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View Full Version : Build a cheap, SIMPLE, CnC foam cutter.



moreil
06-22-2006, 12:02 AM
I've just started building my CNC foam cutter.

Step-by-step progress is being recorded at http://www.homecnc.org/index.php/Cheap_Foam_Cutter

My objective here is to build a fairly cheap machine that's buildable with the tools I have (meaning, no drill press, no lathe :) )

Hopefully, the page above will be useable as a step-by-step guide for easily building a cutter.

My background is in software, so this real world stuff is a bit of novelty at the moment :)

I have all the electronics, and have cut the wood so the next step is to start assembly....

My cost to date is around $USD330, most of which is the stepper controller board.

Many pictures at the wiki page above.

moreil
06-23-2006, 02:31 AM
Fully finished building one frame (didn't have enough Al tubing to do the other one end).

Now just need to add the motors and it will be working! yay!

http://www.homecnc.org/images/4/42/Med-2006-06-23-IMG_9682.JPG

moreil
06-23-2006, 03:24 AM
dup

moreil
06-23-2006, 04:26 AM
My M8 threaded rod is galvanised (or corroded). Which makes it too thick for my M8 nuts.

I started re-threaded it with a hand die, but it's hard going (it's removing quite a bit of metal) and the thought of re-threading 2000mm of rod isn't much fun.

Anyone know of a good supplier of metalwork materials in Sydney, Australia? That's open on a saturday morning...?

fkaCarel
06-23-2006, 05:14 AM
Try stainless rod (304). Cost a little more, but there is no galvanising, nor will there be corrosion.

Carel

moreil
06-23-2006, 05:30 AM
Sounds like a good idea. I've found a metal supplier that's open on a saturday, so here's hoping they've got M8 threaded rod.

I'm currently using 12mm Al tubing for the rails. I think I might replace that with 12mm stainless steel if I can. (Assuming that the metal suppler will cut it for me. No way am I going to try cutting stainless steel by hand :)

fkaCarel
06-23-2006, 05:46 AM
The problems in handling stainless are a little overrated. You get used to it. The keywords are tools and patience (as in work progress is not linear with adrenaline level) ;)

Carel

moreil
06-23-2006, 07:16 AM
What would you normally use to cut it? I'm assuming a hacksaw isn't going to do the trick. Would a cutoff wheel from a dremal make any impact? I suspect an angle grinder would do something but that's probably overkill. :)

fkaCarel
06-23-2006, 07:34 AM
A hacksaw for metal does the trick. Use a quality sawblade from your local industrial supplier. A consumer hardware store only sells tools that have the appearance of tools. Think off the bits they sell for electric screwdriving. If you look very carefully you see them disintegrate if they come within a distance of 5cm of the screw they have to drive;)

Carel

moreil
06-24-2006, 12:14 AM
We went out this morning, in principle to meet a friend for breakfast. We 'accidently' detoured along the way to go to Edcon Steel in brookvale.

Very nice shop! I bought 4 meters of 12mm stainless steel rod. They nicely used their electric hacksaw to cut it into 500mm lengths. They directed me next door to another place to buy the 1000mm stainless steel threaded 8mm rod. Total cost was about $AUD65 which I thought reasonable.

The 12mm stainless steel is unsuprisingly much heavier than the Al tubing, but it's incredibly stiff. I can visibly bend the Al tubing in my hands, but I can't make a dent on the steel rod. It's also got a better surface than the Aluminium tubing (smoother and harder).

I spent a couple of hours putting the other frame together, and then added threaded rod and motors to be first one.

Just connected it up to the computer and yay! it moves!

Moves very nicely actually. No missed steps on the motor, silent and smooth. There's no detectable lash that I can see, but I'll need to measure that properly later on.

Am feeling very chuffed with myself at the moment. :)

moreil
06-24-2006, 12:55 AM
I've extensively updated the step-by-step guide at http://www.homecnc.org/index.php/Cheap_Foam_Cutter with more photos. I've also move the bulk of the photos off into sub-pages so it isn't quite so bad to load (previously, it was loading more than 4 megabytes of pictures :)

fkaCarel
06-24-2006, 04:36 AM
Congratulations! I know the feeling when an effort turns into a result. Bath in it and have a beer. Were you able to totally avoid sawing?

Carel

moreil
06-24-2006, 05:31 AM
Were you able to totally avoid sawing?

Carel


Yup! I used the circular saw to cut the pieces initially, and then only did some minor sanding with the dremal later on. No hand sawing anywhere!

I used the dremal with a cutoff wheel to cut the stainless steel threaded rod (only 8mm diameter). The steel shop cut the 12mm for me to my specs.

diarmaid
06-24-2006, 07:16 AM
That looks very nice. But Im not sure where the foam goes!!
1) Are you using a heated wire to cut, if so where does the other end of the wire attach to and what holds the foam in place and where?
2)What will you be using to heat the wire and what type of wire?
3)If not wire, what are you cutting with and where does it mount and how?

Maybe its just me... :o

Edit: Ok, it must be just me, I looked again and thought the diagram might show something but no cigar. How does this work?

moreil
06-24-2006, 07:42 AM
Sorry, the photos just show the one frame. There's an identical one that's also built. They're clamped to either end of a table and the heated wire strung between them (attached to the 8A and 8B pieces). The foam is placed inbetween them to be cut.

I'll post a photo of it cutting when I get the hot wire sorted out.

diarmaid
06-24-2006, 07:44 AM
Ahhh...the penny drops!...thanks. I look forward to the photos. Nice job. :)

moreil
06-25-2006, 05:51 AM
As previously mentioned, here's a shot of the two frames fully assembled with motors fitted.

http://www.homecnc.org/images/thumb/2/20/Med-2006-06-25-IMG_9709.JPG/384px-Med-2006-06-25-IMG_9709.JPG

I still need to run the permanent cabling for the motors and fit the ballbearings for the hot wire to run over. (Slowed down a bit today: other commitments).

diarmaid
06-25-2006, 07:26 AM
Is that HDF (Hardboard for u yanks ;) ) that you built from, or is it hardwood and I just cant see the grain in the photo?

moreil
06-25-2006, 07:35 AM
I know it as 16mm MDF or Medium Density Fibreboard. (About 5/8ths of an inch thick I think in stone age measures :) )

It's plenty strong enough. I was expecting to have to butress the joined between the 6A and 5A pieces, but not required.

moreil
06-26-2006, 03:02 AM
I did all the wiring this morning. A very tedious job! It's all fully wired up now and I've been playing with using Foamworks to cut imaginary cores!

http://www.homecnc.org/images/thumb/6/61/Med-2006-06-26-IMG_9721.JPG/384px-Med-2006-06-26-IMG_9721.JPG

Next step is to hook up the hot wire and get it hot. I've currently got some 12 ohms per meter nichrome wire that I was going to use. Any advise from anyone here? Can I just hook this up to a 12V power supply? Will 1 amp heat it up enough?

(web page updated with more photos as normal).

vulcom1
06-26-2006, 01:24 PM
Interesting reading as I have been gathering the parts to make my own. I have been cutting by hand for years and I don't think 1 amp will be enough. My older homemade cutter was 4 amps 24 volts and was a bit weak over 40 inch's. The power supply I have now is 24 volt 8 amps with a dimmer on the 110 side. Lots of power for the long wings I cut.
I have been using Sullivan control line cable (.015) for quite a few years. I found using nichrome broke on me at the wrong time. You can experiment with the wire as I know some use the braided control line wire or stainless steel and some use piano wire. The piano wire breaks on me to so I stay with the .015. If you get the cable for control line you almost have a life time supply.
Hope this is some help and keep us up to date as it looks very good from this end.
John

diarmaid
06-26-2006, 04:42 PM
Why not just use some scrap foam and increase 1amp per cut to see what works best. Shouldn't take too long and you can try different wire types the same way when you have free time. :)

unterhaus
06-27-2006, 01:36 AM
google puts up lots of links for Foamworks. You have a link? this is a very inspiring thread.

moreil
06-27-2006, 03:56 AM
I cut foam today! Yay!

Big success on that front. The result wasn't the best though.

http://www.homecnc.org/images/thumb/5/5d/Med-2006-06-27-IMG_9779.JPG/384px-Med-2006-06-27-IMG_9779.JPG

Machine all setup ready to cut.
http://www.homecnc.org/images/thumb/6/69/Med-2006-06-27-IMG_9840.JPG/192px-Med-2006-06-27-IMG_9840.JPG

Cutting! Yay!

http://www.homecnc.org/images/thumb/0/0d/Med-2006-06-27-IMG_9854.JPG/192px-Med-2006-06-27-IMG_9854.JPG

Problem. This is reasonably typical: The thin end of the wing part ends up all melted.

I'm using 0.5mm stainless steel leader for a cutting wire.

Settings I tried:

1mm/second cut rate, 1.0 amps of current, 0.5mm kerf (best)
0.2mm/sec, 1.0 amps, 0.5mm kerf (worst).
0.4mm/sec, 0.9 amps, 0.5mm kerf.
1.2mm/sec, 1.26 amps, 1mm kerf.
2mm/sec, 1.32 amps, 1 mm kerf.

All sucked reasonably badly. The best result was the first, but it was clearly dragging the wire through the foam (the middle of the wire was about 3 second behind the ends of the wire coming out of the foam).

(more pics at http://www.homecnc.org/index.php/Cheap_Foam_Cutter as normal).

fkaCarel
06-27-2006, 04:48 AM
First a couple of observations:

I think a rocking chair would be better in cooling the wire which is not cooled by the foam. Using a book called "Sewing and Knitting" to press, will confuse the foam to its psychic limit. I would advice 500 copies of "No matter what, this will work".:)

I don't know anything about foam cutting, but it looks like finding the right material for the wire and the thickness thereoff, speed and temperature is a knowledge.
You may even find the need for regulation, as conductivity is Kelvin related.

Carel

moreil
06-27-2006, 05:22 AM
First a couple of observations:

I think a rocking chair would be better in cooling the wire which is not cooled by the foam. Using a book called "Sewing and Knitting" to press, will confuse the foam to its psychic limit. I would advice 500 copies of "No matter what, this will work".:)


This made me laugh out loud!

I would have used the 'Common LISP Reference' but 'Sewing and Knitting' was apparently a weightier subject. :)

vulcom1
06-27-2006, 12:28 PM
Looks good and you are having success and now it is a matter of adjustment. I was wondering where your wire is attached. The comment about tension holds true as even by hand it is a problem. I have seen some instead of the wire being connected to the uprights they use a bow resting on the pins. Then it does not distort anything and gives better cuts. The bow is supported by the uprights so it does not fall but it is still free to move. Your comment on drag at the centre and there should not be makes me think you are not hot enough or going to fast. The yahoo foam site has a lot of comments on this as the wire should not be touching the foam.
Keep us posted as it keeps us guy's interested.
John

diarmaid
06-27-2006, 12:36 PM
...as the wire should not be touching the foam.
Please elaborate?

vulcom1
06-27-2006, 03:12 PM
The ideal cut is that your heat and speed are set right that the foam melts without the wire touching the foam.If you are too low on heat the wire drags and the same as to fast for speed. This is why you get the lines on the cut and it usually is vibration from the wire being under tension. As mentioned most use a bow on this setup so you can maintain a good tension. Along with the bow I use a 1/2" spring about 1.5" long on the wire. With the spring stretched a bit the wire has room to expand when heated. This will also get rid of some of your problems as it keeps the tension. The spring wire is about 1/16" in diameter so it is quite strong.
Going to be gone for a couple of days so may not be able to answer for a bit. Keep experimenting with the scraps and also mark down your settings. Going to have to start on mine sooner than later as you have me interested again.
John

moreil
06-27-2006, 04:15 PM
google puts up lots of links for Foamworks. You have a link? this is a very inspiring thread.


http://www.foamwork.net

moreil
06-28-2006, 12:22 AM
I just cut what looks like a fairly credible foam blank. Some suprises.

1. The foam has impurities. Occasional little particules that looks like sand grains. When the wire catches on it, it produces a bit ripple.

2. I've giving up on the radiant cutting. I just can't get it to work right. In particular, if the wire is cool enough to cut the foam in the center, then it's way too cool at the edges (where the wire is being cooled by the air). And if it's hot enough at the edge, it produces big cavities in the center from the heatr build up.

3. Foamworks sucks on windows xp. Even setting the process priority to 'realtime' can't get it to run the motors smoothly. Every time a background process wake up, the motors hiccup. (and windows xp has a LOT of background processes). In fact, just moving the mouse makes the motors hiccup. which in term makes ripples in the foam.

I'd like to try GMFC, but it's requires a 2KHz pulse train IN on pin 10 (which obviously the xylotex board doesn't produce). I'll try programming an ATtiny13 microcontroller i've got lying around to produce the pulse train; we'll see how that goes.

This will also allow driving the motors at 1/8th steps (instead of 1/2 steps) so allowing a much smoother movement.

4. I just can't get radiant cutting to work. My best effort was running a fast hot wire, rather than a slow cool wire. I'm currently running 2.8mm/sec at 1.44 amps to produce quite good looking cores.

moreil
06-28-2006, 07:17 AM
I've just installed GMFC (as a replacement for the Foamworks cutting software) and it's chalk and cheese!

The GMFC software is a real pain to get running. It need a 2KHz - 4KHz pulse train input to the parallel port, so I spent some time mucking around programming a ATtiny13 CPU I had handy to generate a 3KHz pulse sequence. After much mucking around getting an interrupt on the parallel port on my ancient laptop, it was finally up and running.

And wow, it's a HUGE improvement. The GMFC software is much more flexable, it's scriptable, and it's drives the motors very smoothly. Running the motor steps of the interrupt handling is a big big improvement. I'm now 1/4th stepping the motors (up from 1/2 stepping) and I can run the motors very smoothly at 3.5mm/sec. I haven't cut any foam with it yet; Hopefully I'll get a chance to do that tomorrow.

diarmaid
06-28-2006, 09:39 AM
Seems like your moving along steadily and ironing out the problems as they arise. Keep up the good work! This is very interesting. Good job. :)

moreil
06-28-2006, 09:33 PM
Success!!

http://www.homecnc.org/images/0/0e/Med-2006-06-29-IMG_9919.JPG

This is a beautifully smooth core, just very slightly undersize (my kerf setting was a little small).

With many thanks to the advice from Graham, I elected to go much hotter and a bit faster. I'm now cutting at ~ 1.7 amps at an average 3.7mm/sec (peaking at 5.5mm/sec).

Entertainingly, at this heat, the wire doesn't appear to touch the foam. There's no dragging of the wire at all that I can see. The leading edge is very fractionally not straight: It curves off slightly at the small end, but I think that's more due to the incorrect kerf setting causing too much meltback.

BTW: Earlier I mentioned using a constant current source. My apologies for the utter nonsense.

What we really want is a constant heat wire (I think). The wire resistance increases as the temperature goes up. Power is V*I or V*V/R or I*I*R. Ideally we want to increase the voltage slightly as the resistance goes down.

Now lets look what happens with a constant current source . When the wire touches the (cold) foam and drops in temperature, the resistance reduces and the current source drops the voltage so as to hold the current constant. The disipated power drops just when we want it to increase. Oops.

With a constant voltage source, when the wire gets cooler, the resistance drops, and the current increases, increasing the power slightly. Much better!

In an ideal world, what we'd actually want to do is measure the resistance (as a proxy for temperature) and vary the voltage/current to suit.

Either way, a voltage source is a better idea than a current source.

Not 100% sure that this makes a difference in practice! :)

fkaCarel
06-29-2006, 05:24 AM
Congratulations on your success! You are driving the fast lane. Earlier I mentioned Kelvin. It kept nagging me, I learned it, but forgotten the details. I found it here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrical_resistivity

You see that NiChrome jumps out in stable thermal resistance, up and about a 10 fold over the next one. So it generates the same heat, almost unrelated to the cooling, but of course, to make the problem circular, with the accompanying temperature loss. And obtainability has an inverse linearity to suitability. I assume you already know this, this is just to bore other people ;)

Carel

moreil
07-01-2006, 01:14 AM
I've now got a full set of SG-II wing cores. I think! I've never seen the real thing so I'm hoping these are credible.

I'm now running GMFC, at 3.5mm/sec cutting speed, running 25V over a 900mm bow (around 1.65 amps), with a 1.5mm kerf at full speed and 2.5mm kerf at half speed.

It took a lot of experimenting, but I think these are fairly reproduceable now.

Something that did bite me though was the need for more heat when cutting larger pieces of foam. Cutting the wingtip (foam is 300mm wide) needs about 6% less current than cutting the wing (600mm wide). I ruined a set of large cores trying to cut them at the same heat as the smaller cores. The wire dragged and produced lots of hair and messiness.

I'm now radiant cutting by the way: The resulting cores have no hair on them at all.

All in all, I'm feeling pretty happy about the results. Now lets see if they're any use to bag.. :)

diarmaid
07-01-2006, 06:56 AM
Post a pic of the fully finished article.....maybe even in flight! :)

moreil
07-05-2006, 08:40 PM
I've updated http://www.homecnc.org/index.php/Cheap_Foam_Cutter with a couple of photos of the machine in operation.

http://www.homecnc.org/images/thumb/3/3c/2006-07-05-IMG_9959-eq.JPG/512px-2006-07-05-IMG_9959-eq.JPG

fyffe555
07-06-2006, 10:41 AM
Moreil, nice job! A couple of suggestions from the old days of cutting these by hand, you've probably figured thsi out already but;

A spring tensioner for the cutting wire might just be causing some of the problems you had on longer parts. Wire changes length with heat and a spring isn't always linear in its tension so the tension on the wire could change. That could cause ripples and similar effects like you had doing the diamond cuts. We used to use weights as gravity is always (usually) consistant. Problem then is you have to work out how much weight to use...

Foam is basically two grades, virgin foam is straight from the factory, new raw materials, no recycled content. Is very consistant in structure and density and doesn't produce unexpected results. Ordinary foam such as used in construction insulation includes a proportion of recycled material and has a variable structure and density and so cuts irregularly.

Again, nice job, you've some really nice results there, how are you going to finish them?

Andrew

vulcom1
07-06-2006, 02:34 PM
Got home and nice to see the progress. Looks like very good cores from the blue foam as it was mentioned being harder to cut. As I mentioned the spring on the wire, it is possible it could be not strong enough on the long wire due to expansion but the longest bow I have is 48".
I have gathered up all the piece's(electronic's) for the mm2001 board which is supposed to work with the gmfc software. I hope this is true as making the board will be okay but the software could be a problem. Guess this is what the DIY is all about.
Just have to get my model finished before starting but in the process of trying to get a electronic ignition also made fot the gas burner.
Keep us posted how you are making out as it will help all of us.
John

diarmaid
07-06-2006, 05:47 PM
moreil,
Looking great, just a quick question :).
How are you feeling now about your design re. the two seperate parts and clamping them individually. Do you think it was a good idea and is helping you by having some flexibility in the setup, or do you think you should have built a more ridgid one piece machine with two attached moving sections? Thanks.

txcowdog
12-09-2006, 02:04 AM
Excellent build. Thanks for keeping us updated with your trial and error.

lerman
12-10-2006, 02:15 PM
Success!!

Stuff deleted....

BTW: Earlier I mentioned using a constant current source. My apologies for the utter nonsense.

What we really want is a constant heat wire (I think). The wire resistance increases as the temperature goes up. Power is V*I or V*V/R or I*I*R. Ideally we want to increase the voltage slightly as the resistance goes down.

Now lets look what happens with a constant current source . When the wire touches the (cold) foam and drops in temperature, the resistance reduces and the current source drops the voltage so as to hold the current constant. The disipated power drops just when we want it to increase. Oops.

With a constant voltage source, when the wire gets cooler, the resistance drops, and the current increases, increasing the power slightly. Much better!

In an ideal world, what we'd actually want to do is measure the resistance (as a proxy for temperature) and vary the voltage/current to suit.

Either way, a voltage source is a better idea than a current source.

Not 100% sure that this makes a difference in practice! :)

By using an op amp and a bridge circuit, you can implement a driver that will keep the temperature constant (more precisely, will keep the resistance constant).

Ken

the_canuck
01-26-2007, 06:34 PM
Nice looking machine. I have built myself one and now use it in production. I use an older version of GFMC and am running 80lb stainless wire and a 9 foot bow. My table is excessively big. Anyone need IMAC wings? :D

I've been cutting for a couple years with my machine now.

Here's a few things I learned that you may want to experiment with.

1. To help the LE curl problem with super thin airfoils play around with the GFMC LE cut schemes. It makes a much better LE than just bringing the wire around the LE. It also gives you a small window for the wire to catch up if it has started to drag and may save the core. I've cutt 55mm long cores with less than 30mm cords with my big machine and have gotten good results. Think 30" Apogee tails. On my version of GFMC you can't change the heat in the middle of the cut.

2. On using aligator clips on the wire: I tried that but ran into the problem of the wire catching on something and messing up the core. I now clip my aligators to the wire holder and not the wire itself.

3. Cutting foam over 40psi gets progressively more annoying. The more dense the stuff is the higher temps you need to run and even then you can run into weird oscillation problems if the wire even thinks of dragging. It will make a nice wavy core with progressively bigger waves. The longer your bow is the worse the problem is.

4. I'm using Malin hard stainless 80lb test wire for cutting. I too have noticed the wire outside the foam gets much hotter. This is only a problem when you run the wire to almost red hot which I do for EPP. It causes the wire to oxidize and also stretch. I get 15 cores out of EPP if I'm lucky before the wire breaks. I try to catch this and change the wire before it breaks mid cut and ruins the core. I think if you can run lower temps this won't happen as often. I know I can cut about 10x more EPS cores before I have wire problems.

5. Always good to clean the wire between cuts. This may be the source of the little hard bits you are thinking is from the foam itself. You can clean the wire by running a scrap piece of foam over the wire when its hot. Especially important when cutting epp as the wire will build up with ash and eventually cause the wire to drag. I think the ash insulates the wire and keeps the heat from melting the foam correctly.

I also have picked up a few feet of some more exotic alloy wires but have yet to test them. Rene and Inconel are two I remember off the top of my head. I'm hoping to find something that survives better than stainless cutting EPP. I've tried Nichrome a few times and really don't like the stuff. It's too brittle, stretches with heat way too much for my big bow, and kinks easily making the wire useless for cutting.

There photos of my machine, electronics, and setup in the gallery on my website.

Next on my list is a CNC Milling machine!

Andrew
www.canuckengineering.com

venomx999
02-12-2007, 04:47 AM
Anyone tried using Mach software to cut ?

edoggy
09-25-2008, 12:36 AM
Hi, Can anyone post the pictures of the Hot Wire Cutter on this forum since the "http://www.homecnc.org/index.php/Cheap_Foam_Cutter" site is down.
I am interseted in making my own Hot Wire Cutter (not expensive type!) Does anybody have plans?
Thanks,

gandalf1
09-25-2008, 03:08 AM
I have used my table top router for cutting small foam patterns,
Luckily my needs are simple so a solid shape is all that ?I need. I used the basic software I normally emply when cutting assorted shapes from plastic, wood or metal but found I needed to swap the Z and Y axis over. A simple drawing is produced but great care is needed to ensure the wire goes around the shap and does not take a 'short cut' across the foam and also found it best to start along the upper surface of the foam and cut the lower level last before ending up back at the starting position.
The foam is stuck to the machine with double side tape and it is interesting to watch the wire rising and falling as it passes through the foam unlike conventional routing where the cutter moves across the table. I appreciate I only make small patterns and can only accommodate foam blocks some 2 inches thick by 6 inches wide by 9 inches long but it works.
The bow is made from what in UK are called 'Junior Hacksaws' in my case from the Pound Shop, the wire is fixed one end into an insulating block with a screw that also forms one of the power lead connections and the other has a spring to keep the wire tight with the other power lead being connected to the metal saw frame. It as I said works fine for my small patterns with the power being supplied by a model railwat transformer/rectifier which is controlled by a normal lamp dimmer so as to keep the voltage down to about 2 or 3 volts.
I would however like to 'rout' the foam using a vertical 'cutter' and have modified a small soldering iron to fit the machine in place of the normal rotary spindle. The modification consisted of drilling a hole into the copper bit and inserting a brass wire 1.5 mm diameter and some 30 mm long. Great idea except for the temperature gradient along this wire prevents cutting to any depth so any thoughts on how to create a constant temperature 'tip' no more than 1.5 mm diameter would be gratefully read.
Until I solve that problem my wheel patterns will continue to be routed out of the high density foam with a small slot drill which of course limits the depth of cut to about 10 mm or so.
John (in UK)

blackbeard52
09-25-2008, 05:50 AM
Can anyone post the pictures of the Hot Wire Cutter on this forum since the "http://www.homecnc.org/index.php/Cheap_Foam_Cutter" site is down.

Dont remember but I think this one is simular....as long as you are not cutting 4x8 blocks.... enjoy

http://www.instructables.com/id/Make-a-CNC-Hot-Wire-Foam-Cutter-from-parts-availab/

Bob

bkboggy
11-25-2008, 12:40 AM
So the link is not working.... Can you get it back up?

dsquire
11-25-2008, 12:57 AM
So the link is not working.... Can you get it back up?

Which link isn't working???

Don

bkboggy
12-08-2008, 12:50 AM
http://www.homecnc.org/index.php/Cheap_Foam_Cutter link is not working....

hacksaw44
01-04-2009, 09:09 PM
I would like to see the one from the first post also.The_canuck,have you got a build thread on here also?