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View Full Version : New Machine Build My 13x13 Solsylva



Garage Elf
04-29-2012, 05:54 PM
After a bit of research I decided on the Solsylva 13x13 as my toe-in-the-water approach to building a CNC. I'm satisfied with the choice - the instructions are very clear, and I've learned a lot.

I've gotten the X & Y axis's complete and have uploaded a video to youtube

When I was doing my research on different builds and designs I was amazed to find out that the majority of builds tend to be "based on" someone else's plans, but modified by the builder for their own special reason. I wanted to build one exactly following the plans, and that's what I've done.

In the video I am running it at 8 IPM, but it worked equally well at 12 and 25IPM.

I have a pen attached in leiu of a z axis for now.

Details:



CNCplans from Solsylva.com

Unit is 13x13, uses 1/4" x20 threaded rod, fixed gantry / moving x axis table

Frame is built from 1x4 and 2x4 pine, bottom is covered with spar varnish, gantry is blue solid color deck stain

Steppers are 270oz bi polar / 4 wire

Electronics are a kit purchased on Ebay for ~$200 for control board and power supply

The circuit board design is TB5650

Wire from power supply to board is 12 gauge (romex)

Wire from board to steppers is 20 gauge

Computer is a Dell OPTIPLEX GX280 P4 2.80 GHz / 1.0 GB / 40 GB / Windows XP purchased off Craigslist for $50 just for this application

Mach3 in demo mode running the steppers

Gcode for the spirograph came from the Spirocnc program I found here (http://www.cnczone.com/forums/opensource_software/14861-spirocnc.html) -- Thanks Steve/Spalm for that!
I have ordered a Bosch Colt and will look to complete the Z axis this week.

Overall, an educational and exciting project for me. I took the low budget approach with the driver and got a cheap kit off of Ebay. The instructions left a lot to be desired but I spent too much time worrying and thinking about it. Once I got it hooked up it worked fine.

I already have the wanderlust thinking about my next, larger build. But for now I want to complete this and get into some basics cutouts and routing, maybe try a carving bit and program too.

CNCZone is an awesome site, I've learned a lot an continue to find great info and helpful people here.

If anyone reading this has any suggestions for a 'starter' end mill that will fit the 1/4 collet on my Router, please let me know. For now my needs are simply cutting and drilling 1/4" to 1/2" plywood and MDF.

OCNC
04-29-2012, 08:03 PM
For now my needs are simply cutting and drilling 1/4" to 1/2" plywood and MDF.

Nice job. You're going to find that those feeds are very low for wood routing. Hopefully you can get closer to 100 IPM. I've had good success with 1/4"-0.25
Hi-Lead screws from Roton.

Chris

flojor10
04-29-2012, 08:32 PM
After a bit of research I decided on the Solsylva 13x13 as my toe-in-the-water approach to building a CNC. I'm satisfied with the choice - the instructions are very clear, and I've learned a lot.

I've gotten the X & Y axis's complete and have uploaded a video to youtube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dplQAxvOm3g)

When I was doing my research on different builds and designs I was amazed to find out that the majority of builds tend to be "based on" someone else's plans, but modified by the builder for their own special reason. I wanted to build one exactly following the plans, and that's what I've done.

In the video I am running it at 8 IPM, but it worked equally well at 12 and 25IPM.

I have a pen attached in leiu of a z axis for now.

Details:



CNCplans from Solsylva.com

Unit is 13x13, uses 1/4" x20 threaded rod, fixed gantry / moving x axis table

Frame is built from 1x4 and 2x4 pine, bottom is covered with spar varnish, gantry is blue solid color deck stain

Steppers are 270oz bi polar / 4 wire

Electronics are a kit purchased on Ebay for ~$200 for control board and power supply

The circuit board design is TB5650

Wire from power supply to board is 12 gauge (romex)

Wire from board to steppers is 20 gauge

Computer is a Dell OPTIPLEX GX280 P4 2.80 GHz / 1.0 GB / 40 GB / Windows XP purchased off Craigslist for $50 just for this application

Mach3 in demo mode running the steppers

Gcode for the spirograph came from the Spirocnc program I found here (http://www.cnczone.com/forums/opensource_software/14861-spirocnc.html) -- Thanks Steve/Spalm for that!
I have ordered a Bosch Colt and will look to complete the Z axis this week.

Overall, an educational and exciting project for me. I took the low budget approach with the driver and got a cheap kit off of Ebay. The instructions left a lot to be desired but I spent too much time worrying and thinking about it. Once I got it hooked up it worked fine.

I already have the wanderlust thinking about my next, larger build. But for now I want to complete this and get into some basics cutouts and routing, maybe try a carving bit and program too.

CNCZone is an awesome site, I've learned a lot an continue to find great info and helpful people here.

If anyone reading this has any suggestions for a 'starter' end mill that will fit the 1/4 collet on my Router, please let me know. For now my needs are simply cutting and drilling 1/4" to 1/2" plywood and MDF.

My first endmill was a $20 Freud 1/4 2flute carbide endmill that I got from home depot, for wood and aluminum. My machine takes cuts at about 30-35 ipm and it performs very well with this bit. Of course this isn't optimum speeds so your bit will wear faster, so I wouldn't get a really good endmill.

louieatienza
04-30-2012, 06:39 PM
That looks great! My first CNC was also a Solsylva build.

I agree with the others, that once you get accustomed to CNC, look into a higher lead ACME screw and anti-backlash nuts, which will help a lot when cutting.

Garage Elf
05-13-2012, 08:41 AM
My first endmill was a $20 Freud 1/4 2flute carbide endmill that I got from home depot, for wood and aluminum. My machine takes cuts at about 30-35 ipm and it performs very well with this bit. Of course this isn't optimum speeds so your bit will wear faster, so I wouldn't get a really good endmill.

Flojor10 - thanks - I picked up the 1/4" 2 flute bit (also picked up a 1/8") from HD & it's working great for my test cuts.

louieatienza
05-13-2012, 10:55 AM
Also look for single flute spiral and straight bits, which work better at slower speeds and higher rpm than multi-flute bits...

flojor10
05-14-2012, 10:55 PM
Flojor10 - thanks - I picked up the 1/4" 2 flute bit (also picked up a 1/8") from HD & it's working great for my test cuts.

Glad to here that, didn't know they had a 1/8 also I guess I just haven't seen it. Louie, I didn't know that straight bits worked better, I actually find that they heat up faster. One time I was using a straight bit on plywood and it caught the wood on fire. This is probably more because the dust was still in the profile, but that's why I like endmills, because they clear the chips better.

louieatienza
05-14-2012, 11:34 PM
Glad to here that, didn't know they had a 1/8 also I guess I just haven't seen it. Louie, I didn't know that straight bits worked better, I actually find that they heat up faster. One time I was using a straight bit on plywood and it caught the wood on fire. This is probably more because the dust was still in the profile, but that's why I like endmills, because they clear the chips better.

flojor10, it really depends on the situation. But I've used a lot of SINGLE flute straight bits with good results. Especially on some materials where the "lifting" caused by an up-spiral can cause problems. But usually, the more the number of flutes, usually, the slower the spindle or the faster the feed....