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poorfarmer25
08-27-2012, 08:31 PM
Hello I am doing profile cutting in hard and softwood with a 1/4 inch bit that works well, however it is very wasteful cutting that thick of a kerf, What size of bit is the best balanced small diamater vs rigidity.

ger21
08-27-2012, 08:34 PM
Depends what you're cutting. How deep do you need to go, how fast do you want to go?

I'm going to guess that 1/4" is probably the best balance for you.

pirko
08-28-2012, 04:53 AM
Hello I am doing profile cutting in hard and softwood with a 1/4 inch bit that works well, however it is very wasteful cutting that thick of a kerf, What size of bit is the best balanced small diamater vs rigidity.

This is for long time talk. Many ways, many solutions. If you need send e-mail. Regards Libor

poorfarmer25
08-28-2012, 06:27 AM
I understand feedrates, rpms, step over, and other things have to be set somewhat by ear but Wouldn't something between say 1/16 and 1/4 be more efficient?

Cutters flex more when they are a smaller diameter but they have less material forced into them would that not make a smaller one better up to a point?

I'm still new at this maybe I am looking at this wrong

ger21
08-28-2012, 06:45 AM
Answer the questions I asked in my previous post?
If you're cutting 3/4" material, you usually can't use anything smaller than 1/4", and something larger is usually more rigid, and allows you to do the job much faster.

Different materials will call for different sized tools. There is no "best" tool that works for everything. You must be cutting some small parts if the 1/4" cut is wasting too much material.

txcncman
08-28-2012, 07:25 AM
Be very careful with this. According to the Natural Resource Protection Act of 1998, "the kerf obtained when cutting materials with vertically rotating cutting tools must always equal one-half the thickness of the material being cut" "in order to reduce cutting tool breakage, and thus save natural metal resources". Suggested penalties to include, but not limited to, $1000.00 fine. (NaRPA - 1998, section 14-g)

pirko
08-28-2012, 08:33 AM
Hello I am doing profile cutting in hard and softwood with a 1/4 inch bit that works well, however it is very wasteful cutting that thick of a kerf, What size of bit is the best balanced small diamater vs rigidity.

look on e-mail. I will send you best contact. Libor

poorfarmer25
08-28-2012, 07:54 PM
Different materials will call for different sized tools. There is no "best" tool that works for everything. You must be cutting some small parts if the 1/4" cut is wasting too much material.

I understand there is not a magic bullet cutter, What I am doing now is making some simple beach chairs out of cheap softwood for prototyping, I have added square holes for the slats to fit into and the necessary fillets at the corner so they fit properly.

I was thinking with a smaller cutter I could make the fillets smaller and less noticeable, cut somewhat faster, and possibly fit more parts per board with a smaller cutter.

If you're cutting 3/4" material, you usually can't use anything smaller than 1/4", and something larger is usually more rigid, and allows you to do the job much faster.

If I lower my depth of cut will this still be a problem?

I guess I'm not seeing the whole picture.

ger21
08-28-2012, 07:59 PM
There are really any bits smaller than 1/4" diameter that are capable of cutting 3/4" deep. Most have a 1/2" flute length, or less.

How can you cut faster with a smaller tool?

If you think a smaller tool will work better, than by all means try it, and let us know what the results are.

poorfarmer25
08-28-2012, 08:16 PM
ahhh okay I think I understand now I was not considering the leverage on the end of a narrow cutter and the reduction in feed rate it would require.

:withstupi
What I had in my mind was some of the newer chainsaws,they have a thinner bar and chain so they cut faster with a smaller engine, while achieving the same purpose.

txcncman
08-28-2012, 08:43 PM
Cut with a large bit and then clean out corners by either over cutting or by using a smaller bit.

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