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View Full Version : New Machine Build CRP4848 -Question on Table size



SteveChlupsa
12-25-2015, 10:53 AM
Is there any reason CRP does not provide an assembly manual for their products??????
Even every cheap workbench/furniture I've built came with a step by step manual.............

All the videos seem to be done by customers??????? You mean to tell me CRP hasn't done assembly videos on it's own products? :confused:

Just trying to find proper table size for a 48x48 has been interesting.

I saw a post from Cory from CRP that said a max of 49" width. But my inner brace extrusions are 54"?????? That would leave the braces of the machine hanging over the edge by 2"???

Is that right?


THX and Merry Christmas!

HighDesert
12-25-2015, 11:31 AM
Hi Steve,

I haven't purchased my Pro4848 machine yet, but have spent a great deal of time studying the eDrawings provided by CNC Router Parts as well as their Tips and Tricks for Pro CNC Machine Build (http://www.cncrouterparts.com/tips-and-tricks-for-pro-cnc-machine-construction-p-272.html) page. The max table width cannot exceed the length of inner brace extrusions due to the fact that rail clamps are mounted to bottom of the Y-Axis (some call it X-Axis) extrusion. The eDrawings indicate those inner brace extrusions are 49.213" long, so you'll have to find out from them why yours are longer. I'm assuming you didn't order a custom size. The gantry extrusion should be 61.023", again according to the published eDrawings. Is that what yours measures?

Ed

SteveChlupsa
12-25-2015, 11:50 AM
Ed- according to the pdf on cncrp's site the cross braces (5) are 54" long. This is for the STANDARD version that I have.

http://www.cncrouterparts.com/cad/CRP4848/CRP4848-2012Q2/CRP110-00-4848.PDF

NOTE- the PRO versions cross braces are 49.2" Why are they different???

THX for the quick response!

HighDesert
12-25-2015, 12:10 PM
Sorry, I misread your post, thinking you had the Pro4848. I suspect the comment you saw from Cory was also in reference to the Pro version as that was the information I was given for table design. As to why they are wider, I'm sure it is due to the rail design and desired usable work area. It looks like your braces are a little short rather than too long.

Ed

SteveChlupsa
12-25-2015, 02:23 PM
Just had to let you guys know I just got a call from Ahren from CRP...(yes on Christmas Day) and he answered my questions on the table issue. (max 57" width on STANDARD version 4848)

How's that for customer service? THX AHREN!

Looking forward to the build and from help from CRP and you guys!

HighDesert
12-25-2015, 02:56 PM
Good to hear. CRP really seems to be a stand-up bunch. Hope I can also do business with them sometime in the coming months.

Hope you Steve, Ahren and Cory are all having a great Christmas Day and wishing for a safe and prosperous New Year!

Ed

SixOfOne
12-25-2015, 04:06 PM
I just welded up a base for my PRO 4824. The width has to be 49" max b/c of the way the V-con rails and E-chain trays mount to the bottom of the side extrusions.

LeeWay
12-26-2015, 04:21 AM
I have an older version of the standard, built to my own specs, and a new Pro 4824. Two totally different machines. :) Both good machines though.

The pictures, tips and tricks etc that are on the CRP site will get you 99.9% of the way there. They update the products often enough that an actual manual would become obsolete before it went live. I would much rather prefer better machine offerings and updates than an accurate assembly manual. Great machines. Great prices. Excellent service. No assembly manual. No problem. :)

recmob
12-26-2015, 12:05 PM
Is there any reason CRP does not provide an assembly manual for their products?????? Even every cheap workbench/furniture I've built came with a step by step manual............. All the videos seem to be done by customers??????? You mean to tell me CRP hasn't done assembly videos on it's own products?

I just finished a Pro 4896 and I too was concerned with lack of a assembly manual. However, on their website they provide several documents to use AND the order in which the assemblies should occur. Yes there was a bit of head scratching here and there, but overall it really wasn't difficult. In a conversation I had with Cory last month, he indicated the company had plans for the following year to completely rewrite he manuals, and asked me for input on what could be better.

I build full size, kit aircraft for a living. I've worked for 3 kit plane manufacturers prior to striking out on my own 18 yrs ago. One of the many hats I wore was writing the assembly manuals, technical support, etc for builders - on top of making parts and assembling the aircraft. I haven't spoken to anyone other then Cory at CNCRP, and I don't know what role Cory has in the company (owner, etc) but they have the right attitude and drive - and that in opinion goes a long, long way.

As a side note, I seriously considered a competitors product first. That company makes a nice machine also, though not as big as the one I purchased. That companies owner said he had a new website that would be loaded over a weekend - that was 3 months ago, and the pages are still blank. I inquired with Cory regarding a question on a port / pin assignment noted their website. Within minutes I received a reply back that I had pointed out something that was incorrect, the website had been corrected, and a big thank you for bringing it their attention.

Though I haven't sent this to Cory yet, here's my suggestions for better documention:

1) Some of the photos in the assembly docs are close ups. That's great, but a overall photo of where the close up is in the assembly will help with the head scratching.

2) Host larger photos on the server, with scaled down photos on the documents to make loading faster. Click-to-enlarge photos would help with details that cannot be easily seen.

3) On the Cable Chain Tracks, there are rough dimensions given as to where to attach the end of the track to the cable tray. After routing all the cabling and wiring (and finally moving the gantry) I found I needed to relocate the bottom end as it was stretched to much when moved to the outer limit. Attaching to the upper end first, moving the gantry and finding where the bottom end should be attached would have been much easier.

4) A procedure for 'how' to square the gantry

The above is really pretty minor, and from my experience in writing manuals I tend to believe in giving more information then is necessary - cuts down on the support requests - however that also cuts down on customer interaction which can be a negative in some respects.