit: http://www.parvex.com/pdf/us/com/3366-US.pdf will the RX 330 C do the job?