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rcazwillis
12-17-2006, 09:38 PM
I have wanted to build a steam engine from scratch for a while. Today I started the "Jingle Bell" engine from http://npmccabe.tripod.com/jinglebellmotor.htm. I like the look of this engine and have almost enough material on hand to finish it.

I drew up the plans in cad, used Sheetcam, and cut the fly wheel today my HF CNCed mill. I will cut the frame next.

RBrandes
12-18-2006, 07:18 AM
Cool! Steam is the reason I became a machinest, but at 58 years young, I have yet to build one. I didn't know of this design and It looks like I could knock it out in a morning. I'll have to see what is in the scrap bin (grin).
Regards, Ray in FLA

ARF
12-18-2006, 12:48 PM
Hi !

I 'm a newbie and love reading the articles in this great site.

I would like to thank you all & wish you a " Merry Christmas " & a great " New Year "

Michael4yah
12-18-2006, 03:58 PM
Anyone out there know of an application where steam could power a generator? Merry Christmas , Michael

rpape
12-18-2006, 08:34 PM
I made a double acting oscillating steam engine from the plans by Eric-Jan Stroetinga. I have a close-to-stock engine detailed on my web site at: http://members.shaw.ca/rpape or http://members.shaw.ca/clc_switcher. I can provide the plans in the original metric, or my english measure conversion to any one who wants them. Eric-Jan has given me permission to post them. The engine took me about 15 days to build. I'm not a machinist by trade and don't really know what I'm doing. I'm good at math, though, so the valves are right. I made DXF 3d drawing of the most difficult to maunfacture part on the web page with a Java DXF viewer to view it.

nick.gilling
12-19-2006, 06:01 AM
The oscillating engine at the top looks like a very simple design, excellent for the beginner. I find half the fun is in designing one yourself, it takes a bit longer but it's nice to see a design of your own working.

A steam engine could power a generator, you'd have to design the engine of a suitable size to provide the power you want from the generator obviously. It would just be a novelty really though, it's not going to be a very efficient way of generating electricity!

Michael4yah
12-19-2006, 04:04 PM
I agree about steam not being the most efficient way of generating power but theres one thing about steam power that is attractive. Theres an abundance of fuel in wood or coal. In a remote location where fuel would be a problem Id think that steam would be a great source of both electricity, heating and you could even route the steam to heat a still to make alcohol fuel for other engines. Should things in this world get really bad it will be the technology of the 1800s that will be the easiest and most reliable to start back up with. As you can guess Im interrested in steam mostly from a survivalists point of view. Im not saying the sky is falling but a person would have to be blind not to see the steady progression of events. I hope these comments dont turn people off. They werent meant to be.
Michael

The Inventor
12-19-2006, 07:28 PM
Michael,
Also look into the Stirling Engines.. much higher in efficiency.
Some motors run on the heat of your hand or small candle(s)/alcohol lamps.
I'm looking at one that's small enough to hold in your hands and gives out 25/35 HP.
so you're looking at a 20/30 KW Generator.
Also look into Solid State Generators -- they require less HP to turn.
You can also use car Alt. and convert them as well.

nick.gilling
12-20-2006, 05:36 AM
I agree with all the points made there. Suppose you'd need to make some sort of circuit to drive the feed pump to keep the water level in the boiler. Otherwise it would require constant attention.

Anyway, this topic is in danger of going off topic, maybe these issues should be brought up in a separate thread. I believe some of them have been discussed in a stirling post.

RBrandes
12-22-2006, 07:19 PM
The reason I became a machinist was to build little steam engines. Now, at 58, I have finally finished one! Here is a movie of it running on about 10psi.
Click Here (http://www.foundry.ray-vin.com/rvbjingle.mpg)
I'll take it apart tomorrow and polish the parts.
Watch out for errors and ommisions in those Jingle drawings! Seems .480 should be .280...
Regards, Ray in FLA

nick.gilling
12-24-2006, 02:08 PM
Well done, I love that feeling when you've made something yourself and it works!

I will have to get back in the garage myself.

thkoutsidthebox
12-24-2006, 03:42 PM
The reason I became a machinist was to build little steam engines. Now, at 58, I have finally finished one! Here is a movie of it running on about 10psi.
Click Here (http://www.foundry.ray-vin.com/rvbjingle.mpg)
I'll take it apart tomorrow and polish the parts.
Watch out for errors and ommisions in those Jingle drawings! Seems .480 should be .280...
Regards, Ray in FLA

How does that work?

Where is the steam/water going in/out?

Sorry for the lack of knowledge. It looks great by the way. :)

RBrandes
12-24-2006, 03:50 PM
Nick,
Thanks for the kind words. It is mesmorizing to watch that little thing tick over at around 10psi. My next project will be a 3-sisters wobler. I read where these are self tarting. Regards, Ray in FLA
http://www.foundry.ray-vin.com/images/3sisters.jpg

RBrandes
12-24-2006, 04:59 PM
How does that work?

Where is the steam/water going in/out?

Sorry for the lack of knowledge. It looks great by the way. :)

The cylinder pivots back and fourth. There is a hole in the top of the cylinder facing the frame. The frame has two holes, one left and one right. Steam or air pressure is presented at one of these holes, the other is for exhaust. As the crank turns the cylinder rocks and the cylinder port overlaps the steam port. The steam gets to the piston head and pushes it towards the crank. As the crank passes bdc the cylinder rocks and aligns its port with the exhaust and presure escapes. The flat faces of the frame and cylinder surrounding the ports provide the seal. The spring supplies presure against the steam.
The occislating or wobbler is the simpelest engine to built:
Frame, Cylinder, Piston, Crank, Flywheel a screw and spring.
Look at the link in the first post of this thread.
Regards, Ray

rcazwillis
01-02-2007, 10:43 PM
I finished mine today. Runs well on about 15 psi and is breaking in very quickly. Made it of aluminum with a brass piston. It is a joy to watch it run. Now I have to figure out how to get portable air to it. I am sending this one to my Grandfather (91 soon) who is retired railroad. I am thinking canned air will work. He is in assisted living and has no compressor, etc. Any thoughts?

rcazwillis
01-02-2007, 10:51 PM
Nick,
Thanks for the kind words. It is mesmorizing to watch that little thing tick over at around 10psi. My next project will be a 3-sisters wobler. I read where these are self tarting. Regards, Ray in FLA
http://www.foundry.ray-vin.com/images/3sisters.jpg

There is also a four cylinder one with the same basic design. I think it will be my next one.

balsaman
01-02-2007, 11:48 PM
Canned air will work but will be expensive.

E

rcazwillis
01-03-2007, 09:50 PM
I was thinking tonight about ports on this steam engine. Besides restriction of air flow, how do port sizes impact the performance of a steam engine? Should the exhaust port be large in comparison to let the pressurized gas escape easily? Is back pressure for exaust important? Just some random thoughts.

I have attached the g-code files I used with Mach3 to cut the parts. These could be improved substantially, like adding drilling cycles to drill holes to proper depths. I just peck .01 to mark the holes and drill by hand later.

I drew these based on the plans at the link in my original post. You will need the plans to finish the engine.

(edit to add attachments with acceptable extensions)

nick.gilling
01-04-2007, 05:38 AM
If the port sizes are too small it will cause restriction on inlet and exhaust so I would say that is the only thing to watch for really.

You don't want any back pressure ideally, the less back pressure, the better the engine will run since it is just the stored energy in the flywheel used to expell the exhaust steam in a single acting engine and a combination of that and the other power stroke in a double acting engine.

I would say the port sizes are a function of the cylinder bore more than anything else, obviously the stroke as well (overall swept volume).

I don't think you will be able to make the ports too large on an engine like the one you are doing, the only problem I can see with ports that are too large is too much steam held in the pipes leading to the engine which may condense too much possibly. Obviously this wouldn't be a problem if the engine was run on air.

Anyone else have any thoughts?

RBrandes
01-04-2007, 08:29 AM
Nick summed it up. In a wobbler the cylinder port and frame ports have a lot to do with timing. If running on air, the bigger the line running to those ports the better. If on steam, you should insulate the line.
I read years ago about condensing vs. non-condensing steam engines. Non-condensing exhausts to atmosphere, about 15psi. Condensing exhausts to even negative pressures sometimes. The gain in efficency is more than you would expect for a 15 psi differential.
Regards, Ray in FLA

rcazwillis
01-07-2007, 09:49 PM
Canned air works. However, the air gets very cold causing the engine to get very cold and slow down quickly. Here is a link to a video of it running. To connect the canned air, I turned a piece of brass to fit the port on one side and the rubber hose on the other. The hose is fuel line from an RC airplane. Notice the sophisticated hose clamp holding the hose the plastic spray nozzle.

http://rcazparts.com/mill/jinglebell5.mpg

nick.gilling
01-08-2007, 04:47 AM
I've tried canned air in the past too, as rcazwillis says, the engine gets really cold and slows down also, I found that you had to shake the can otherwise the air flow slowed right down, couldn't understand that, I was using one from a humbrol airbrush.

RBrandes
01-08-2007, 06:22 AM
I've tried canned air in the past too, as rcazwillis ...
Nick,
I'll bet you could make a little gadget to hold and peirce a CO2 cartridge. Perhaps some kind of needle valve could regulate the speed.
Regards, Ray

nick.gilling
01-08-2007, 07:17 AM
Ray,

Never thought of using CO2 but now you come to mention it, I already have one of those on the mig welder I've just bought.

I've not used the welder yet (only practice runs) but I doubt if the gas would last very long running an engine on it.

Michael4yah
01-14-2007, 09:24 PM
Has anyone seen a Brown Steam engine built? He has some larger designs that would power a 10KW generator. Also has anyone bought a Industrial Hobbies machine? I hear they are going through a ownership change. Any imput would be appreciated. Michael

WeCheat
01-15-2007, 09:18 PM
Go to the paintball store and get a co2 tank and reg cost about $3.00 to 5.00 to fill a 20oz tank.

harryn
06-25-2007, 02:14 AM
I suppose you could send him a small compressor. Noisy, but if he is like my Dad, he might not hear it anyway.

rcazwillis
06-25-2007, 01:03 PM
I used the can of air. It worked fine for the situation. The compressor would not have been an issue for him, but others around him might have an issue. It worked out in the end.


I suppose you could send him a small compressor. Noisy, but if he is like my Dad, he might not hear it anyway.

asalvadorm
11-09-2009, 05:27 PM
helloto all member cnczone