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Rebelac
08-06-2014, 07:11 PM
I thought I would check for any interest on our CRP4848 machine before listing it.
It's brand new and needs finished assembly. We just don't have time for this, we are looking at other brands.

Tim Schoenhals
08-06-2014, 11:10 PM
PM Sent

Rebelac
08-08-2014, 04:06 PM
Although I have received quite a few messages about this machine, I'm a little surprised at the lack of responses. This to me, is an indicator that I should have done much more research on this brand and company.
It has all worked out though, my business partner decided to purchase my share of the machine and complete building it. I wished him the best of luck, he will need it.

I have ordered a new machine and I'm looking forward to actually getting into the cnc operation.

awerby
08-08-2014, 05:10 PM
So what did you get instead? The CNCRP machines generally get quite favorable reviews here; I don't think you should take the lack of response to your rather vague offer as any indication of disfavor. Most people on this site already have a machine or are in the process of building one. But it sounds like you had some kind of difficulty - since you're not trying to sell your machine at this point, would you care to share what the problems were, and how you tried to solve them?

pdwatermelon
08-08-2014, 05:11 PM
Just saw this thread, curious what other machine did you get? Also how much of the current machine was finished?

Rebelac
08-08-2014, 07:49 PM
So what did you get instead? The CNCRP machines generally get quite favorable reviews here; I don't think you should take the lack of response to your rather vague offer as any indication of disfavor. Most people on this site already have a machine or are in the process of building one. But it sounds like you had some kind of difficulty - since you're not trying to sell your machine at this point, would you care to share what the problems were, and how you tried to solve them?

My post was vague because it was just to see if there was interest enough to actually list it for sale with all of the particulars. After all, there are only a couple of configurations available. The documentation for assembly is very limited and most of it is incorrect. By following their assembly as described, I ended up disassembling and reassembling parts several times. I was assured several times, that this machine could be assembled and operational in 12 - 16 hours. Don't believe it. I had numerous issues with the z-axis. Even after receiving replacement parts, it still will NOT go together based on their instructions. Being new to cnc, I'm on the understanding that precise assembly creates a precise cutting machine. That is difficult to accomplish when the information given for assembly is incorrect and having to remove parts to assemble it properly. I communicated with Cory on many occasions without any resolve from his end.
I'm sure there are people that are happy with their purchase and the end result, but for me, I regret purchasing mine. There are fully assembled machines available from many sources for a little more than I paid for an incomplete machine that I was expected to figure out how to assemble. And there are many more parts that need to be purchased such as a table, prox. switches, z plate, etc. that are included with the other brands. After all of the other items needed to complete this machine, the price becomes much closer to the fully assembled competitors.



Just saw this thread, curious what other machine did you get? Also how much of the current machine was finished?


I went with a well supported, well reviewed, fully inclusive and assembled ShopBot. I should be cutting before the other machine even sees power.

The machine was assembled up to the z-axis where the biggest problems appeared. We are moving it to it's new location tomorrow.

I am not able to recommend this machine after my experience. I could have been cutting for the past two months if I had followed my instinct.

ger21
08-08-2014, 08:08 PM
I was assured several times, that this machine could be assembled and operational in 12 - 16 hours.

There are probably more than 25 cnc router parts build threads here, and 12-16 hours would probably be the fastest one I've seen, by a large margin.

If that's what they're telling their customers, they might want to rethink that.

As far as a Shopbot being just a little more money. I'm not sure I can agree with that. A 2x4 Buddy is over $10K ready to run. What model did you purchase?

A CNC Router parts machine should be about 1/2 the cost of a Shopbot, especially when you get into the 4x4 and larger sizes.

Rebelac
08-08-2014, 08:46 PM
There are probably more than 25 cnc router parts build threads here, and 12-16 hours would probably be the fastest one I've seen, by a large margin.

If that's what they're telling their customers, they might want to rethink that.

As far as a Shopbot being just a little more money. I'm not sure I can agree with that. A 2x4 Buddy is over $10K ready to run. What model did you purchase?

A CNC Router parts machine should be about 1/2 the cost of a Shopbot, especially when you get into the 4x4 and larger sizes.


I was told at least twice in emails and twice on the phone that this machine could be running in 12 - 16 hours. And never building a machine, I took Cory's word for it and reviewing their website makes it sound fairly simple and possible. After getting started with the build, I found the extremely lacking pertinent information and the incorrect information which created the majority of the issues and unbolting and re-bolting of the assemblies. The information is scattered around their site rather than in an organized manner. I have more than 12 hours in trying to figure out the z-axis.

The 24 x 48 buddy only goes over $10K if you include the router, bit pkg., and caster kit, which also has to be purchased for the CRP machines. I don't need those items, so that machine would be $9525. I opted for the 24 x 32 at a cost of $7745. I realize the cutting area is a bit smaller, but is a good compromise. That cost is for a fully optioned, assembled, tested, warranted, and supported machine. If the CRP is comparably equipped, the price difference is minimal. It is definitely worth a grand to me to have an assembled, tested, calibrated and warranted machine. The buddy's can also be expanded to 96" with the addition of the powerstick. Expanding the CRP would require lengthening the table, additional extrusion, rack gears, brackets, and bolts/nuts. If I could go larger than a 4 x 4 machine, it would definitely be an assembled machine and is absolutely worth the cost. Of coarse, this is JMO and my experience. YMMV

BuckNaked31
08-09-2014, 04:42 AM
So, let me get this straight... you received a lot of messages about the machine, but you are surprised by the lack of response? And you can't figured out how to put the machine together, so you are giving up and are going to sell it? The machine is so simple to setup it's not even funny and to top it all off, there is plenty of help to be had here, all you have to do is ask. It sounds to me like you have no patience, not a trait that is gonna help you with a CNC for sure! As far as setting up the machine in 12 to 16 hours, no problem... any day of the week, I'll take that challenge. I may sound a little harsh, but good Lord man, what the hell? Have you downloaded the assembly? Just looking at the 3d model will tell you how to assemble it. A set of wrenches, couple screwdrivers, digital calipers and some setup blocks and you're done. I guess we can all look forward to you cursing the Shopbot when you start making rookie mistakes on it and get frustrated? I'm guessing you forgot some fasteners in those extrusions and had to disassemble them and put it back together? Suck it up dude, it happens to everybody...

Sent from my LGMS769 using Tapatalk 2

Rebelac
08-09-2014, 10:13 AM
So, let me get this straight... you received a lot of messages about the machine, but you are surprised by the lack of response? And you can't figured out how to put the machine together, so you are giving up and are going to sell it? The machine is so simple to setup it's not even funny and to top it all off, there is plenty of help to be had here, all you have to do is ask. It sounds to me like you have no patience, not a trait that is gonna help you with a CNC for sure! As far as setting up the machine in 12 to 16 hours, no problem... any day of the week, I'll take that challenge. I may sound a little harsh, but good Lord man, what the hell? Have you downloaded the assembly? Just looking at the 3d model will tell you how to assemble it. A set of wrenches, couple screwdrivers, digital calipers and some setup blocks and you're done. I guess we can all look forward to you cursing the Shopbot when you start making rookie mistakes on it and get frustrated? I'm guessing you forgot some fasteners in those extrusions and had to disassemble them and put it back together? Suck it up dude, it happens to everybody...

Sent from my LGMS769 using Tapatalk 2

Yep, you have it all figured out. My hero! You must be associated with the company.

I'm finished with this thread...the machine is gone.

vtx1029
08-09-2014, 10:24 AM
It may piss you off what Bucknaked wrote but there is a lot of truth to it. One thing I've learned with cnc is it takes a lot of time and $. The learning curve is steep and it takes time, your mistakes will be your best lessons.

nlancaster
08-09-2014, 11:14 AM
Being in the middle of a build of a CRP4848, I can say the 12-16 hour assembly time is a bit aggressive but possible. I think I am about 8-10 hours into it and ready to start on the z-axis assembly. That being said, I knew from reading this forum what I was getting into. And even if it took me 50 hours to assembly, thats still less time then money to purchase a much smaller shopbot.

Dan911
08-09-2014, 11:47 AM
That being said, I knew from reading this forum what I was getting into. And even if it took me 50 hours to assembly, thats still less time then money to purchase a much smaller shopbot.

By looking at your join date here at cnczone it seems to me you might of jumped into this and didn't start your research until now. I read in your other problem post you were given videos and replacement parts. With a little more patience and reading you will find yourself with a good machine.

Good Luck,
Dan

nlancaster
08-09-2014, 12:59 PM
wait, I am not the one selling. :D I was just saying I knew what I was getting into, and fully expected a few of the issues I have run into. And I still have to wire up all the electronics before I can complete my machine. I had a Joes CNC 2006 that I purchased used and added my own electronics too. That was a HUGE learn experience, took 3 months of a few hours every weekend to get tweaked and up and running to produce good parts.

I think this CRP4848 will be much better.

Basically what I was trying to say is the OP may have jumped in without doing enough research on what he was getting into.

Saying that, I do agree with him, the documentation is not the best. But I knew about the documentation issues before I started building the machine. But totally usable to build a great machine as evidenced by all the other machines that have been completed, and the progress I am making on my own machine.

ger21
08-09-2014, 01:06 PM
In the OP's defense, do any of you seriously think you can have this machine up and running in 12 hours, with no previous cnc experience?

nlancaster
08-09-2014, 01:14 PM
Gerry, I don't think anyone could build this machine in less then 12 hours. There are just too many pieces, and the documentation is not that great.

Dan911
08-09-2014, 05:08 PM
Hi nlancaster, my post was for Rebelac and sorry for quoting you and causing confusion. This is a DIY forum and thought what you wrote was perfect. I been lingering around for a few years now and still rely on this forum and searches here for help and answers.

Is it possible to have one of these kits assembled in 12-16 hours?... Absolutely

Is it possible to do with no experience, without many hours of reading other threads, builds and watching videos?...I couldn't.

JMO,
Dan

JoeBean_NEW
08-10-2014, 11:02 AM
In the OP's defense, do any of you seriously think you can have this machine up and running in 12 hours, with no previous cnc experience?

In a previous life I was a technical writer for mechanical assemblies, so when I get my 48x48 pro kit in the next few months I'll document the build process and host it somewhere where it won't disappear., as happens sometimes here.

You would think a company that sells kit(s) that require assembling as their main product(s), and who sell as many as they seem to do, would be able to hire a technical writer to author, or at least edit and help flesh out, their documentation. Seems like Business 101 to me.

And in their defence nowhere on their site do they mention the 12h assembly thing as far as I can find, and the only mention of assembly time is for the prewired Nema34 kits (6h for their experienced team) and the benchtoo machine. (Easy assembly/3-5h). So I would guess either they never mentioned 12h and it's BS, or whoever said it spoke out of turn and needs to be corrected.

ahren
08-10-2014, 01:09 PM
I never want to see anyone have a bad experience with one of our machine kits, and this one certainly took me and the rest of my team by surprise. We strive to make sure there is always someone available to help out with questions or issues that may arise during a machine build so that no one has to struggle.

The exploded view drawings and related documentation for the Standard line hasn't changed much in over a year. Up until now, we haven't had any major issues with it, and have been able to quickly resolve specific questions over the phone or email.

However it is clear that in the years since we introduced our Standard CNC machine line, the DIY community has changed and evolved quite a bit, with many newer and less experienced builders entering the market, so there are certainly some areas of our documentation that we can, and should, revisit. We have already taken this to heart with some of our newer machine kits, which include much more step-by-step instructions, and we should take the some approach for updated documentation for the Standard line as well.

In regards to build time, we haven't received much feedback other than the occasional "Machine went together great, built it all this weekend!", but this may not be the case for newer builders, and will vary greatly depending on the specifics of the build (size and style of machine, accessories, base, etc.) and the user building it.

Deni, I'll just close in saying I'm sincerely sorry we were unable to meet your expectations, and I wish you the best of luck in your new machine venture.

Ahren
CNCRouterParts (http://www.cncrouterparts.com)

BuckNaked31
08-10-2014, 11:56 PM
There are hours and hours of machine build on YouTube, some are very long and thorough.

Sent from my LGMS769 using Tapatalk 2

Frankmali17
08-18-2014, 10:50 PM
Just want to post my 2 cents here...
First You get out of it, what you put into it.... First Golder Rule.... I am in the cabinetry business... and I hear people all the time complaining about how something is not up to par... but how the work they want me to do is a piece of cake.... One thing I learned is good things take time...
In building a machine or kit... not only your experience and knowledge is critical... but also the complexity of the other components you want to implement.
My first CNC is mostly wood based, with metal rails/vbearings/and other parts... I am a meticulous son of a gun... but the fussiness and time I put in step by step to make each part as fine tunned as I can, is only an investment... It makes the work I produce with the machine only that much more accurate and precise....
The Original Poster sounds disappointed because he sounds like he want's to "bang it out" and have results without paying his dues...
Patience is not only required for the machine...but then will come the software, and experience, and learning from mistakes....