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FoxCNC1
08-07-2014, 10:14 PM
I have been really thinking of moving my machine to the garage (a one car garage).
it will be tight, but it will be better regarding noise and dust, not to mention that it will be on a concrete floor and not on wood joist (See other thread).

I want to know if anyone can chime in with regards to rust forming on the steel rails or other parts etc. I live in Florida and it is very hummind all year round. This is part of the reason I have considered keeping the machine inside. The same concern applies to the electronics.

nlancaster
08-07-2014, 11:31 PM
You will have to keep something on the rails to keep the rust cancer from starting. I live in Portland Oregon and while we do not have the humidity that you do, it is still a wet area. One thing I have thought for my machine is making a cover that goes to the floor and putting a few of these (http://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/store/product/damprid-hi-capacity-moisture-absorber/1017732404?device=c&network=g&matchtype=&mcid=PS_googlepla_nonbrand_cleaning_&gclid=CJ74prjdgsACFSMLMgodlyMARQ) under the cover when I am not using it during the wet season.

FoxCNC1
08-07-2014, 11:38 PM
interesting... yeah something to consider since there is no AC in my garage

CYoung
08-07-2014, 11:58 PM
I live 1 mile from the ocean in southern California and have only had my pro4848 for about 6 weeks and I just noticed some rust on the y axis rack starting to form. My plan is to keep it wiped down with wd40. After all wd40 was invented for repelling water from missile components. I just took a wd40 soaked rag and wiped down the racks and rails.

nlancaster
08-08-2014, 02:18 AM
That is my plan as well for week to week operation. But in the depth of winter when its consitantly 50f or less, i may wrap the machine and put in the desicant packs to keep it dry. IE when I may not be using it for weeks at a time.

CYoung
08-08-2014, 02:27 AM
If you run it in the winter, it will definitely self heat the garage. My last machine was just a little home-made machine, but it would raise the temp in my 2 car garage noticeably. If I lived in snow country (like where I grew up), I would be running my machine more in the winter than in the summer. What else can you do, might as well make stuff!

FoxCNC1
08-08-2014, 03:16 PM
What about the electronic components inside the control box? The geckos and PMDX?
What about the ball screw and its components..

CYoung
08-08-2014, 04:05 PM
Not surr . I understand your question?

FoxCNC1
08-08-2014, 04:13 PM
Would they get damaged being in a hot humid garage.
Will the ballscrew rust?

ger21
08-08-2014, 05:46 PM
The ballscrew should be lubricated with oil or grease, so as long as it's used once in a while, it shouldn't rust.

The electronics should be fine, unless you run them while they are very wet with condensation. But you'd usually only see that when everything goes from cold to warm rapidly, which I doubt you'd see in Florida.

FoxCNC1
08-08-2014, 11:09 PM
I was thinking the electronics would rust..

nlancaster
08-08-2014, 11:39 PM
Nah, the electronics other then at the connection points are all varnished, and copper doesnt really rust. it just gets tarnished when exposed to air. If you are really worried about moisture in with the electronics stick in some desiccant packs.

FoxCNC1
08-09-2014, 10:27 AM
Thanks, let's see what o come up with

slowlearner
08-09-2014, 10:41 AM
I am in Al. and we have a humid climate as well. I have one vmc that requires a dehumidifier piped into the control cabinet in order for it to operate.
Might not be needed in your case but it was a cheap solution for me.

FoxCNC1
08-09-2014, 11:28 AM
Will you post a picture?

crashn
08-09-2014, 09:04 PM
use Boeshield. Developed by the boeing company to prevent rust. I (and alot of woodworkers) use it on steel and cast iron to prevent rust. Stuff works.

nlancaster
08-09-2014, 11:49 PM
I have tried boeshield and it caused a waxy build up. I followed the directions and it still happened. Captured dust like no tomarrow!

ger21
08-10-2014, 10:27 AM
I've always used TopCoat, and it's kept my table saw and other tools rust free for 20 years.

FoxCNC1
08-10-2014, 10:31 AM
Does it leave them oily?

ger21
08-10-2014, 10:34 AM
Top Coat is a dry finish. Spray it on, let it dry, then wipe it off. Just like a wax. Leaves a clean, dry surface. Doesn't attract any dust.

FoxCNC1
08-10-2014, 10:36 AM
Ger, who makes it or where to they sell it. Google failed me. I was looking for TopCoat protectant

ger21
08-10-2014, 11:21 AM
Looks like they changed the name of it to GlideCoat.

Bostik 10220 Aerosol Top-Cote - Power Tool Lubricants - Amazon.com (http://www.amazon.com/Bostik-10220-Aerosol-Top-Cote/dp/B0000223UD)

You can usually find it at Rockler or Woodcraft if you have one near you

FoxCNC1
08-10-2014, 12:26 PM
Top Coat is a dry finish. Spray it on, let it dry, then wipe it off. Just like a wax. Leaves a clean, dry surface. Doesn't attract any dust.

It sounds similar to the T9 stuff no?

ger21
08-10-2014, 01:21 PM
Yes, but I've never used the Boeshield stuff. Been using Top Coat (GlideCoat) forever. It works great, so I've never had a need to try anything else.

groov
08-11-2014, 08:26 PM
Live in Florida and I have had my machines (CNC mill & a Lathe) in my garage for the last 6 years, I have taken steps in providing a couple of air vents with a regulated damper....not very much rust on the ways...i keep them oiled. Of course this is my only domain and the wife has the rest of the house....a compromise.

FoxCNC1
08-11-2014, 11:33 PM
^ In other words, if you could keep your machine inside you would.

groov
08-12-2014, 04:15 PM
FoxCNC1, I am assuming you are directing your comment to my last post.....Well, I don't think I want to keep my machines in the house because of the noise they generate and the space they require, at least in my case. The machines are already taking space in the garage where there is only enough room for one car. I rather keep them in the there providing there is enough comfort (a/c) to make it bearable (~ 80F) during the hot summer days.

FoxCNC1
08-12-2014, 05:13 PM
FoxCNC1, I am assuming you are directing your comment to my last post.....Well, I don't think I want to keep my machines in the house because of the noise they generate and the space they require, at least in my case. The machines are already taking space in the garage where there is only enough room for one car. I rather keep them in the there providing there is enough comfort (a/c) to make it bearable (~ 80F) during the hot summer days.

I appreciate you response. I too think its bit loud, if I had AC in my garage it would just put there and call it a day, but being able to cut and "make mess in the garage" is really nice.
In the past I have had good experience collecting the dust via a cyclone in an large apartment bedroom.

Maybe the solution will be to bring AC into my garage at some point.

groov
08-12-2014, 07:06 PM
My a/c unit is in the garage and was able to pull a branch with a couple of vents, didn't brake the bank. It can always be closed with a damper...not too bad right now with all the heat and humidity. You won't regret it if you go that route....cheers.

wwendorf
08-13-2014, 08:15 AM
If you decide to get AC in the garage, check out a Senville Heat Pump (http://www.allergyandair.com/senville-aura-series-24000-btu-single-zone-mini-split/SENA24HF.html?mtcpromotion=PLA%3EAir_Conditioning%3EMini_Split_Air_Conditioners%3ESingle_Zone%3ESENA24HF&src=SHOPPING&kpid=SENA24HF&CAWELAID=120127120000006032&CAGPSPN=pla&kpid=SENA24HF&gclid=Cj0KEQjwmayfBRDo25CR9un4hvEBEiQAv9fBbV5ayA2NJfFycFNnADypaWPHovIk6YTc_8j3qLbtCWAaAqXi8P8HAQ) (aka Mini Split system). I bought one for $1500, and it heats and cools both, and it's cheap. Plus you can put it in dehumidifier mode to get the dampness out as well.

Wade

vtx1029
08-13-2014, 10:13 AM
Dehumidifiers work wonders in garages! I ran one in my garage for years before it went belly up.

cstmwrks
03-13-2015, 02:27 PM
If you run it in the winter, it will definitely self heat the garage. My last machine was just a little home-made machine, but it would raise the temp in my 2 car garage noticeably. If I lived in snow country (like where I grew up), I would be running my machine more in the winter than in the summer. What else can you do, might as well make stuff!
I know this is kinda dragging up an old thread, hopefully not beat to death yet. With luck I'll have ordered my PRO 4848 in less than 30 days. That will be the easy part. I know the most ideal location would be a fully climate controlled shop. Second would be the home garage... right now I'm entertaining life on a covered concrete patio deck. It would be in southwest Idaho, so dry air for the most part. Summer is a non issue but winters can drop below zero for a time and it does rain.

The only reason I'm entertaining the patio deck is room. Hands down I'll have more spare room around the machine. It's not like it would be out in direct sunlight as the patio would be semi enclosed. For noise abatement I figured it would be inside a booth with large swing open doors. A small heating element could be used to keep the booth interior above freezing in the winter. Worst case this would be for 2 years, after that it should find it's way to a roomy shop.

Thoughts? Put more effort into fitting it in the garage?

CYoung
03-13-2015, 04:40 PM
Its not ideal but if there is a will, there is a way! The few things I can think of that you want to address would be;
-Noise - Not sure your situation, but think about running a large router outside for a few hours. Profiling and pocketing can be pretty loud.
-Corrosion - Most is alum and wood, so no issues with those items. The steel rails will rust quickly if not tended to. I just wipe mine down with a WD40 socked rag after each time I use it....or a few times a month.
-Electronics - Subzero can be a problem for PCs and CNC drivers. If you build a portable electronics box and just keep it in the house (with the PC) when not is use, that should be fine. I am in the early stages of building my custom CNC Electronics box (plywood and Plexiglass) and everything will just plug into it with bulkhead mounted connectors. You could do the same.

The biggest obstacle I see is actually using the machine when its subzero! I would think that would be "prime time" for working on things.

cstmwrks
03-13-2015, 06:16 PM
Its not ideal but if there is a will, there is a way! The few things I can think of that you want to address would be;
-Noise - Not sure your situation, but think about running a large router outside for a few hours. Profiling and pocketing can be pretty loud.
The more I think about the problems VS the space it points to make the garage work some how.

-Corrosion - Most is alum and wood, so no issues with those items. The steel rails will rust quickly if not tended to. I just wipe mine down with a WD40 socked rag after each time I use it....or a few times a month. Yeah, saw the recommendations of several products for that issue.

-Electronics - Subzero can be a problem for PCs and CNC drivers. If you build a portable electronics box and just keep it in the house (with the PC) when not is use, that should be fine. I am in the early stages of building my custom CNC Electronics box (plywood and Plexiglass) and everything will just plug into it with bulkhead mounted connectors. You could do the same. That was the one troubling me the most. Temp swings and PC's don't like each other.


The biggest obstacle I see is actually using the machine when its subzero! I would think that would be "prime time" for working on things.
So hear is a thought / question. Call me dumb or a possible trend setter, but I thought of just making a 2x8 frame and setting it on the floor. a high but usable work bench would go over the top. At this point I have no experience in dealing with setting up of sheet material for cutting so I have no clue if this would be real bad.. or by some freak of nature it some how worked out real well. Knee pads or floor pads to keep joints from any undue stress. It's the 4848 PRO.. It would make for a cheap table and no worries about it not handling the inertia.