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mhackney
02-28-2012, 03:00 PM
I'm back from my ski trip and ready to get building my SeeMeCNC H-1 3D Printer (http://shop.seemecnc.com/H-1-3D-Printer-Kits_c2.htm) kit. I ordered the complete kit and it arrived a week ago Saturday. I had just enough time to peek in the box. It was well packed and shipped - stuffed with peanuts.

In addition to the printer - which comes with a parallel board and cable to run from Mach3 and a PC - I wanted to learn about the Arduino (http://www.arduino.cc/) platform so I ordered a Generation 6 (http://reprap.org/wiki/Generation_6_Electronics) board (from MakerFarm (http://makerfarm.com/catalog/i14.html)). In addition to supporting open source software to control the printer, it also supports Windows, Linux and Mac OSX. I plan to run from OSX in my office since my shop is all PCs running Mach but I can do that too with the included hardware. Once I have things going, I can decided what direction is best for me.

In addition to the information SeeMeCNC makes available on their web site, they have a lot of other info, STL files, etc on their alternative site SeeMeCNC.org (http://seemecnc.org/) and a related Yahoo group (http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/SeeMeCNC/) and there will probably be a few of us here building these as well (I know Hoss has a kit too). I talked to Steve and John at SeeMeCNC several times and they are very enthusiastic and helpful. I offered to help write their Assembly Manual for the H-1 so I'll be working on that in parallel to my build.

Here's what came in the box (everything except an ATX power supply is shown, I had the power supply connected to my Gen6 board and didn't want to take it apart to photograph):

http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s11/v31/p781813092-3.jpg

and a closeup of the contents of the hardware package:
http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s10/v16/p998380512-3.jpg

and some of the injection molded parts:
http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s3/v23/p861336215-3.jpg

You can see that I've started some assembly in the photograph. More later...

cheers,
Michael

jeremy0203
02-28-2012, 04:37 PM
this one is smaller than the prusa right?

mhackney
02-28-2012, 04:40 PM
That is correct. It's a puppy but a decent size to start.

DogWood
02-28-2012, 05:18 PM
you're going to enjoy it, I built my makerbot and had a good time.

once you get assembled the real work begins :drowning:

getting everything tuned and working smooth takes a bit of effort but once it's there you can print about anything you can imagine, lots of fun.

mhackney
02-28-2012, 05:24 PM
I'm looking forward to it. I had been following RepRap for a few years but never got motivated to build one. I used a high end 3D printer back in the day (1990s) to prototype turbine rotors for automotive turbine engines. It was very cool but cost about a million bucks! I bet this little guy could produce a very close proximity to what we were able to get from that machine - at least for the smaller parts.

cheers,
Michael

mhackney
02-29-2012, 12:25 PM
Front and Rear Base Frame sub-assemblies complete.

http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s3/v40/p440659285-3.jpg

The next step is the Z axis base sub-assembly and then these all go together to make the completed base. Things move along pretty quickly but you need to keep the parts organized! I'm using those black plastic microwave dinner trays with 2 to 4 compartments to keep screws, etc in. It's helping a lot. As I write the assembly manual, I am making a master parts list to include in the document. I'm very happy with the quality of the moldings and other parts, this is a nice kit.

cheers,
Michael

hoss2006
02-29-2012, 12:28 PM
Cool, I'll just wait for your instructions, looked like a lot more pieces in the box than the prusa.
Hoss

mhackney
02-29-2012, 12:29 PM
There are a LOT of parts! Many of them are identical. Pretty clever how they design these so that a single part is used in multiple ways. That way, if you are printing a machine, you only need to optimize a few parts and then make a lot of them.

cheers,
Michael

Rescue35
02-29-2012, 01:30 PM
Thank you in advance. My kit just got here and I'm sure I will be making use of the information I can gather from your progress.

mhackney
02-29-2012, 02:54 PM
and here is the Z Axis Base Sub-assembly:

http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s3/v41/p494985774-3.jpg

Next step is to put these 3 sub-assemblies together and adjust them. The threaded rod uprights with the bends on each end (4 of them) came pre-bent in my kit. I talked to John and that is how all kits are shipping. So, that eliminates a troublesome operation for some. They may need a little tweaking but the bends look good.

cheers,
Michael

rpovey
02-29-2012, 07:02 PM
I've just got to mount the timing belts to complete the mechanical portion of the build.
The one thing that caught me out was during the extruder assembly, you MUST seat the bearings as deep as possible in the pockets of the plastic gears.
If you don't the gears ride on each others faces, and either you can't turn the mechanism or the pinch roller doesn't turn.

The other thing I'd recommend is the diagram for the Z lead screws shows a locknut above the Base, I'd just go buy 2 1/4-20 nuts and use those instead (this is what's shown on the yahoo group), getting that lock nut in that location is a pain in the ass.

As far as I can tell my Kit was missing one 1/4-20 nut and one 10-32 nyloc nuts.

I think design wise there are a number of clever thing in there, but the part count is certainly daunting when you first start. Luckily it reduces pretty quickly.

I probably won't get the electronics wired this week, and I'm out of town again next week, so I'll probably see yours run before I finish mine. Looking forwards to it.

mhackney
02-29-2012, 07:37 PM
Here is the completed and adjusted base assembly:

http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s11/v35/p680534361-3.jpg

Next steps are the bearing sub assemblies and stepper motor mounting. I upgraded to the steel bearings and just completed assembling 32 of them on their dowel pin/axels. That was a little tricky but I came up with a workable technique I'm adding to the manual. Basically, use 400 grit and sand a little taper on one end of the plastic dowel pin, add a little machine oil and then slide on a washer, bearing and the other washer. Works pretty well.

cheers,
Michael

rpovey
02-29-2012, 08:00 PM
I built the bearing sub assemblies first don't forget to put the bearings on the axis rails before attaching them to things, this caught me out at least once and I hate taking things apart again.
I'm still using the plastic bearings, I wanted to see how the stock machine performed before upgrading. You can feel the out of round in the plastic bearings when you slide the table or the printhead, so I suspect I'll be upgrading fairly soon after I get it running.

mhackney
02-29-2012, 08:11 PM
I know what you mean about taking things apart! I've had to do that several times so far. But, that's good for writing the manual, I go back and add the missing steps in as I go.

I just completed the Y Bearing Blocks. The adjustment mechanism is very simple and clever.

http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s1/v20/p146158407-3.jpg

Each of the two screws on the edge engage a captive nut inside the bearing block. As you screw them in, their end pushes against the plastic axel/dowel pin of a bearing assembly, pushing it in. Simple and effective.

cheers,
Michael

mhackney
03-01-2012, 11:48 AM
Here are all of the bearing blocks assembled and ready to go:

http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s3/v43/p498859034-3.jpg

That big pile of parts has dwindled away to almost nothing now! The hard part is next, putting this all together.

cheers,
Michael

rpovey
03-01-2012, 12:39 PM
The blocks with the 3 and 2 rollers combined, you'll want to reverse the screws on one of them. I know it doesn't state this in the assembly instructions, but the ends of the screws interfere with the hot end when you bolt on the head.
I assembled mine like yours and ended up having to swap two screws around to clear the hot end. Though thinking about it, I guess I could just have reversed one of them on the rails. and had 3/2 on each rail.

doorknob
03-01-2012, 12:45 PM
What tools (if any) are you using to do the assembly?

Philips and flat-blade screwdrivers? A wrench or two? A sledgehammer?

rpovey
03-01-2012, 12:52 PM
you need a phillips screw driver a 1/4 inch wrench a 3/8 wrench and ideally 2 7/16ths wrenches (though I used one and an adjustable wrench).
You also need a 5/32 drill and a set of imperial allen keys (can't remember the exact sizes used).
having an electric screw driver will save you from a couple of blisters.

mhackney
03-01-2012, 12:54 PM
So far,

1/4", 3/8", two 7/16" wrenches
3/16", 3/32" Allen wrench
needle nose pliers
hobby knife
#2 Phillips screwdriver
electric drill with 1/8", 5/32", and 1/4" bits
15" ruler (need to measure 12-1/8")


I am almost done with the mechanicals so this is pretty much the tool list for that. Electronics will require a soldering iron, wire cutter/stripper.

cheers,
Michael

mhackney
03-01-2012, 03:31 PM
Coming along nicely:

http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s11/v36/p280397731-3.jpg

Y Table mounted and smooth as silk. X carriage mounted and smooth as silk. Y and Z steppers mounted.

I'm at the stage now where I'm not sure if I should adjust and square what I have before proceeding or get it all together "sloppy" and then adjust and square. I'll ask the guys at SeeMeCNC for recommendations on what's the best approach.

cheers,
Michael

rpovey
03-01-2012, 04:47 PM
There is nothing you'll mount after what you have there that will affect squareness.
If the 4 intersecting screwed rods at the bottom are square, pretty much everything else will fall into square.
You'll still need to measure the 2 rods at the front and back and square those, and of course check the table rails for squareness, although if they are out of square you'll feel in when moving the table.

doorknob
03-02-2012, 12:16 AM
I'm following this eagerly, the play-by-play is much appreciated.

Are you recording the amount of assembly time (either per step or cumulatively) as you go along?

mhackney
03-02-2012, 08:13 AM
Thanks. I am actually writing the manual for SeeMeCNC as I go so the time is not typical of what a normal build would involve. I'd like to complete the manual and then build a second machine and time as I go. I build a bit, write a bit, test what I wrote and then move on, so it is relatively slow going. There have been a few times that I missed something in the drawings and had to go back and disassemble things to correct. These get documented back at the correct place in the manual. That alone should save several hours for folks!

I'm just using my iPhone and kitchen table for the photos not my usual photo booth and Canon 7D. These photos are not intended for the manual - all of the images in the manual are computer generated from the CAD drawings. I think they work much better. There may be a photo here and there for tricky things, we'll see.

cheers,
Michael

rpovey
03-02-2012, 12:17 PM
I do think a manual will help people a lot, while the SeeMeCNC drawings are all accurate some of them are at best obtuse to interpret, most especially the exploded view of the extruder. Once you've put it together the diagram makes sense up to that point there are pictures of parts with no clear indication of where they fit.

I put the majority of the mechanicals together in two sittings, perhaps 4-6 hours total and an extra couple to figure out the extruder assembly. Having said that I made mistakes and had to back track, there are also a few things I would do differently which would make assembly easier if I were doing it again.

It's a lot of parts, but it really just comes down to build the sub assemblies, put them together.

doorknob
03-02-2012, 03:47 PM
I ordered the kit with the plastic and hardware parts, along with the ball bearing upgrade kit.

I already have some NEMA17 motors, a Chinese TB6560 board, a power supply and a licensed copy of Mach3.

I guess that I will either buy an Easy Stepper Driver board from SparkFun or else throw together my own driver for the extruder motor.

Also, I ought to order some of the feedstock ahead of time.

Michael, I know that it's premature to ask, but if you will be looking for a "guinea pig" to test your instructions before you release them into the wild, I would be willing to volunteer.

mhackney
03-02-2012, 04:08 PM
Hey guys, in addition to having some decent instructions, I'm making a parts list - by sub assembly - for the build. I've identified lots of differences already. This should help the guys at SeeMeCNC with parts and quality control. Also, there are some undocumented (as of yet) components for things like the Z timing belt idler (see photo below).

http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s3/v39/p45867264-3.jpg

doorknob, send me your email address in a PM. I'll double check with the guys at SeeMeCNC but I would love to have a couple of extra sets of eyes to give feedback, etc.

cheers,
Michael

mhackney
03-02-2012, 11:00 PM
And the extruder is now complete and documented. Lots of parts in these!

http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s3/v40/p815630227-3.jpg

http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s3/v38/p640291482-3.jpg

I didn't have the high temp silicone to cement the thermistor in the Extruder Barrel. I'll pick that up tomorrow.

Now I have the mechanicals complete. I spent some time on the phone today with John from SeeMeCNC (he's following this and other threads here on the zone - hi John!) to answer some questions I need for the manual. I got the scoop on the X and Y timing belt mounting as well as validated the Z timing belt idler. It's all pretty cool.

Now that I've done this, I think I could fly through the next one, especially with the instruction manual :)

Cheers,
Michael

foam27
03-03-2012, 02:23 AM
Ordered mine a couple of days ago as well.

The big draw for me was the molded parts ;)

I just hope that it's rigid enough to handle higher accelerations.

I wish I ordered the bearing upgrade kit, now that I heard that the plastic ones are out of round :(

rwskinner
03-03-2012, 02:35 AM
The bearing upgrade is well worth the money. I also used bearings for all the idler pulleys and that helped a lot as well especially on the X.

Richard

mhackney
03-03-2012, 08:03 AM
Once the machine is assembled it is locked in pretty rigid. The guys on the yahoo forum and John at SeeMeCNC are running these at high rapids and getting great prints. The molded parts are a great. I can't imagine printing all those parts to make another machine! The RepRap community is a lot like the early software/computer movement - "tools to make tools" (a quote from the book Hackers). Inevitably, a new generation of users step in to utilize the technology for other purposes. Kits like the H-1 facilitate that as do pre-assembled machines.

Steel bearings come with the H-1 for the Z axis screws and the extruder idler pulleys. The basic kit has molded bearings for the X, Y and Z followers on the linear rails. I ordered the steel bearing upgrade too and glad I did. That said, they are standard off the shelf bearings you can get at Boca Bearings or VXB. You'll need thirty-two R2ZZ (1/8" ID x 3/8" OD x .156 W) ball bearings. Standard fare. The dowel pins used as bearing axels are plastic (very rigid, maybe a filled nylon?). I believe (but not 100% positive) that the same size is used for both the molded and steel bearings so the pins that come with the base kit will likely work with the steel bearings. I'll try to confirm this with Steve or John.

Cheers,
Michael

mhackney
03-03-2012, 08:11 AM
Forgot to mention, John at SeeMeCNC just posted these videos where he replaced the extruder head with a dremel for engraving acrylic and aluminum. Using Mach and engraving the Roadrunner. The results look pretty good.

SeeMeCNC H-1 Engraving Acrylic - YouTube

SeeMeCNC H-1 Engraving 6061-T6 Aluminum - YouTube

Check out SeeMeCNC's YouTube Channel (http://www.youtube.com/user/seemecnc) for more interesting stuff.

cheers,
Michael

Rescue35
03-03-2012, 09:01 AM
Looking good. I am hoping to finish the mechanical assembly today myself. It isn't to bad once you get past the shock of the amount of hardware that comes in that little box.

I did have to pick up some 1/4-20 allthread as my kit was short two 12" peaces and I believe I have 2 extra 10.5" peaces instead.

Keep it up this is very helpful.

KnacK
03-03-2012, 09:05 AM
Hey Michael,

Out of everything make sure you document the alignment of the machine to get it square. That was one of my biggest issues and I might still be fighting a small squareness issue still.

Chris Muncy

rwskinner
03-03-2012, 09:09 AM
You're right, the molded plastic parts are really nice and seem very durable and was the main selling point for me (Ah, okay, and price was too).

I want to be sure and make a comment to remind ourselves that some of the things SeeMe did was to build a great running machine for an unbeleivable price so lots of folks could dive into this fun hobby. In order to acheive that goal, the factory "out of the box" machine had to have some consessions made such as the nylon bearings as an example. They work fine and most people are going to mod everything they get anyways.

Since I have both, the Mendel and the H1 I'm doing comparisions between the machines and the different control stratagies out of curiosity more than anything. With that said, it really is an unfair comparision because I'm comparing a $400 machine to an $800 machine. It's hard to beleive that a machine that cost half as much produces close to the same results!

Richard

LeeWay
03-03-2012, 09:14 AM
Looking great so far. Nice looking kit as well. I am working on a Prusa like Hoss's. I have the linear bearing kit. I have to say that the next iteration of this little machine could really use those. They are sweet. It would simplify both the amount of parts and adjustments needed I think. They aligned well in the printed parts my kit has, so I know they would do even better in molded parts.
Keep up the good work. I know documenting things are a challenge.

mhackney
03-03-2012, 09:17 AM
Thanks for adding that Richard. You know, as for controls, I picked up a RepRap Generation6 board for $130 from MakerFarm. It is all inclusive with stepper drivers, temp control etc and pre-assembled. You use Open Source software with it. Replacing it for the parallel driver, thermostat (a kit that needs to be soldered), and that "little red board" in the H-1 kit would reduce cost a bit more and decrease complexity. Not an issue if you already have a Mach license.

It is also just a matter of time before EMC will run these. In fact, the new version of Slic3r generates Mach and EMC g-code so I assume it should work now. Add on a Dremel tool and you have a nice little engraving machine that could easily cut balsa wood and foam for RC models.

Very cool stuff!

cheers,
Michael

mhackney
03-03-2012, 09:18 AM
Lee, thanks. Also, could you post a photo of the Prussa linear bearings? I'm curious to see what they look like.

cheers,
Michael

LeeWay
03-03-2012, 09:30 AM
Like thousands of ebay listings and first builds on the Zone, they are simple unsupported round rail bearings. They fit Drill rod very well.


Here is an Ebay listing.

12pcs LM8UU 8mm Linear Ball Bearing Bush Bushing | eBay (http://www.ebay.com/itm/12pcs-LM8UU-8mm-Linear-Ball-Bearing-Bush-Bushing-/110730791567?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item19c811ca8f#ht_2407wt_908)

mhackney
03-03-2012, 10:23 AM
A little soldering completed (and documented). First the Thermostat. It is actually a Velleman Kit (MK138) that comes in its original packaging and instructions. I just documented a few tips.

http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s3/v40/p162546629-3.jpg

And the Heating Resistors soldered in parallel:

http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s8/v9/p477871677-3.jpg

And I think that's it for getting all the sub-assemblies finished! Now its wiring up the driver board, that funky little red board, the thermostat, hot end and motors. Then I should be ready to test.

cheers,
Michael

mhackney
03-03-2012, 10:40 AM
That "little red board" is an easy driver stepper driver for the extruder stepper.

http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s11/v36/p315321353-3.jpg

Michael

electronrancher
03-03-2012, 01:31 PM
You're going to want to use crimps on those heater resistor leads, and on the wires you attach to them - they get hotter than the melting point of solder and can fall off.

mhackney
03-03-2012, 02:50 PM
I've read that too. Any suggestions on how to route the wires to the hot end/leads?

regards,
Michael

electronrancher
03-03-2012, 08:42 PM
I used to run the heater and thermistor pairs along the extruder cable and down to the electronics. But recently I mounted the Vellman board up on the extruder carriage and now I just run one pair down for 12V DC. Then the leads from the heater and thermistor are just a couple of inches instead of a couple of feet.

Watch your clearance to the belt with those wires. I zip tied the pairs to one of the hot end mounting holes, which made me feel a bit safer about not ripping the thermistor out. The heater would just turn on all the time and slag the hot end if the thermistor pulled out or came disconnected.

mhackney
03-03-2012, 09:01 PM
Thanks electronrancher. What machine do you have? The big challenge on the H-1 is the lack of space between the X carraige bearing mounts where the hot end and extruder mount. There is very little clearance to route the wires from the heat resistors out and back. But, all that said I did get it wires up. The challenge for me is to do it in a way that can be documented in the manual I'm writing so others can replicate it.

So I'm all wired up and ready to plug it in and configure Mach...

Tomorrow!

Cheers,
Michael

rwskinner
03-04-2012, 12:20 AM
I set my resistors up exactly like that and soldered them. It last less than an hour and the solder dripped off the connections. I then used some crimp ferrules and hadn't looked back. I'm just trying to save you a headache later.

Richard



A little soldering completed (and documented). First the Thermostat. It is actually a Velleman Kit (MK138) that comes in its original packaging and instructions. I just documented a few tips.

http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s3/v40/p162546629-3.jpg

And the Heating Resistors soldered in parallel:

http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s8/v9/p477871677-3.jpg

And I think that's it for getting all the sub-assemblies finished! Now its wiring up the driver board, that funky little red board, the thermostat, hot end and motors. Then I should be ready to test.

cheers,
Michael

mhackney
03-04-2012, 09:17 AM
Thanks rpovey. I know any of us can get this thing together from just a photo and some drawings. But there are a few little details that are worth knowing up front. The latest, once you have the extruder assembly ready to install you'll find very little clearance for the hot end between the triple-double bearing blocks that make up the X carriage. Simply urning the screws around on the left side block so the heads on both sides face "in" give you that little extra room you need. Steve at SeeMeCNC told me yesterday that they turn the bottom screw that actually interferes around - you can do that after the machine is built too. But why not just do it right the 1st time.

cheers,
Michael

mhackney
03-04-2012, 09:26 AM
Hey Richard, I changed mine also and will document using crimp connectors. That was an easy thing to change and eliminates a problem area. I presume the thermistor leads can be soldered? They are much skinnier and would be tricky to crimp.

Cheers,
Michael

lerman
03-04-2012, 01:47 PM
I used to run the heater and thermistor pairs along the extruder cable and down to the electronics. But recently I mounted the Vellman board up on the extruder carriage and now I just run one pair down for 12V DC. Then the leads from the heater and thermistor are just a couple of inches instead of a couple of feet.

Watch your clearance to the belt with those wires. I zip tied the pairs to one of the hot end mounting holes, which made me feel a bit safer about not ripping the thermistor out. The heater would just turn on all the time and slag the hot end if the thermistor pulled out or came disconnected.

If I were designing something like this, an open or shorted thermistor would cause a shutdown rather than an overheat.

Ken

rpovey
03-04-2012, 02:17 PM
I'm looking forwards to getting back home Saturday, so I can start the wiring, I have a RAMPS board I'm going to try and use, but I'm very interested in how you eventually route the hot end wiring, along with with how you sleeve the thermistor and resistor wires.

Doubleoh9
03-05-2012, 01:51 AM
I bought an H1 when this thread got started. I had been wanting to build a 3d printer for a while and all this excitement pushed me to jump in. I was really interested is what a cheaper kit could deliver.

First off, the documentation is terrible, but the yahoo group and wikis really help. I didn't get the bearing upgrade. The big problem with the stock bearings is that they are really out of round. Another problem is the axle shafts. The bearing kit still uses those plastic axles which isn't the greatest. I turned my bearings true using an arbor and cut new axles from 1/8 inch brass rod. The brass rods don't flex when you adjust the bearing tension with the screw. I also turned a new larger bearing for the lower position of the bearing block to account for the smaller size of the stock bearings I turned true. Linear bearings would be a great upgrade.

My kit was missing 2 sections of 12" all-thread that form the bottom of the frame. I had some rod that I could cut down and use. The rest of the construction went well. Even with my trued up bearings, there is significant slop in the bearing blocks. The initial prints show this. Another area is the backlash. Not having real bearings on the belt drive limits how much tension you can run to limit backlash.

The 3 axis board really requires work. The diodes on the extruder motor pins need to be removed or the pulses look like saw teeth on the oscope. There is no plug included for these pins in the kit. I had a plug from a computer CD rom to sound card that worked. The opto isolators also need to be by-passed or your prints will look like a leaning tower.

The file on Seeme's site doesn't have the correct parameters for Mach 3. I used 800 steps per for x and y. 64000 for z. Rapids are 900 on x and y and 8 on the z. My extruder set as the A axis is at 1950 steps per and 30 ipm. Your results may vary.

I'm using Slic3r for my g-code so I set my extruder to run as the A axis. This is nice because the extruder will reverse. Slic3r also generates g-code quick.

Overall, this kit is a great start and a platform to improve upon. These kits are not for those who are afraid to modify, improvise, and adapt.

rwskinner
03-05-2012, 06:00 AM
Yes, on my H1 one they are soldered. I used some heat shrink to insulate them and the secure the connections. On the Mendel I crimped them. I haven't had an issue from either one.

Richard


Hey Richard, I changed mine also and will document using crimp connectors. That was an easy thing to change and eliminates a problem area. I presume the thermistor leads can be soldered? They are much skinnier and would be tricky to crimp.

Cheers,
Michael

mhackney
03-05-2012, 08:06 AM
doubleoh9,

All good points. One thing on the bearings, even the steel bearings come with the stiff plastic axels. As you noted, this is to allow adjustment of the bearings. I can get these to be silky smooth with no wiggle, etc. I think the mechanical parts of the H-1 are pretty straight forward and the assembly manual I'm writing will make it a fairly easy build. The electronics, especially the 3 axis driver, is a bit of a pain. I don't mind building up boards but clipping diode and jumping boards is trickier! I also spent almost all of yesterday trying to install a fresh copy of XP on an old PC, Mach and then configure so I can document the process for the Setup and User Guide. What a disaster! I have built 4 CNC machines using Mach and had no problems with any of them. On this machine, as soon as Mach connects to its driver, it blue screens. Same with the Driver Tester. I wasted a good day on that. I'm trying to find another old PC (this one was a Compaq my others are Dell or Sony towers).

I started using Slic3r too and it is a lot less complex to install and is very fast. We'll be using it in the documentation for the software.

cheers,
Michael

mhackney
03-05-2012, 08:09 AM
Thanks Richard, I soldered and used heat shrink tubing on my thermister too. Seems like it should work. Everything is all set, wired up, and ready to go. I plug things in and turn on the power and the steppers energize. But, (see previous post) my PC is crap and I need to swap it out. I'll get it going with my Dell I normal use on my lathe tonight just to get it moving under mach. I think longer term, that Gen6 board with built in temp control, etc is looking pretty good!

cheers,
Michael

jolafson
03-05-2012, 03:07 PM
Hey Guys, John here from SeeMe

Wow, these threads are taking off fast aren't they? It's amazing to think that what was just an idea and a "hey, what if we" in November has become so big so fast. I don't know if I can thank you guys enough for making it happen.

A few points to everyone reading this I'd like to bring up are,

Mike (mhackney) what an amazing job, and thanks for pitching in and helping out on the manual side of things. I suck at that in writing. I could show you how to build some amazing things in person, just don't ask me to write it down. Writers block I guess (haha). Your hard work is not going un-rewarded, you've earned your spot in "the crew" here.

Another point, yes, the bearing design does suck a bit, we know. However, we wanted to keep as much of the origional Huxley reprap alive as possible. Those are the bearing designs it uses. Don't think we'll be using that on our next machine! (Yes, our NEXT machine, a few months out prob.) Someone said it perfect earlier, we had the goal to cut the cost in half of building a 3D printer, and some things had to be backed up in terms of bearings etc... to make it even possible. We all are "hackers" or "makers" so I know that most of you prob. won't even get to print number 20 before you've already designed/re-designed something to make it bigger faster and stronger. That was another point, we WANT you guys to make it unique. So much about the machine is from comments/suggestions by our customers, like the new PEEK barrel capturing the teflon, the o-ring washer stack on the extruder, the 1.75mm AND 3mm grooves for filament, the list goes on and on. We (Steve and I) watch the yahoo group closely, and I peek in here too, to see what others are talking about, and we're listening. Believe me, we are scheming up some good stuff over here.

Kinda long winded I know, but hey, I'm waiting for the Mazak to drop a bar and thought I'd pop in here.

As always, anyone is selcomed in our groups page and to email us with any questions at all.

You guys rock!
John Oly

mhackney
03-05-2012, 05:45 PM
I have movement and a hot hot end! Now to do a littl tuning and print a part!

Cheers,
Michael

cornbinder23
03-05-2012, 10:07 PM
Thats awesome Michael!
You must have been diligently toiling away to have it this far!
Can't wait to see a print

JTCUSTOMS

mhackney
03-05-2012, 10:40 PM
So close!!! Unfortunately, my extruder is only spinning in 1 direction. I've gone through every wire and can't figure it out. I could easily get this to work with a G540 but the point was to use the off-the shelf kit components. The extruder is powered by a little easy stepper board that is wired in to the 3 axis stepper driver. The extruder is set up as an A axis. It rotates the same direction no matter which way I jog.

Time to sleep on it!

cheers,
Michael

hojpoj
03-06-2012, 08:35 AM
The extruder is powered by a little easy stepper board that is wired in to the 3 axis stepper driver. The extruder is set up as an A axis. It rotates the same direction no matter which way I jog.


I'd scrutinize the connection to the step/dir pins going in to the easy stepper board. Take a multimeter or something and check the direction pin, something might not be bringing the voltage hi/lo, hence only moving in one direction.

LeeWay
03-06-2012, 08:48 AM
I agree. I remember having a loose wire to a motor once and it only ran one direction.

mhackney
03-06-2012, 10:43 AM
Well, I know I am getting 0 and +5 at the end of the DIR line on the EasyStepper board when I change jog direction in Mach - measured with a volt meter. I'll double check the wiring to the stepper tonight and maybe switch steppers to eliminate that as a problem.

mhackney
03-06-2012, 05:44 PM
Well, I got it working. I think the CNC gremlins were in my shop last night. I came home, detached the DIR lead from the EasyDriver. Then with the motor running using Mach's Servo Frequency Generator (under Diagnostics tab - a trick John told me last night, very cool) set at A axis, 2000Hz and 60 seconds reverse so I had plenty of time to test, i touched the ED's DIR pin to the +5 and GND pins alternately on the side of the board (these are 5V and GND signals the ED outputs to drive small things). And wahla, the stepper reversed as expected. I also knew that the DIR signal was making it from the 3 axis board to the end of the jumper connected to the ED - tested that last night. So, it made no sense why it didn't work. Soldered the DIR lead back on, tested it and now it works fine. Even though I scrutinized the connections with my magnifying headset, there must have been a bad connection or something.

Anyway, it works now. I have a bit of adjustment/setup on the extruder to do and then should be ready to print. But I have a Boy Scout meeting to lead tonight so it will have to wait :(

cheers,
Michael

mhackney
03-07-2012, 08:48 PM
I have my first print - a test cube. It took a bit of finagling. Im using PLA - which had a tendency to melt up the teflon tube in the barrel and jam. A little fan cured that.

http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s3/v38/p740386255-3.jpg

Now, the only issue I have is that the part has a lean in the X direction and a funny lean-back-lean in the X.

http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s3/v39/p944544228-3.jpg

I am using the stock 3 axis driver card and there is a mod to replace some opto isolators with jumpers that I have not done yet that might be part of the problem. I also have very low torque on my extruder stepper - its on an Easy Driver - and it stalled a few times and required a little hand assist feeding of the filament. I have some ABS on order to try too.

cheers,
Michael

Doubleoh9
03-07-2012, 11:38 PM
Take those optoisolators out. That is your problem. You can also turn up the current on the easy driver. I can feed my extruded at 30ipm using 1.75 mm ABS. Never stalls. I had stalling issues before I removed the diodes and jumpered the pads.

Good luck. Keep at it.

mhackney
03-08-2012, 09:47 AM
Yup, the optoisolators were the issue. There are several long threads about it here on the zone and on the H-1 yahoo group (http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/SeeMeCNC/message/1126) about this issue. The H-1 group specifically addresses skewed parts like mine. I made the fix and am ready to try another print when I get home tonight.

cheers,
Michael

timothy svec
03-08-2012, 10:03 AM
I bought an H1 when this thread got started. I had been wanting to build a 3d printer for a while and all this excitement pushed me to jump in. I was really interested is what a cheaper kit could deliver.

First off, the documentation is terrible, but the yahoo group and wikis really help. I didn't get the bearing upgrade. The big problem with the stock bearings is that they are really out of round. Another problem is the axle shafts. The bearing kit still uses those plastic axles which isn't the greatest. I turned my bearings true using an arbor and cut new axles from 1/8 inch brass rod. The brass rods don't flex when you adjust the bearing tension with the screw. I also turned a new larger bearing for the lower position of the bearing block to account for the smaller size of the stock bearings I turned true. Linear bearings would be a great upgrade.

My kit was missing 2 sections of 12" all-thread that form the bottom of the frame. I had some rod that I could cut down and use. The rest of the construction went well. Even with my trued up bearings, there is significant slop in the bearing blocks. The initial prints show this. Another area is the backlash. Not having real bearings on the belt drive limits how much tension you can run to limit backlash.

The 3 axis board really requires work. The diodes on the extruder motor pins need to be removed or the pulses look like saw teeth on the oscope. There is no plug included for these pins in the kit. I had a plug from a computer CD rom to sound card that worked. The opto isolators also need to be by-passed or your prints will look like a leaning tower.

The file on Seeme's site doesn't have the correct parameters for Mach 3. I used 800 steps per for x and y. 64000 for z. Rapids are 900 on x and y and 8 on the z. My extruder set as the A axis is at 1950 steps per and 30 ipm. Your results may vary.

I'm using Slic3r for my g-code so I set my extruder to run as the A axis. This is nice because the extruder will reverse. Slic3r also generates g-code quick.

Overall, this kit is a great start and a platform to improve upon. These kits are not for those who are afraid to modify, improvise, and adapt.

My Kit was also missing the 2 12inch threaded rod's. 3.00$ at Ace. No big deal. I did give seeme a call and left a message on their machine. Just wanted to give the shipping and packaging dept. a head's up.

mhackney
03-09-2012, 09:54 PM
Well, one by one I chased down the Gremlins and finally got a print. It still ain't the pretties thing but it's mine and I love it. Here is what it took:

1) my EasyDriver board was just a little anemic. I replaced it today and the new one has just a bit more umph. Not as much as I'd like but enough to push the extrudeder.

2) the real culprit was the extruder gear axel closest to the front of the machine was tightened too much and was warping the sides of the extruder body. Even though the gear train still turned smoothly and easily, this warp had some effect. With it, the stepper stalls frequently. Loosen the bolt and the stepper stopped stalling. I could tell no difference in the gear movement though.

3) my X axis jump was caused by skipping a tooth on the belt. The problem was my 3 x axis idlers were too tight and were not spinning. The belt was literally dragging across them. Fast movement caused them to snag and led to a skip.

4) the screw that secures the extruder to the X carriage was too tight causing the extruder base plate to warp. Again, I am not sure of how this affected the extruder but when I corrected it, things worked.

Taking all of these things together I am now able to print. And here it is:

http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s3/v38/p449131571-4.jpg

Calibration Cube - laying on its left side. The bottom is on the left, top on the right, front facing the camera. This is 1.75mm PLA

It isn't perfect but has some perfect elements!

This is the Bridge Calibration Cube (http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:5011) on Thingiverse. It is a 25mm cube with square openings in each face. What's interesting/odd about my print is that the bottom layers up to the 4 posts at the corners look really good (left side of photo). The 4 posts then start to go bad - it seems that there is too much plastic as they start to squish into the extruder head and the head actually pushes the hot plastic around as it moves. You can see the top of the pillars (to the right) has really mushroomed. Then, after the bridges are formed, the top layers once again look pretty good. Here are the print's dimensions: 25.01mm H x 24.97mm W x 24.93mm D - not bad I think.

I am now hopefully optimistic! Any suggestions on the pillars? Probably a configuration option in Slic3r (which is really fast and easy to install and use).

I have ABS enroute to me so I'll have something else to play with.

cheers,
Michael

mhackney
03-09-2012, 10:19 PM
I should add that this was printed from Mach.

doorknob
03-09-2012, 10:42 PM
I'm curious about that cube - do you happen to know how many lines of G-code it took to print it? I wonder how much can be done within the 500 line limit of the unlicensed Mach3 (I have a licensed version, but I am wondering whether people who have not yet made the decision to get a Mach3 license will be able to do some simple printing).

BTW, I received my parts kit today, and hope to get started building it over the weekend.

mhackney
03-09-2012, 10:58 PM
8560 lines of code. These 3D print files are big.

Good luck on the build. It seems daunting with all those parts but they disappear fast.
Michael

cornbinder23
03-09-2012, 11:28 PM
Halfway through mine Michael!

Cant type much due to the carpal tunnel haha

JTCUSTOMS

a.ash
03-09-2012, 11:32 PM
I would personally like to reach out to you guys (Mike, Richard, and Hoss) and e-slap you silly (chair). Because of all the good information here on the zone my wallet is much lighter. My H-1 came today...and Richard has me building a took changer for my mill.

In all seriousness, thanks for the great information.

And now a question.. Where is the best place to buy filament?

Thanks again. :cheers:

Alan

Doubleoh9
03-10-2012, 01:48 AM
1) my EasyDriver board was just a little anemic. I replaced it today and the new one has just a bit more umph. Not as much as I'd like but enough to push the extrudeder.

l

Have you tried adjusting the current setting trim pot on the easy driver board? Mine came adjusted to the minimum.

Jim

mhackney
03-10-2012, 09:04 AM
Alan, pm or email me and I'll send you a copy of the assembly manual I'm working on for SeeMeCNC. As for filament, I just bought a gob of 1.75mm ABS from 3DPrinterStuff (http://3dprinterstuff.com/) (SeeMeCNC buys their filament there). I also bought some black 1.75mm PLA from Ultimachine (http://ultimachine.com/catalog/print-materials). I recommend both of these vendors. Also, I started with PLA but then everyone suggested I should start with ABS as it is easier to work with! I'd go with the ABS. You can also modify your PEEK barrel to work with 3mm filament but it is a one-way street. 3mm seems to be more readily available than the 1.75mm.

cheers,
Michael

mhackney
03-10-2012, 09:07 AM
Hi Jim, yes I have. In fact, the min/max markings on the ED board may or may not be correct! Apparently they were changed to be correct on the latest board but the manufacturer sourced a different pot that is configured opposite the original! But, it is pretty easy to tell if you have it at min or max. Mine is at max.

The 3 steppers driven from the 3 axis board are almost impossible to turn by had when energized. The ED stepper on the extruder can be turned with 2 fingers when energized. There is a big and very obvious difference in torque.If the extruder stepper had the same torque I could probably push aluminum filament through there! (j/k).

cheers,
Michael

a.ash
03-10-2012, 12:12 PM
Alan, pm or email me and I'll send you a copy of the assembly manual I'm working on for SeeMeCNC. As for filament, I just bought a gob of 1.75mm ABS from 3DPrinterStuff (http://3dprinterstuff.com/) (SeeMeCNC buys their filament there). I also bought some black 1.75mm PLA from Ultimachine (http://ultimachine.com/catalog/print-materials). I recommend both of these vendors. Also, I started with PLA but then everyone suggested I should start with ABS as it is easier to work with! I'd go with the ABS. You can also modify your PEEK barrel to work with 3mm filament but it is a one-way street. 3mm seems to be more readily available than the 1.75mm.

cheers,
Michael

PM sent. Is there any difference in print quality between 3mm and 1.75mm?

mhackney
03-10-2012, 12:15 PM
You should have the manual now a.ash - I got your PM.

I have not used 3mm yet but the size of the extrusion is set by the orifice not the filament. I can't think of any reason why the quality would be different if everything else is the same. The larger filament does take longer to heat and melt I've heard.

cheers,
Michael

rwskinner
03-11-2012, 09:35 AM
:) :) :)


I would personally like to reach out to you guys (Mike, Richard, and Hoss) and e-slap you silly (chair). Alan

rwskinner
03-11-2012, 12:12 PM
We have to see who is going to do the 4 or 6 automatic filament changer. I bet Hoss is already thinking about it. I know I have been.

Richard

eaglezsoar
03-11-2012, 12:40 PM
Does anyone know if a hot printer bed is available for the H-1 or maybe
it is not a necessity?

Doubleoh9
03-11-2012, 03:24 PM
The The H1 printing surface is smaller than the Prusa. I ordered a heated bed from Makerfarm.com and modified my H1 so the bed would fit. I took the diagonal all threads that were bent and replaced them with straight ones. I also added some Z travel by lifting the upper supports for the Z linear rod. I then put all thread cross bars in to support the top of the frame. I have 8mm linear rod coming next week and have a set of 12 linear bearings in hand. I'm going to replace all the bearings with linear ones soon. I'm making new bearing blocks now and will look at increasing the travel a bit.

I have had great luck printing directly to sanded acrylic but wanted a more complete system for printing larger ABS parts.

eaglezsoar
03-11-2012, 03:51 PM
The The H1 printing surface is smaller than the Prusa. I ordered a heated bed from Makerfarm.com and modified my H1 so the bed would fit. I took the diagonal all threads that were bent and replaced them with straight ones. I also added some Z travel by lifting the upper supports for the Z linear rod. I then put all thread cross bars in to support the top of the frame. I have 8mm linear rod coming next week and have a set of 12 linear bearings in hand. I'm going to replace all the bearings with linear ones soon. I'm making new bearing blocks now and will look at increasing the travel a bit.

I have had great luck printing directly to sanded acrylic but wanted a more complete system for printing larger ABS parts.

Good job in doing the modifications, and thanks for the picture. I will
have to consider doing something very similar.

amyers
03-11-2012, 03:53 PM
The The H1 printing surface is smaller than the Prusa. I ordered a heated bed from Makerfarm.com and modified my H1 so the bed would fit. I took the diagonal all threads that were bent and replaced them with straight ones. I also added some Z travel by lifting the upper supports for the Z linear rod. I then put all thread cross bars in to support the top of the frame. I have 8mm linear rod coming next week and have a set of 12 linear bearings in hand. I'm going to replace all the bearings with linear ones soon. I'm making new bearing blocks now and will look at increasing the travel a bit.

I have had great luck printing directly to sanded acrylic but wanted a more complete system for printing larger ABS parts.


Looks like a mendel now, any reason you didn't get one of those in the first place instead?
am

Doubleoh9
03-11-2012, 04:55 PM
I didn't know any better! In reality, I wanted a kit I could run from Mach3 and for the price it was worth it. The H1 can print ok out of the box, but I wanted to see how far I could push it. I like the extruder and have never had a problem getting it to feed well... and controlling it with Mach3 is nice.

The power supply died just a week in, so I bought a more powerful one that will power everything....extruder, motors, and heatbed.

I really wanted to learn 3d printing on something that I figured would work and then I will build something from scratch that doesn't have the many short cuts that are taken on these home built hobby kits. Some aluminum extrusion, aluminum brackets and motor mounts, real lead screws...etc. Truth is, a fancy one probably won't print that much better, but it will be fun to build. The biggest thing I have noticed is how important the printing parameters are!

mhackney
03-11-2012, 10:18 PM
I'm building a heated bed of my own design. I've done similar hot plates for other projects. I'll post results when I have it operational. Controlled via Mach through an Arduino.

As for why H-1 over mendel - for me it was 2 things that put me over 1) the fact that it is controlled by Mach and 2) it's cost ($350 for everything). However, now that slic3r outputs Mach gcode a mental or prusa or any of these machines can be controlled by Mach. The H-1 is a nice little machine though.

Cheers,
Michael

cornbinder23
03-12-2012, 01:52 AM
Hey Michael do you have any pics of how you attached your belts?
And are there any updates on the pdf's?

JTCUSTOMS

eaglezsoar
03-12-2012, 06:38 AM
I'm building a heated bed of my own design. I've done similar hot plates for other projects. I'll post results when I have it operational. Controlled via Mach through an Arduino.

As for why H-1 over mendel - for me it was 2 things that put me over 1) the fact that it is controlled by Mach and 2) it's cost ($350 for everything). However, now that slic3r outputs Mach gcode a mental or prusa or any of these machines can be controlled by Mach. The H-1 is a nice little machine though.

Cheers,
Michael

What is the voltage that these hot plates use and I've read about a
Velleman controller to monitor the temperature but I've not been able
to find one.

mhackney
03-12-2012, 08:07 AM
cornbinder23, I am waiting for some drawings to complete the manual and they happen to be the belt attachment drawings!

However, here's some photos:

X Belt - attach with 2 sheet metal screws and washers to the back of the carriage. Tension to take out slack. 5/64" drill through both belt and carriage for screws.
http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s3/v38/p740386255-3.jpg

Z Belt - this is the configuration of the idler (notice the sleeve used as an offset post, it is included in your kit). The idler goes in the long slot closest to the stepper. The slot allows you to adjust tension.

I don't have a photo of Y, I'll take one tonight. Basically it screws to the 2 posts in the center of the table. The trick is adjusting the back stepper mount/idler assembly and mating front idler.

cheers,
Michael
http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s3/v39/p45867264-3.jpg

mhackney
03-12-2012, 08:12 AM
eaglezsoar,
Hot tables typically work on 12 volts on these machines.

The thermostat is the Velleman thermostat kit #MK138 (http://www.intertexelectronics.com/Velleman-MK138-Thermostat-P1127.aspx). It is a kit. You also have to make a minor mod to work at high temp - replace R5 with a 10kΩ resistor (which is not included).

cheers,
Michael

EDIT: of course the link is failing now! Here's a link to a Google results page (http://www.google.com/products/catalog?q=velleman+thermostat&oe=utf-8&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=shop&cid=3876123821689353036&sa=X&ei=Nv5dT9fLL4eZgwefn7mhCw&ved=0CFQQ8wIwBA).

eaglezsoar
03-12-2012, 02:50 PM
eaglezsoar,
Hot tables typically work on 12 volts on these machines.

The thermostat is the Velleman thermostat kit #MK138 (http://www.intertexelectronics.com/Velleman-MK138-Thermostat-P1127.aspx). It is a kit. You also have to make a minor mod to work at high temp - replace R5 with a 10kΩ resistor (which is not included).

cheers,
Michael

EDIT: of course the link is failing now! Here's a link to a Google results page (http://www.google.com/products/catalog?q=velleman+thermostat&oe=utf-8&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=shop&cid=3876123821689353036&sa=X&ei=Nv5dT9fLL4eZgwefn7mhCw&ved=0CFQQ8wIwBA).

I assume the same mod would be made for the extruder board?
Also, it sounds like I would need the same thermister that the extruder
uses for the hot bed.

LeeWay
03-12-2012, 02:53 PM
I'm about ready to throw in my hat on the prusa model with the Gen 6 board. The machine is not too bad for starters, and the Gen 6 works great. It just isn't Mach 3. I am very used to Mach 3 now and I find it frustrating to adjust the firmware, slic3r and pronterface to get better looking parts. What I find most frustrating is working in MM when my machine is SAE. Just confusing a bit.

I am ready to put my G540 to use. I'll probably be selling the Gen 6 soon at a good discount off new.
It will be great for someone just learning this stuff and builds a MM machine. ;)

The software is coming along as well, but has quite a distance to go to catch up to Mach.

Sooo, where can I find some info on setting up Mach to run a G540 on a prusa?

Anyone have an xml file for Mach?

mhackney
03-12-2012, 03:20 PM
eaglezsoar, yes same mod for the extruder heater (resistors). Search in the Yahoo SeeMeCNC group for "mouser thermistor" to get the part number from Steve. They sell them on their site too.

cheers,
Michael

mhackney
03-12-2012, 03:32 PM
Lee, their is a Mach config file in the files area on the SeeMeCNC group.

I've only been using Mach on my H-1. The software trail goes:

CAD->STL-> Slic3r (create gcode) -> Mach

The way to think about it is that Slic3r is similar to a CAM app, it creates the machine code from the drawing. A couple of things about Mach control:

1) temperature control for the hot end and bed is still DIY. A couple of us are working on an arduino controller interfaced to Mach via Modbus. the same Arduino can control 2 (or more) heaters as a PID as well as control fans and other things. Once you have the Arduino talking to Mach you can do all sorts of cool things. But, there are no instructions on the net yet. Andy Wander on the SeeMeCNC group posted code and mods to his Vellman thermostat to control it from Mach. I have not tried it yet but it seems pretty cool and not expensive.

2) the printing parameters are all done in Slic3r, just like most milling parameters are done in a CAM app.

cheers
Michael

LeeWay
03-12-2012, 05:02 PM
oppps..

LeeWay
03-12-2012, 05:03 PM
Thanks for the info.
So aside from the 540, I would need two of the velleman kits, correct?
I saw where someone mentioned that Mach can turn the heaters on an off and monitor the temps.
Is the Velleman the only thing I would need to do that?

On a scale of 1 to 10, my soldering skills are about 3. Can I tackle that kit? Twice? ;)

mhackney
03-12-2012, 05:12 PM
Right now, the temp control for the hot end and table are manually controlled by the Velleman boards and not interfaced to Mach. Andy on the Yahoo group has posted mods to the Velleman and Andruino code to control it. I haven't checked to see if he's implemented the Mach Modbus interface yet but I think that is his plan. I am using a slightly different approach that eliminates the Velleman boards and is more like what the RAMPS and Gen6 controllers do - use a MOSFET to control power to the hot end and hot bed under Arduino control. One advantage is that there is an open source PID library for the Arduino which should provide sophisticated control. The Arduino would still talk to Mach via Modbus. Basically, Mach will tell the Arduino to set the hot end and hot bed temps and the Arduino will report the current temperature for these. Another advantage is that it eliminates the cost of two Vellemen boards. Arduinos are reasonably inexpensive.

cheers,
Michael

LeeWay
03-12-2012, 06:48 PM
I did download those files for Mach and screen sets etc.
Looks like it's moving in the right direction.
I think I will save the 540 for my machine build. I want to use some extra THK linear ways I have and some extrusion built more like a mill I think.
Just single rails on each axis. By that time, Andy should have the other sorted out more.

I have been trying to use 24 VDC on my Gen 6 board and was having real issues with the temp fluctuating wildly. So, been using it turned down to 17 where it isn't so bad. My 12 VDC supply gets here Wed.

I think Colin from MakerFarm may have sorted out the issue though trough PWM settings. That is the hope. I can't calibrate the thing with temps varying 30 and 40 degrees C. ;)

Thanks for the speedy answers too.

mhackney
03-12-2012, 07:50 PM
cornbinder23, here are the Y axis belt photos:

Y axis belt routing and attachment to the bottom of the table. I am not sure if those large white plastic washers are mounted correctly or if they are even needed. I am working with John & Steve at SeeMeCNC on this for the manual.
http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s1/v19/p198408467-3.jpg

Closeup of the table attachment. I think the washer and screw would be more than fine.
http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s9/v13/p286995298-3.jpg

From the front of the table. You can also see my top secret hotbed prototype.
http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s3/v23/p55089858-3.jpg

cheers,
Michael

mhackney
03-12-2012, 08:03 PM
Just to fend off the inquiries, I am working on a Mach controlled hot bed and extruder barrel. Both will be controlled from a single inexpensive Arduino micro controller running a PID algorithm for precise temperature control. The Arduino speaks to Mach via Modbus. The Arduino can also control several fans (on/off) from Mach as well as a variety of other things like LED lightening. Very cool these Arduinos, surprisingly inexpensive and not difficult to program at all. I have the PID working and speaking to a Modbus host (right now a simple Mac OSX app but it will be easy enough to connect to Mach).

I researched the whazoo out of heated beds. I've made several similar devices for vulcanizing rubber and a bamboo drying oven. The commercial MakerBot device is too large for these H-1s plus I wanted a design that can be adapted to other sized machines easily. Also, the thick copper PC boards that MakerBot and others use are not cheap and not easy to find. And they really are not the best way to create heat from electricity - that's what Nichrome was invented for! My bed has a milled insulted base, nichrome wire running in the channels evenly and closely spaced, capped with a .1" aluminum top surface that evenly spreads the heat. You can print on it, blue painters tape, glass, acrylic or anything else you want to put on there. One of my design goals was to minimize Z travel loss. Right now I am at about 1/2" with everything. I could make it thinner if I could find thinner insulator that I use for the bottom. Worse case, I could mill it to thin it down.

I do want to get the prototype working before showing more details since it is a work in progress. Stay tuned! I'll likely release this as open source but am considering offering kits or finished beds for several common sized beds since there really aren't very many options out there.

cheers,
Michael

jerbro
03-13-2012, 04:18 AM
I'm looking forward to what you come up with - and the results of your testing. ...and, if I can wait for it, I may be your first customer. : )

-Jeremy

timothy svec
03-13-2012, 05:14 PM
Greetings,
Do you have an E.T.A. on your hot bed? I'm looking to go with this hotbed listed in the links. But would hold out for yours if you think it will be a better design.

Velleman MK138 Thermostat (http://www.intertexelectronics.com/Velleman-MK138-Thermostat-P1127.aspx)
TechZoneCommunications.com LLC (http://www.techzonecom.com/detail.php?pr_id=57)

mhackney
03-13-2012, 05:57 PM
No, I have no idea yet. I still have to complete the prototype and I'm waiting for some materials to arrive for that. The bed could be controlled with the Vellman but I am planning to control it from Mach. You can configure it however it makes sense to you when you build it.

regards,
Michael

mhackney
03-14-2012, 11:05 AM
Timothy, I wanted to research that print bed and controller a bit and so I googled "techzonecommunications.com" (the vendor for the Huxley print bed linked above). What I found was a history of them not fulfilling orders and product quality issues. Here is but 1 report: techzonecommunications.com as a seller (http://forums.reprap.org/read.php?1,103975,106341)

Not trying to dissuade you from finding a working hot bed now but I did want to point out what I found.

cheers,
Michael

mhackney
03-14-2012, 11:14 AM
Timothy, I wanted to research that print bed and controller a bit and so I googled "techzonecommunications.com" (the vendor for the Huxley print bed linked above). What I found was a history of them not fulfilling orders and product quality issues. Here is but 1 report: http://forums.reprap.org/read.php?1,103975,106341

Not trying to dissuade you from finding a working hot bed now but I did want to point out what I found.

cheers,
Michael

timothy svec
03-14-2012, 11:46 AM
Thank you for the head's up. I didn't order from these guy's.
Hope to see your model soon. My control board should be arriving today. It will be a few day's till my weekend. So, my project isn't ready for a hot bed just jet. Again, thank you.
cheers,
tim

mhackney
03-14-2012, 09:37 PM
Finally, figured out my problem/s and I can print! I don't even know where to begin! All of the troubles I've had the last week with skipped extruder steps, horrible prints, etc turned out to be a screwed up Mach configuration.

First, my A axis was set up as an angular axis (Config->General Config... panel). I confirmed Dave's observation that when A is configured as angular, changes to Steps Per for the A did not actually affect the stepper. Even after I got things working, I went back and made A an angular axis again and tried it. And again, changes to Step Per did not have an effect. This has to be a Mach bug. I'll file a report along with Dave on that.

Now, once I was able to effect a change on the extruder with Steps Per by configuring Mach, I made sure I was in "mm" native units (Config->Select Native Units) before proceeding with checking and setting steps per for the other axes. I used Mach's built in calculator (Settings tab -> Set Steps per Unit above the Reset button) and did a quick calibration using a caliper to measure movement. For example, I selected the X axis in the tuning dialog and told Mach to move 1 unit - which should have been a mm. It moved an inch (the old X Steps Per was still set). I measured the actual movement in mm and entered that in the "how far did it actually move" field Mach displays. Repeat on Y and Z. Here's what I got (I used Jeremy's velocity and acceleration values as a guide):



X steps per: 31.99 velocity: 22860 acceleration: 5000
Y steps per: 32.09 velocity: 22860 acceleration: 5000
Z steps per: 2440.94 velocity: 200 acceleration: 75

I then moved on to the extruder A axis. I placed a tape flag on the filament and instructed Mach to move 1 unit. Again, it moved about an inch. I measured the actual distance in mm and entered that in Mach. Here's what I got:

A steps per: 71.20 velocity: 3000 acceleration: 400

I ran through a quick test on all 3 axis and the extruder and validated that movement was what was expected. I double checked the native units, saved the config, shut down Mach and restarted it. Verified that everything was how I left it and the movements were good too. Then I loaded a whistle that I slic3r'd and set my Z height (using a pice of paper under the nozzle) and hit Cycle Start. Here's a video of the print and finished product:

My First 3D Print - YouTube

(shot and edited on my iPhone - also a cool thing!)

Some notes: Once I got Mach configured in mm and the A as a linear axis things started behaving as I would expect. The A axis not responding to Steps Per changes when configured as an Angular axis is perplexing. At least now, we'll know what to look for!

cornbinder23
03-14-2012, 10:24 PM
You made my day Michael!!!
Congrats on the first print
Hey did you remove the 2 diodes in front of the ES connection to the TB6560?

I am in the process of wiring mine up right now and doing some of the mods
Which mods did you make to your board?

JTCUSTOMS

doorknob
03-14-2012, 10:30 PM
Very cool indeed.

I'm getting started with my kit tonight, by unpacking and separating parts.

Work has been keeping me pretty busy lately, and it's possible that I may be called upon to do some business travel soon, so I may not be able to put in as many hours as hoped in the near term, but will be following your guide as I go.

mhackney
03-14-2012, 10:31 PM
Definitely do the recommended mods to the 3axis board:

1) remove the 2 diodes and jump them
2) remove and jumper the optoisolators (specified on the photos on the yahoo group)
3) ground the easy driver to the parallel port ground

I didn't do these in my excitement to get printing and experienced funky behavior (skewed parts, missed steps). They all went away when I made these mods. I am working on the electronic configuration manual now and these will just be documented as must do steps.

Cheers,
Michael

cornbinder23
03-14-2012, 10:42 PM
Could you post a pic of your board and ES setup?


JTCUSTOMS

FannBlade
03-14-2012, 10:50 PM
Congrats on the first print. Looked pretty dang good if you ask me.

Fastest1
03-15-2012, 12:58 PM
Beautiful work Michael. I am sure the excitement is incredible.
I just got my kit as I was leaving for South Texas, so it is in my hands but due to limited tools down here I might not start til I get home. However I am going to reread all of your posts, manuals, groups etc so I am familiar. Oddly enough it doesnt look too daunting if I can keep my kids away from the parts.
In my experiences with Mach, odd things will start to occur and only a fresh install will cure the issues. Others might say differently and maybe a more experienced computer person wouldnt have to reinstall. I always have to. I am not knocking Mach at all, love it and its support. I just might not be their best operator :-)

rpovey
03-15-2012, 01:54 PM
Very cool, good to see it print.
I started wiring mine/fitting the timing belts this week, then realized I'd somehow misplaced one of the white gears that fits on the stepper motors.
I suspect during my business trip my cats may have decided it was a good toy and wondered off with it, I spoke with John earlier in the week and he's going to send me a replacement, great support.
In the mean time I did get X and Z wired to my RAMPS board and run through a couple of prints, to ensure everything was moving smoothly.
You have to be very careful with the idler pulleys for the timing belts, they will not turn if the bolts are too tight, or there is too much tension on the belt, I might try stripping them down, increasing the play in the outside plastic part and using some lithium grease to see if it makes them less sensitive.

mhackney
03-15-2012, 02:25 PM
Good point on the oilers rpovey, a few of us have been bitten by that. The symptom is a print that "jumps" left/right or front/back. That's because the belt is sliding on the roller and not rolling. The friction- especially at high rates - builds up and causes the belt to jump teeth. The fix is easy, loosen the screws that hold the idlers in place. However, if they are too lose, you can introduce backlash. The fix is to sand one end of the roller down a little. A drop of machine oil helps too.

cheers,
Michael

mhackney
03-15-2012, 03:23 PM
Well, minutes after I made that last post I had a scheduled conference cal with my boss. He's in CA, I'm in MA. Short of it is, I was laid off. So, after packing up my office, I came home, told the family, and took these photos of the 3 axis driver and EasyDriver! Seriously, this is a good thing. I'm in high-tech and my division has been struggling for some time. This was the kick in the pants I needed to do something bigger & better.

Here is the entire card with the EasyDriver mounted.I got this idea from Steve and John - use one of the fan screws to attach the ED to the heat sink. I used a 1/8" plastic spacer between the fan and board (it's a piece of the 3mm ID teflon from SeeMeCNC but any plastic or aluminum would work). You can see the opto jumpers top left.

http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s3/v41/p853035793-3.jpg

Here's a better view of the ED:

http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s9/v13/p755826567-3.jpg

And here's a closeup of the removed and jumpered diodes and the jumped optos:

http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s3/v40/p658066807-3.jpg

cheers,
Michael

SCzEngrgGroup
03-15-2012, 03:36 PM
"Short of it is, I was laid off. So, after packing up my office, I came home, told the family" - Welcome to high-tech in the 21st century! Last year, after having that happen twice in 3 years, I said "Screw it", and retired early. The last time was so my new boss could bring in one of his Cisco cronies, who is doing half the job I was. I now make my living making things in my shop. The boss is still an idiot, but at least I have job security! Good luck to you, I'm sure you'll find something better.

Regards,
Ray L.

cornbinder23
03-15-2012, 08:40 PM
I am very sorry to hear that Michael , but at the same time I cant help but feel your enthusiasm and drive for something better.
I can sympathize as I might be on the tightrope for a while, the company I work for had a very large explosion and fire a few weeks ago and we lost 60 % of our capacity to produce. This was months after upgrading the equipment on that process to the tune of 5 million$
They say its going to be about 40 million to rebuild and about a year at least!
We are Teamsters and I have been there for quite a while so I am 4th from the top as far as seniority goes, so I feel fairly "safe" but who knows maybe they will just shut the doors like they did to me when I worked for Tyco printed circuit group. But that was shortly after our Forbes top rated CEO got indicted for embezzlement in 99-00'

At least no one was killed, but we had a guy that had to be ladder trucked down 110ft. Out of a powder silo. He had pretty bad smoke inhalation and some minor burns but he's alive and kicking. I work in the engineering dept. with his father who coincidentally is the one who first got me interested in diy cnc.

He is building a 3d printer as well.

JTCUSTOMS

Fastest1
03-16-2012, 04:45 AM
Michael, I wish you the very best during this transition. Judging from your writing skills you might have a few avenues to pursue. Your help and contributions here have been fantastic. Thank you very much in case I hadnt said it before.

mhackney
03-16-2012, 02:33 PM
Thanks guys, I'm going to take a week to play and then look for a job! Already had a VC contact me (!) and another startup called yesterday to meet me for coffee next week. It's a start!

Cheers,
Michael

hoss2006
03-16-2012, 02:37 PM
Good to hear, you can't keep a good man down.
Best of luck with the new job pursuits, you'll bounce back in no time.
Hoss

mhackney
03-16-2012, 02:45 PM
Hey thanks Hoss. I have a few more things to polish off on my G0704 (remember those machines!) so the time will be well spent.

cheers,
Michael

mhackney
03-16-2012, 06:54 PM
I've been working on controlling the hot end and bed temperatures from Mach.
Surprisingly, there are really no out of the box products that do this. I am
using an Arduino that talks to Mach via Modbus - same as Andy's Velleman
interface. However, I built a simple circuit that uses a MOSFET to power the
heater and another to read the thermistor. There is a really nice PID open
source library for the Arduino that the RepRap controllers all use. I'm using it
too. Here's a photo of the prototype:

http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s3/v38/p586490711-3.jpg

The MOSFET is the boxy looking thing at the lower left of the breadboard. This
is only a single heater-control circuit but there will be two to control the hot
end and bed. There will also be 2 MOSFETs to control two fans - one for extruder
cooling and one to cool bridges. The Arduino has plenty of horsepower and I/O
capability to do a lot more if needed too. I might have Mach controlled LED
lighting for instance. Or maybe an extruder feeder.

At this point, I am ready to put together the complete circuit and finish the
Mach interface.

cheers,
Michael

jerbro
03-16-2012, 06:59 PM
I like the lighting control idea. Yes, please. : )

Jeremy

mhackney
03-16-2012, 07:01 PM
That would be pretty neat!

I got the rest of the materials to finish the hot bed today too. So I should be able to get that together now - especially since I have some "free" time :)

Cheers,
Michael

Rescue35
03-17-2012, 11:51 AM
Sorry to hear about the work predicament but I'm glad it is already starting to look better.

I managed to get Mach3 to move mine today. Just need to get the extruder to run and I may be in business.

Couple of questions I couldn't see the answer to in your pictures.

1:Which two diodes are you jumping out on the 3 axis board?

2:How are you grounding the EZstepper to the parallel port ground?

Keep up the good work.

On a side note there where a few pieces of missing hardware in my kit besides just the 2 12" of 1/4-20. I was missing 3 1/4-20 nuts and a 10-32 nyloc nut (which I had on hand) as well as 4 3mm bolts. I am not complaining as $2.50 at the hardware store had me set on everything. I just want people to be aware.

mhackney
03-17-2012, 01:37 PM
Rescue35,

1) the diodes are the 2 small components at the position in this photo. Simply bridge the pads with solder or use a short wire jumper.

http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s3/v41/p9420776-3.jpg

2) I actually removed the ground to the parallel port and simply use the 2 grounds (the middle two pins) on the four pin connector to the EasyDriver. Stick with that.

As for some of the missing parts - did you get four 1/4-20 Nylon lock nuts? These are used on the Z axis screws to retain the gear at the bottom rather than using four 4-20 nuts on each side. That freed up the 1/4-20 nuts I needed.

cheers,
Michael

Rescue35
03-17-2012, 08:52 PM
Thanks,

I received enough nylock 1/4-20 nuts.

I got the diodes taken care of and I already had the ground pins like that. Still no joy. The test gcode I was running didn't have an "A" axis so I fixed that, nothing. Jogging "A" via hotkey, nothing. Both lights for the "A" axis are always on, on the 3 axis board...never even a flicker. I used the same settings in Mach3 as you did for all axis.

I rechecked all my connections to and from the ezstepper board. Nothing ever changes and I'm at a loose.

cornbinder23
03-17-2012, 10:08 PM
Thanks,

I received enough nylock 1/4-20 nuts.

I got the diodes taken care of and I already had the ground pins like that. Still no joy. The test gcode I was running didn't have an "A" axis so I fixed that, nothing. Jogging "A" via hotkey, nothing. Both lights for the "A" axis are always on, on the 3 axis board...never even a flicker. I used the same settings in Mach3 as you did for all axis.

I rechecked all my connections to and from the ezstepper board. Nothing ever changes and I'm at a loose.

What are your port and pin settings for the A axis motor?
I loaded the seemecnc .xml for mach and had to change the ports for the extruder. IIRC I had to set the step pin to 16 and dir pin to 17, It was set to step pin 9 and dir pin 8.

Hey Michael hows everything going?
I am currently doing some "slight" upgrades to mine when I have a spare second or two, I was not impressed with how much it flexes with rapid movements on the X.
Now, I know that those full speed movements are only happening when the extruder is not printing and just traversing to the next point, but I just cant help myself.
I havent even printed anything yet, just got it together and talking to mach, and now its back in pieces. lol
Going to get it just right before I start learning the printing basics
I see sooo many printer build threads popping up I might just focus on getting mine done and then post some pics and vids, I will keep track of all the mods though.
Keep up your courage Michael!

JTCUSTOMS

Rescue35
03-17-2012, 10:17 PM
Thanks cornbinder,

That was the problem. I had to reconfigure a lot of the original SeeMeCNC xml setup.

Now that I have that done I'll try printing something tomorrow.

mhackney
03-17-2012, 10:34 PM
Rescue35, I was going to tell you the same thing! I discovered that about the Mach profile too. It will be updated and documented in the electronics manual I'm writing now.

JTCustoms, things are going well. I did determine that my 3 axis board has a problem though on pins 16 and 17. I may have done something jumpering the optos or diodes, I can't see anything odd but who knows. I used a single axis driver to replace the EasyDriver that has lots of umph. The stepper now holds great when energized but was still missing steps. Then I noticed that it did that even without filament. And it would go one way then the other when stepping a jog key.

Cheers,
Michael

Doubleoh9
03-18-2012, 03:34 AM
I posted awhile back right after I built the H-1. Now I've made a few improvements so i thought I would put some pictures up. Mods include:

Frame extended to allow a heat bed.
Heat bed with Vellman control.
Linear bearings on all axis.
Ball bearings on belt pulleys.
PVC pipe filament holder.
Aluminum table.

With the linear bearings, the axis move with near zero resistance and now belt tension can be higher to reduce backlash.

Jim

mhackney
03-18-2012, 09:27 AM
Great mods Jim. Can you use the stock linear rods with the linear bearings? Did this also increase your Y travel?

cheers,
Michael

Fastest1
03-18-2012, 10:09 AM
I had seen Chris Muncy extend his also to accommodate the heated bed. Just as I got my frame put together, I saw that. So down to HD for some all thread. Nice job.

cornbinder23
03-18-2012, 11:15 AM
I posted awhile back right after I built the H-1. Now I've made a few improvements so i thought I would put some pictures up. Mods include:

Frame extended to allow a heat bed.
Heat bed with Vellman control.
Linear bearings on all axis.
Ball bearings on belt pulleys.
PVC pipe filament holder.
Aluminum table.

With the linear bearings, the axis move with near zero resistance and now belt tension can be higher to reduce backlash.

Jim

Nice mods, I like the new mounts on the x axis, it gives good access to the hot end , I will be making new mounts for the linear bushings that showed up yesterday for my H1
On the Velleman controller did you just jumper out R6 to run the heat bed?
And are you running the everything off on power supply?

JTCUSTOMS

cornbinder23
03-18-2012, 11:26 AM
Great mods Jim. Can you use the stock linear rods with the linear bearings? Did this also increase your Y travel?

cheers,
Michael

They appear to be 8mm rods, which is what I am upgrading mine to
It doesn't effect the Y axis on mine. I will be making my new mounts probably out of plastic as I have a mess load of 1" thick UHMW and EPDM
I want to keep it as light as possible.
I also picked up a little box for all the electronics.
I am not sure how many amps the heated bed will pull, might need a little more power supply.

JTCUSTOMS

Doubleoh9
03-18-2012, 11:38 AM
Thanks guys.

The linear bearings I bought are for 8mm rods, so the stock rods don't work. However, the larger 8mm rods fit in the stock 90 degree clamps if you loosen them up completely. I was going to make new clamps, but these work. I turned down the ends so they would fit in the lower plates that hold the Z axis lead screws.

For the Velleman, I jumpered R6 and put a 4.7k in R5. R5 was trial and error to get the board to stay on til it reached full temp. I'm using the stock thermistor that comes with the kit. For ABS you can just turn the thing on without a thermostat because it only gets up to about 110c. I wanted the thermostat for lower temps. With R6 jumped, I can get the bed perfect for PLA.

I bought a new 550 watt power supply that has 2 separate 12 volt circuits. I suspect you could run everything off the stock supply, but I haven't measured total current. My stock supply died after a few days and long before I got the bed.

Jim

Doubleoh9
03-18-2012, 11:54 AM
Forgot to mention that travel remains stock...with slightly less in the Z because of the bed height. My z travel is now 5.125"

mhackney
03-18-2012, 10:15 PM
Thanks for the info. I'm looking at linear bearings to use in my next printer. Planning a home brew in aluminum a similar to a CNC router with a moving gantry.

Cheers,
Michael

Rescue35
03-20-2012, 08:58 AM
Well over the weekend I managed to get mine sort of functioning. I noticed that ReplicatorG wasn't producing Gcode for the A axis that Mach was looking for to run the extruder. Slic3r did no problem.

I think it is jumping on the X axis belt as the head slowly creeps toward the left.

The worst of it is that other than a little blob I couldn't get anything out of the extruder. It is getting hot, 240 degrees at one point via mechanical thermometer. The thermistor had popped out of its hole again. After letting it cool I removed the nozzle and it was full of a clear plastic when I was running black. Then it hit me, that must have been my teflon tube at one point. I will have to pull the entire hot end off to find out for sure whats going on.

mhackney
03-20-2012, 09:46 AM
That's correct Rescue35 - ReplicatorG the standard version does not support Mach gcode. The guys at SeeMeCNC have a special version of ReplicatorG. But SeeMeCNC is now supporting Slic3r and that is what I am documenting in the manuals. It suppers Mach natively now.

Jumping is typically caused by the belt rubbing on the idler rollers because they are tightened up too much and can't spin. Check all of the X idlers.

It sounds like you overheated and melted the teflon tube. You have to be careful with the thermister - it needs to be siliconed in place so it can't short or pull out and cause an overheat.

cheers,
Michael

rpovey
03-20-2012, 11:22 AM
I managed to print two test cubes before irreversibly blocked my teflon tube. I've ordered more.
In retrospect I think the extruder was slipping on my prints, and I wasn't getting a consistent amount of plastic, I'll calibrate it with the hot end in place next time to verify it's not slipping.

You have to be careful not to get it too hot, I'm pretty sure this was my issue as the heat soaks into the body of the hot end, the plastic in the teflon tube gets soft and the extruder creates a nice perfectly fitting plug inside the tube.
I think the answer is to run as cool as you can obviously still managing to extrude and have it stick.

timothy svec
03-20-2012, 02:38 PM
Greetings Michael, I just finished up soldering both of the mk138 boards for the hot bed and the hot end. Could you please help me with exactly what wires go where. (from the power supply to the mk138 control. (just a picture with arrow's if you have one) LoL... And from the mk138 control to the hot end) I understand the thermistor to the sensor part on the mk138. Also I'm using a 12V DC 30A 360W Regulated Power Supply. I see 24v/3a max on the mk138 board. Will I be OK with this set up? Also, This was my first soldering job. I took lesson's on you tube. :) It was good fun!!

timothy svec
03-20-2012, 07:21 PM
Just found this drawing.
http://seemecnc.org/assembly/25925%20H-1%20Basic%20Electrical%20Schematic%20rev1_2.pdf

so my question is. Why do you put a jumper across from com to 12v+?

mhackney
03-21-2012, 09:22 AM
Hi Timothy, I don't have any photos of the thermostat (mk-138) wiring yet. I just got another kit yesterday so I can photograph it as I assemble it for the electronics manual.

The PDF file you found is a good wiring diagram though so you should follow it.

Which jumper are you referring to? If you mean the one between black and green on the power supply, that only applies to using a PC ATX power supply. Your supply does not need this.

cheers,
Michael

timothy svec
03-21-2012, 10:40 AM
picture with red wire

mhackney
03-21-2012, 12:40 PM
Ah, of that jumper goes from +12V to the COM pin on the thermostat. This voltage will be output through the NO (normally open) pin when the relay closes - powering the heating resistors.

cheers,
Michael

timothy svec
03-21-2012, 03:09 PM
Thank You M.
I'm thinking of cutting a my own pcb board. I have a taig cnc. Just wanted to ask how your nichrome wire hot bed project was comming along?
cheers,
tim

timothy svec
03-21-2012, 03:31 PM
http://www.ecemiami.com/shopdisplayproducts.asp?page=3&sppp=10#

link to the pcb board I'm thinking of cutting for the hot bed.

mhackney
03-21-2012, 04:47 PM
Hi Timothy, your link is broken. However, all of the boards I found on this site are 1oz copper. You need 3 or 4oz copper to make a heater from a PCB. It is not easy to find the right material.

cheers,
Michael

mhackney
04-01-2012, 02:45 PM
For this who don't know, SeeMeCNC has created their own user form: SeeMeCNC Forums - Index page (http://forum.seemecnc.com) Lot's of good stuff!

I've now completed my homebrew hotbed and am just about to test it out. It gets to 200°F in less than 10 minutes and stabilizes nicely. Powered by a 2nd Velleman thermostat.

Here is the nichrome layout:

http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s3/v43/p423637340-3.jpg

This was put in a fiberglass sleeve and sandwiched between a 1/8" phenolic board on the bottom and .1" aluminum on top with 1/4" standoffs between/ Here is the power on test:

http://forum.seemecnc.com/download/file.php?id=94&t=1

The bed will be screwed to the H-1's table through holes drilled and countersunk in the corners.

eaglezsoar
04-03-2012, 10:47 AM
What is the size of nichrome wire did you use and how many amps
does this draw? Thanks for sharing this with us.

mhackney
04-03-2012, 10:51 AM
16 gauge, draws a little over 6 amps. Google NichromeCalc and you will find a great interactive calculator to help design a nichrome wire heater.

cheers,
Michael

mhackney
04-09-2012, 05:40 PM
Ok, firstly, the home brew hot bed works great. Heats up quick and nice even temp edge to edge. Minimal Z loss too.

Now the bad news, I mounted the hot bed to the stock H-1 table - which is ABS. Even with insulation and standoffs, it got hot enough to warp:

http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s3/v43/p143154763-3.jpg

And I was seeing a backward (Y) lean on one of my prints. Turned out to be the belt mounting post on the table bending! See the post on the left, it is tilted backwards. Apparently, as I was printing, it got hot and started bending back. The effect was a net lean backward on the Y axis.

http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s3/v42/p260117159-3.jpg

So I dismantled the table and made an ally cross brace to mount the hot bed on:

http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s3/v40/p794067694-3.jpg

Here is the underside of the cross brace with the new all-steel post to mount the Y belt and tensioner:

http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s3/v39/p1001142658-3.jpg

This won't warp! I'm printing now and it seems to be working well. Another advantage of this arrangement is that it's a lot easier to level the table now too.

cheers,
Michael

mhackney
04-09-2012, 05:44 PM
Here's a whistle I printed for my 10 y/o nephew this weekend. It has a bit of a slant on the Y - the precursor to the bent belt post I showed in the previous post. Print order: green, blue, yellow and orange. That green and yellow ABS extrudes like butter. By far the easiest colors I have to work with. Looks good too.

http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s3/v38/p925395309-3.jpg

I mistimed the color change from green to blue a little, but it came out pretty good for a first effort.

http://mhackney.zenfolio.com/img/s3/v43/p1003869755-3.jpg

cheers,
Michael

Rescue35
04-09-2012, 05:47 PM
Looking good. I need to delve back into mine and get her running.

mhackney
04-09-2012, 05:52 PM
I have to say that this little H-1 is a fun little machine. It does nice work and looks good to boot. Not as big as a Prusa. I was originally attracted to the Mach control aspect but it turns out that any of these machines could be controlled by Mach and the H-1 by any of the Arduino-based controllers. The biggest limitation of Mach control is that the hot end and hot bed are not controlled. They are managed manually with separate thermostats. Another gent (Steve Wander) and I are working on an Arduino based temp, fan and other goody controller that will interfaces to Mach via MODBUS. My version will control two heaters, 2 fans and have a few auxiliary relays for LED lighting, etc.

Cheers,
Michael

jerbro
04-09-2012, 06:27 PM
My version will control two heaters, 2 fans and have a few auxiliary relays for LED lighting, etc.

We're looking forward to it!

Jeremy

maker of things
04-16-2012, 09:11 AM
Does the printer make the same size "bead" for both 1.75 and 3mm hot end? I am a little unclear how this part of the machine works.

mhackney
04-16-2012, 10:46 AM
The size of the extruded "bead" is determined by the orifice in the nozzle not by the filament diameter. The easiest to get started with orifice is .050" and you can use either 1.75mm or 3mm filament if your extruder is set up for it.

cheers,
Michael

LeeWay
04-16-2012, 10:57 AM
Also the extruded plastic is a bit larger than the hole and it will tend to lay flatter on the print, so becomes wider with a thinner layer.
These variables are so..........um.........fun to play around with to finally get some good prints. ;)

If you have a good setup for PLA, throw out all the settings when you go to ABS. Behaves totally different. Different colors may also need a different fine tuning. I just label my ini files according to plastic type and color and sometimes part types. Different type parts can benefit from different settings too.
I have my ini setups on the desktop, but I can see that was a bad place to store them. Will be moving all of the soon.

mhackney
04-16-2012, 11:03 AM
Good point Lee! Also, as I learned the hard way, squirting out the bead under too high pressure will also make it sell on exit. Make sure to calibrate your extruder.

I've found more variation between ABS colors than PLA colors. Not sure why that is. I do the same thing with my Slic3r ini files - set them up for a specific color or colors and even parts if it needs something special.

Where are you thinking about saving your setups Lee? I keep mine on a Dropbox account so I can access them from all my machines.

cheers,
Michael

maker of things
04-16-2012, 11:36 AM
So the 1.75 is probably easier to melt, but the 3 is more consistant to feed?

-Jon

rpovey
04-16-2012, 11:50 AM
The consensus on 3 vs 1.75 is that 1.75 require less pressure to extrude.
This means there is an advantage with weak or direct drive extruders.
IME it also requires less pressure from the rollers in the extruder which means you're less likely to get stripping or slipping.

The reason everyone still uses 3mm is until recently it was a LOT cheaper and in some countries it still is, I was recently told that in the UK 1.75mm is 3x the cost per pound vs 3mm.

There is also a lack of well regarded hot-ends designed for 1.75.

rpovey
04-16-2012, 11:53 AM
As to all the configurations, you guys are way more organized than I am.
I just have 2 one for PLA and one for ABS when I swap reals I change the temperature and the volume multiplier in Slic3r.
I usually use a real before swapping, so I have to calibrate again anyway.

Fastest1
04-16-2012, 10:37 PM
Once I hobbed my roller, slippage is a thing of the past. 3mm seems to feed and perform just fine. Well as good as I was getting with the 1.75 LOL.

MiguelKendrick
04-04-2014, 04:17 AM
I think we have the same kit, never had any issue of filament jamming with that. And it’s also because I use quality ABS and PLA filament (http://www.3d2print.net/shop/filament/pla-filament/)s. I must say PLA filament is very versatile; all 3D printers on the market can accommodate this kind of material.