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ssw
01-18-2014, 02:06 AM
Hello All,

Still missing a few pieces, but have enough to get the major hardware together. Went with the NEMA 34's and plan put together my own control box.

This is my second machine build. The first was a complete DIY job, plywood structure with skate bearings running on water pipe. Needless to say I learned a lot!

My base is aluminum extrusion, 1.5" x 3.0". Outside perimeter of 49.0" x 63.0". 32.0" high will make the spoil board right about 36.0", standard counter height.
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-- Bernie

groc426
01-18-2014, 10:58 AM
That extrusion table looks really sharp!

rwskinner
01-19-2014, 12:33 AM
Looking Good!

ssw
01-28-2014, 12:06 PM
All,

Well, the build is going great!

Bumped in to a few snags, but managed to work things out myself so far. Got behind posting to this build log, but I'll do my best to catch up and document the adventure.

...So if you look at the previous photos you can see that the floor my shop area in the garage has 2 steps up. Everything looked like it would fit next to the workbench, but I forgot to consider space for the gantry motors and cable management. The attached pics show my solution. The wood blocks are solid top to bottom, so should have no issue with machine weight. It just looks funny. :)
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ssw
01-28-2014, 12:10 PM
Base frame leveled and squared.

Machine base attached with slotted "L" brackets.
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ssw
01-28-2014, 12:16 PM
Installed steel bearing rails and gantry components. I used the bar clamp suggestion. worked pretty good, although I did go back and tweak a few of the connection blocks after I found that the bearings rolled easier in some parts of the rail.

Here is a tip: I was not seating the steel into the blocks better. That was already bottomed out. What I found was that the block itself could be moved slightly as it attaches to the extrusion. That straightened things out!
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ssw
01-28-2014, 12:26 PM
Motors installed!
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And I found an old PC carcass to use for my DIY electronics!
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ssw
01-28-2014, 12:31 PM
Mounted components to a 0.090 thick aluminum plate.Mounted that plate to the old PC mother board stand-offs in the tower case.
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ssw
01-28-2014, 12:40 PM
Still waiting for the proximity sensors to arrive. Found a refurbed Dell tower/Win7 computer at Micro Center WITH WARRANTY for $120.00!!!

In the meantime I just had to wire things up and try it out!

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IT WORKS!!!

CRP
01-28-2014, 02:32 PM
Hi Bernie,

Your build is looking great! Nice work.


Cory

ssw
01-28-2014, 06:27 PM
Cory,

Thanks!

groc426
01-28-2014, 08:51 PM
Wow you've made a lot of progress. I agree with Cory, its looking really good! Is it just me or are some of the attachments not working?

ssw
01-28-2014, 09:27 PM
Thanks Guys!

Hey, does anybody know why some of my photo attachments are not showing up properly? They were all shot with same camera.

Thanks.

rwskinner
01-28-2014, 10:13 PM
I'm not sure, but I had this happen as well on the "Insert Picture" but if I used "Attachments" then it worked fine. I'm not sure if that is the problem with yours or not but it was doing that to me a few days ago.

Richard

ssw
01-29-2014, 02:45 PM
Thanks Richard.

I think my image files were too big.

Here are some of my missing attachments:
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ssw
01-29-2014, 02:48 PM
Oh and here is a quick video of the first moves!

(YouTube offered to "fix" my shaky video. NOW it's a WARPED video. THANKS!)


http://youtu.be/1zeZYu0y2Lo

rwskinner
01-29-2014, 02:49 PM
Sweet looking machine and stand!

Richard

ssw
01-29-2014, 05:28 PM
My local Menard's store has precision pre-cut MDF in 4 x 4, 2 x 4, and 2 x 2 ft. sheets. Perfect!

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ssw
01-29-2014, 06:24 PM
Cable management installed. When this 12" Z is all the way up, it barely makes it, but it does.

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FoxCNC1
02-03-2014, 12:24 AM
Base frame leveled and squared.

Machine base attached with slotted "L" brackets.
220798220800

I like your base, how are those legs 40-4080 ? working out for you?
I was going to go 40-8080 until I saw this.

ssw
02-03-2014, 04:36 PM
I like your base, how are those legs 40-4080 ? working out for you?
I was going to go 40-8080 until I saw this.

My machine base legs look like 4080, but they are actually 1.5" x 3.0". Short story: I was able to get a deal on extrusions from a friend, but he only deals in standard, not metric. I had the choice of going with the 3.0" x 3.0". At the time all I was thinking about was weight not wiggle. I think if I were to do it again I'd go with a bigger profile. This past weekend I added some 1.5" x 1.5" gussets at 45 deg. in the upper corners and has helped a lot with the wiggle.

Another option to consider if building a light frame would be to "sheet" (plywood, ABS, etc.) the sides. I think that would really lock it up solid.

-- Bernie

FoxCNC1
02-03-2014, 05:49 PM
yeah that is what I was thinking you needed, and you can even put your vac under it.
Thank you for your honest response. I will continue to look at the 8080 then - I don't think I want my machine to be too tall. I would like it at about 18-20" from FF.

vtx1029
02-04-2014, 01:15 PM
I used 3x3 extrusion for legs on my router. No worries there.

ssw
02-10-2014, 11:15 AM
It's very cool having a machine make it's own parts!

Holes and counter bores for the spoil board and end caps for the 80/160 extrusions. If anybody wants to cut some end caps, I can post the 2D files.

-- Bernie

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rwskinner
02-10-2014, 11:30 AM
Looks great. I too planned on cutting end caps for the 8020, but mine are different than yours. Which material did you use, looks cool.

Richard

FoxCNC1
02-10-2014, 11:55 AM
yeah very cool.

I never thought of end caps, but yes it keeps the dust out of the extrusions specially the risers.

ssw
02-10-2014, 03:06 PM
The end caps are cut from 6mm ABS. Same stuff I used for my lower shelf under the machine.


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FoxCNC1
02-10-2014, 03:33 PM
cool !

FoxCNC1
02-10-2014, 09:23 PM
Bernie, how do you code the Counter bore?
what software are you using?

ssw
02-11-2014, 12:17 AM
Within Rhino, I use RhinoCAM from MecSoft. VisualCAM is the stand alone version. It has a machining method called Projection Pocketing. I built a 3D model of the beveled holes to match the M8 flat head bolts. It then used the 3D surface to determine the bottom of the pocket. By choosing a shallow depth of cut, it calculated several passes, giving a very fine step down.


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ssw
02-16-2014, 01:28 PM
More progress!

Installed the Mach3 2010 Screenset from ger21, and fabricated some hardware. After first tests, things are working great!

Touch plate mount: 3/4 plywood + 3/4 aluminum square = my spoil board thickness.

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rwskinner
02-16-2014, 02:31 PM
Just be careful when you surface your spoil board so that you don't get into your plate. As easy as yours is to remove it might be easier to just remove it before surfacing.
Mine is very close to the spoil board as well and afterwards I thought about it and should made it much lower so there is no chance in a collision.

Richard

ger21
02-16-2014, 03:17 PM
Just be careful if you make it lower than the spoilboard, and using large diameter bits, that the bits don't catch the spoilboard on the way down.

Very nice, clean build you have there.

FoxCNC1
02-16-2014, 03:19 PM
Some good advice indeed from these guys

tinygiants
02-16-2014, 04:06 PM
I do not yet have a machine, so maybe I am off base. Would not a zero reference from a fixed point be off as soon as you surface the spoil board? I would think a floating zero reference would allow for continuously changing spoil board.


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FoxCNC1
02-16-2014, 04:12 PM
I do not yet have a machine, so maybe I am off base. Would not a zero reference from a fixed point be off as soon as you surface the spoil board? I would think a floating zero reference would allow for continuously changing spoil board.


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You zero the machine every time after you cut or change bits. Also with the script, the Z will move down UNTIL it touches the touch off plate and that before your zero.
Hope it makes sense. but not its not a concern at all. Definitely a tool to have, I was missing out with me previous machine.

BanduraMaker
02-16-2014, 04:13 PM
so maybe I am off base. \

Yes, you're off base. When using a 2 plate method, the first probe is to work zero, and then a second probe is done to find the difference between the work zero and the fixed plate. All the measurements are relative so it doesn't matter where they are so long as they're consistent during the job.

tinygiants
02-16-2014, 09:38 PM
So the zero is not equal to the spoil board (if spoil board has been surfaced multiple times)? How is that a good starting point? I understand how zero off the top of work piece works. I even understand zero off the spoil board works.


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jm82792
02-16-2014, 09:52 PM
Zero is usually the top or the bottom of the stock you're cutting.
Also if you have homing switches zero is usually where the axis contact homing switches, and then you use an offset to where the zero is for the piece in question. Then you can have multiple fixtures on one machine :)

rwskinner
02-16-2014, 10:04 PM
The reason for two plates is so you only have to zero the first bit to the work piece with the movable plate. Once that is done, the bit is touched off on the fixed plate and the difference is stored. It has nothing to do with the spoil board height at all.

The next time a tool change is called for in the G-Code, the bit is changed and you press Cycle Start then the bit is touched off the fixed plate and now the new bit length is known.

The entire concept of the dual plates is so you do not have to touch each bit off on the work piece which is very handy especially if your original surface has been machined away.

The fixed plate can change heights if needed during spoil board surfacing or whatever, it just can't change after you start a job and reference the first bit.

I hope I explained it well.

Richard

tinygiants
02-16-2014, 10:35 PM
The reason for two plates is so you only have to zero the first bit to the work piece with the movable plate. Once that is done, the bit is touched off on the fixed plate and the difference is stored. It has nothing to do with the spoil board height at all.

The next time a tool change is called for in the G-Code, the bit is changed and you press Cycle Start then the bit is touched off the fixed plate and now the new bit length is known.

The entire concept of the dual plates is so you do not have to touch each bit off on the work piece which is very handy especially if your original surface has been machined away.

The fixed plate can change heights if needed during spoil board surfacing or whatever, it just can't change after you start a job and reference the first bit.

I hope I explained it well.

Richard
That helps alot. Thank You. I was stuck on the fact that the spoil board would change.

FoxCNC1
02-16-2014, 10:48 PM
oh cool, I too learned something new.

ssw
02-21-2014, 12:32 PM
Thanks everyone for that quick little discussion. Sometimes even the simplest stuff can be confusing.


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ssw
02-21-2014, 12:37 PM
During the last few days I've managed to get my control box panels designed and cut, assembled, and back in working order. Also did some much needed wire management.
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Frankmali17
02-23-2014, 08:19 PM
Hello SSW....I assume you got the proximity sensors from CNC R P. I was curious about your opinion of these...
About how far away do they begin to sense? and how consistent do you feel these work? I use microswitches with a little lever arm... seems to work well... but I was wondering if the proximity sensors would be more accurate and repeatable.

THanks
Awesome machine by the way...

ssw
02-23-2014, 08:32 PM
Yes sensors are CRP. It appears to sense about 8mm. Very consistent. One feature alone that makes these nice is the ease in which they can be adjusted. The threads are quite fine so they can be micro-adjusted. When using these on a master/slave setup, squaring the gantry involves very little trial and error. I simply measure the gap, screw the sensor in or out the distance I want to move the gantry, re-home. Done.


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rwskinner
02-24-2014, 02:59 PM
I agree that my CRP Homing/Limits sensors work very well also.

Richard