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View Full Version : DLI 4896 (What is it worth)?



c.fehringer
10-01-2012, 03:51 AM
Looking at a cnc at a local auction, invoice says dli4896dst (DynaCNC 4x8'). (Attached images)

It was upgraded to servos from steppers, gecko drives. I believe the initial invoice came out to around 13k. It includes a steel plasma bed and also a router/woodworking deck.

I talked with the initial owner and he said his wife bought it as a 'business' then couldn't make it work. Im trying to decide if she couldn't make it work because of her abilities, or because of the CNC itself. I have read briefly of DynaCNC going out of business, problems with the controllers/touchoffs, and people being quite pissed with the machines.

This machine is brand new, I would guess it has been ran for about 10 hours total, but no clue if it works. The controller box looked like it had been gone through pretty good, all wires labeled, ect (a bad sign to me, as the original owner tore it down trying to make it work).

Wondering if anyone knows what the thing is worth? I don't really have use for it right now but could in the near future if I had it at a good price. Also wondering if anyone knows what the cost and headache would be if I had to replace all the controls on the unit?

This unit actually sold at the last auction, but the buyer apparently didn't pay. It seemed like guys backed off at about the 3500 to 4k price (auction also included a computer for the cnc, brand new ~450$ jet dust collector, ~350$ porter cable router, corel draw, sheet cam). I believe the auction ended around 5k.

Finally I have heard they are a bit inaccurate due to the heavy construction of the gantry and motor system, i.e. it is hard to stop such a heavy thing accurately with fast servo motors flinging it all over.

Should I buy this thing or just leave it alone?? My gut tells me to let it go. What would be a steal of a price?



Thanks for the analysis,

cfehringer

plain ol Bill
10-06-2012, 05:08 PM
Dyna CNC is out of business. Like many others they had propritary controllers and software. Pig in a poke really - what is it worth - without knowing if it even works or not, not much. JMHO

c.fehringer
10-07-2012, 12:11 AM
Thanks for the response Bill.

Ya Im going to leave the thing alone, it was tempting to get it at a cheap price but the headache is not worth the discount. I think it was probably junk right out of the crate looking at DynaCNC's more current comments from users.

Mike 1948
10-07-2012, 11:57 AM
That machine is identical to mine except the length, mine is 48". I had troubles for the first year with mine. I bought "just" before DynaCnc went under. It uses Mach3 for control software. The main problem was the Mach setup which can be easily corrected. There were also some issues with the Torch height controls. It has been running great for 2 years now.
I noticed on one of the pictures that the router probably plugs into the orange cord which is plugged into the controller. The controller circuit is rated for 7 amps max, that router is probably a 10 amp minimum. I run mine on a sparate line.
If you can get it for a "song" it might be worth it. You could always put a new controller on it if you can't get that one working.

Mike

cheetahcnc
10-07-2012, 12:18 PM
A realistic value is the physical components, labor to assemble, and freight. Value the controller and all the motion components with the confidence you feel in them, or $0. Check out the linear bearings, racks, gears etc. Deduct for deficiencies. If the PC actually boots, and has a Windows COA, all the better. I would probably scrape up $1500 or so if it was close to home. It may go double that at an auction, as the history you know may not be common knowledge, and some buyers assume machines run as good as they look.

Jim

ger21
10-07-2012, 02:10 PM
The price of all the components to build that, if purchased new, would probably be about $4000 or more. The servo's and Gecko's are about $300/ axis (1 motor and 1 drive). Can't see the X axis well, but if they are Hiwin rails and bearings like the gantry, they're worth at least $1500.


Finally I have heard they are a bit inaccurate due to the heavy construction of the gantry and motor system, i.e. it is hard to stop such a heavy thing accurately with fast servo motors flinging it all over.

That gantry is not heavy duty at all. It looks like a single extrusion, which is not nearly rigid enough for a fast moving router.

Mike 1948
10-09-2012, 08:56 AM
The price of all the components to build that, if purchased new, would probably be about $4000 or more. The servo's and Gecko's are about $300/ axis (1 motor and 1 drive). Can't see the X axis well, but if they are Hiwin rails and bearings like the gantry, they're worth at least $1500.



That gantry is not heavy duty at all. It looks like a single extrusion, which is not nearly rigid enough for a fast moving router.

Mine DynaCNC would run a Milwaukee 3 1/4 hp router doing 3D relief carving at 100 ipm, so it will do it.

Mike

ger21
10-09-2012, 11:56 AM
100ipm is very slow for a big router. My wooden skate bearing machine with a PC690 will carve at 190ipm no problem, powered by a Xylotex running on 24V..

Mike 1948
10-09-2012, 12:12 PM
100ipm is very slow for a big router. My wooden skate bearing machine with a PC690 will carve at 190ipm no problem, powered by a Xylotex running on 24V..

100 ipm isn't really to bad when you are slinging around a 12 lb. router up and down for 2 1/2 D relief carving without losing steps. It would cut at your speeds no problem if I was doing a regular pocketing routine or normal vcarving.
Anyway I guess I got off topic.

Mike

MackB
10-14-2012, 12:39 PM
I have had a 4x8 stepper version of this table I bought in 2006. Most of the components with the exception of the drive electronics were off the shelf, and generally good quality.
My electronics were by CandCNC so I can actually still get service. Many of the later servo/stepper drivers were proprietary, but replaceable with a new set.
My impression was that the company went through a lot of employees, and there were a lot of small detail changes. I just replaced my 33vdc power supply with a 70vdc which has helped the loosing steps issue that I have had since I got it. Going through the power supply design recommendations on the Geko drive documents the power supply was not well matched to the motors, from the factory.

Many of the z axis drives were acme screws which can have some issues.

So, If you treat this as just a collection of parts, and review every design point and update as needed like you were building from scratch, you could get a deal on parts. Just don't think this is anywhere near a ready to go item.