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Madclicker
11-15-2005, 11:10 PM
This is a twist on the usual "use the first machine to make parts for the second".

Background:

We went through 3 hurricanes in 5 weeks last year. I was flipping a property at the time and had an active contract that kept getting stalled because of the storm damage. Upside was the beginning of this year someone gave me a hurricane damaged doublewide. Stipulation was that I had to move it, demo a Florida room and carport and prep the lot for the new home. Ended up being a new flip project. I more than paid for the day labor for the demo from the Al i sold to the crusher and ended up keeping several very nice windows, sliding doors and some very nice structural and cage Al that I'm gonna make my second machine from.

I say second machine, because of what I've learned on this site. I want my first machine to be MDF based and smaller than the Al based table I started with. Learn on the cheap! I always intended my Al machine to be a cnc eventually, but I built it to originally be a glue-up and outfeed table for my table saw and router table. I cut all the pieces for the final design but didn't put it all together at first (see the first pic of the skeleton). It worked well for the many months I've used it, but now that I want to make torsion boxes, the old slop won't do. I had (est) .020 droop between the 4' spans for the 3/4" melamine MDF. OK for the cabinet work I was doing, but not good enough for torsion boxes.

This is my first post, so I'm gonna see how it goes....won't be my last!

Steve

Madclicker
11-15-2005, 11:23 PM
Don't have the pic attach thing figured out. Help?

spalm
11-15-2005, 11:23 PM
Welcome to the Zone.

Your Mom had good taste in naming children. :)

Show us your stuff, we can probably help. Anyone from a town called Lakeland deserves a break from all the storms.

Edit: Click on the Manage Attachments button to upload a pic. It has to be 800 X 600 or less, and less that .5meg in size.

Steve

Madclicker
11-15-2005, 11:29 PM
Steve,

I don't know yet how to post the pics i have taken....oh, smaller pics only (chair)

2muchstuff
11-15-2005, 11:46 PM
Are the pictures downloaded from your camera into your computer yet.

Madclicker
11-15-2005, 11:48 PM
OK, trying this pic post. This is my original glue-up table. Also serves as a great outfeed table.

Madclicker
11-15-2005, 11:49 PM
yahoo!

Madclicker
11-15-2005, 11:54 PM
I moved the top onto the router/saw table to do this.

2muchstuff
11-15-2005, 11:55 PM
See how simple that was. Now you have to keep us posted with all kinds of pictures.

2muchstuff
11-16-2005, 12:02 AM
To stiffen up that table for router use, I would add some diagonals between the legs and table, a couple more cross pieces under the table top and maybe a second piece under the other lenghtwise piece for support of the rails and gantry. Just an observation.

Madclicker
11-16-2005, 12:03 AM
yep, gettin easier. here's how I joined the outside corners. Ripped the flatbar from the 3" square tube. You haven't lived till you did a kickback with Al on a tablesaw.

2muchstuff
11-16-2005, 12:16 AM
Freud makes a nice multi tooth blade designed for non-ferrous metals.

Hope it didn't kickback into you.

Madclicker
11-16-2005, 12:27 AM
my worst kick back was from a panel. The Al kick was bad, but just so so

2muchstuff
11-16-2005, 12:33 AM
Are those bolts with nuts backing them up or self drilling screws. If they are self drilling screws that won't do. The constant starting, stopping and changing direction of the gantry will loosen up things for sure.

Madclicker
11-16-2005, 10:24 AM
Not self drilling but lag bolts impacted into too small predrilled holes. Also, each corner has an angle gusset on the inside with 6 more bolts....making a total of 22 bolts per corner. Don't think it's going anywhere. We'll see.

You must be a mind reader 2much. The pic below shows the extra Al to beef up the table and support the top better.

Steve

Madclicker
11-16-2005, 10:10 PM
I finished beefing up the frame and the first pic shows the structural and cage Al I will use to make the gantry and X motor and bearing posts....at least. The second pic shows how i use the lower table to store production parts and sub-assemblies. The extra storage is long overdue. Under the lower shelf I'll store my overflow tool boxes and free up even more floor space. Makes me happy as a dancing banana!

The last pic is the finished table. It is extremely solid, square, rigid, and more important to the first machine, it is dead nuts flat. You can see how I use it as an outfeed table for the tablesaw and router table. Also in the background is another freebee from this flip project. I made a nice clamp rack from some of the cage Al.

I guess this project will be on hold until I get my first machine in production. I'll start another blog for it soon.

Steve

2muchstuff
11-16-2005, 10:43 PM
With all those small pieces of wood, what is it that you make.

Madclicker
11-16-2005, 11:06 PM
LOL,

You pick up on 2much! I build custom router tables.

Steve

2muchstuff
11-16-2005, 11:25 PM
I bought one from Rockler hardware with all the trimmings over the summer and have yet to assemble it. I will admit that I didn't get the fancy lift mechanism. I'm hoping to eventually get the big Porter Cable router, what is it something like 3.25 HP. Currently I have an older Craftsman 2 HP unit with a 1/4" collet. My end result here is to make new raised panel arch doors for the kitchen out of white oak.

What is your opinion of those quick change collets/bit holders. There is a Sears Hardware store cross town closing it's doors and they are 30% off for the kit.

Madclicker
11-16-2005, 11:44 PM
I don't how much is too commercial on this site. I'll just post a few pics of the tables I sell. I bet some have seen them before on other sites.

Steve

2muchstuff
11-16-2005, 11:49 PM
Very nice table, AAAAAA+++++

Looks like a piece of fine furniture that you would find in a high end funiture store. Is the router plate aluminum or melmine.

Madclicker
11-17-2005, 10:00 PM
The insert is black acrylic with 6 leveling set screws.

Is the system you're talking about "quickrout". Looks interesting and if you get it I'd like to hear what you think. I've never used it, but can say from experience that easy setup is very welcome. I now have 4 laminate routers that keep me from constantly swapping bits and changing the setup.

I also need to make new cabinet doors for my project home. HF has a 3 piece panel raising set for $20 and they send me a 20% off coupon every week.

Steve

2muchstuff
11-18-2005, 12:26 AM
"Quickrout" was what I was refering to, didn't remember the name. There is a traveling woodworking show that comes thru town every March, displaying bunches of tools. At the last show there was a company that had a 5 pc. carbide raised panel/drawer kit for $69.00 and for a few dollars more you could get the templates. I thought it was a good deal but just couldn't swing it, maybe next time. If I got that thenI would have to get the bigger router to use the 1/2" bits. Over the years I've come to the conclusion, spend a few dollars more for the better stuff and you will have fewer headaches, you don't always need the best.

Madclicker
11-19-2005, 09:45 PM
I also like better stuff. I'm still stuck in the "at least 1 of everything" mode.

I stole a few hours from my yard work and paid some kids, so I was able to do some work on the torsion boxes.

The first pic shows the batch cut skeleton parts for the 2 sides, and top and bottom TB's.

The second shows the dryfit to confirm that my late night "Miller Lite Engineering" numbers work....YAHOO!. The gussets work as alignment and spacing setups, just as planned.

The third show the final small TB skeleton. The second on of these went much faster.

First TB's and I'm sure happy.

Steve

spalm
11-19-2005, 10:50 PM
So you got the frame and the TBoxes. Where you going with this? You got a plan we can watch?

Looks like a nice sliding table on the saw for cutoffs.
Steve

2muchstuff
11-20-2005, 12:10 AM
Is that MDF you are using for your boxes.

Madclicker
11-20-2005, 12:21 AM
Steve,

The Al table that I reworked is for making accurate torsion boxes and hopefully another, better machine.

I wish I had better cad skills, but the CU campus I studied at had few ME courses when I went there. I got a BSEE and did my grad work in control systems, specifically spacecraft control.

This record of my work will just be pictorial and written unless someone want's to volunteer help.

Madclicker
11-20-2005, 12:27 AM
2much,

Yes it is mdf. I love it except for the flour dust machining it creates.

2muchstuff
11-20-2005, 12:27 AM
You ought to be a whiz when it comes time to do the electrical end of things. I can see it now, a power supply/driver enclosure that resembles the space shuttle. All those little buttons, switches and lights.

I know what you mean about the dust, it gets everywhere. I have become a fan of Baltic Birch veneer plywood, partly because of the dust and that I get a fair amount of the plywood from my work. We get equipment shipped in from Europe and the crates are made out of the stuff. I have made base and upper cabinets for the utility room, my workshop and the garage.

Madclicker
11-20-2005, 09:32 PM
Steve,

That cross-cut sled is a workhorse. It's what made it possible to cut these 130+ pieces in a few hours.

2much,

Not gonna reinvent the wheel on the electronics...not even build the wheel from scratch. Did too much of that in college. I'm 90% set on gecko's and hope I can find some cheap servo's before I get to the point of having to buy them. You are somewhat right on the bells, whistles, buttons and lights. I'm designing a control panel that will send mach 2 keystroke shortcut to the comp with just a button push. Should be cool. I may also make a PS, but that's a trivial thing.

I stole time from production to start on the top TB. This will be the hardest one because it is topped with 3/4" mdf and needs to be routed for 6 t-tracks before I laminate it. The pic shows the skeleton. A pretty full day.

spalm
11-20-2005, 10:44 PM
Nice boxes. I love that look. Looks like you went with just mini ribs and not interlocking half laps. Saves a lot of work and I bet just as strong. Did you pin it or just glue?

I understand the CAD thing. But I am just wondering what you are planning for liner bearings.

Steve

Madclicker
11-20-2005, 11:24 PM
Steve,

I'm gonna use skate bearings on 2" EMT similar to what Gerry did. The pipe supports will be different and unique to anything I've seen anywhere i think.

Madclicker
11-20-2005, 11:27 PM
oh yea. I wanted to pin the box, but my nailer kept jamming, so i just globbed on the glue.

Madclicker
11-21-2005, 09:14 PM
More progress. The first pic shows the 1/4" skin I put on the bottom and the bolt access holes I cut. Also the jigs I made to cut them.

Since my brad nailer won't quit jamming I had to improvise on gluing the skins. Used gobs of glue and lots of weight. The second pic shows how I did it. Used all the heavy stuff in the shop and many clamps around the perimeter.

Not too bad for only a weeks work.

Madclicker
11-21-2005, 09:17 PM
Long day!

spalm
11-21-2005, 11:32 PM
Pattern cutting. Good man.

1/4"? looks like 1/2" from here, but all I got are your pics. Come on don't be a tease, where you going with this?

Steve

Madclicker
11-22-2005, 04:21 AM
Pattern cutting. Good man.

1/4"? looks like 1/2" from here, but all I got are your pics.

The bottom is skinned in 1/4"...the first pic. The second pic shows the glue-up of the 3/4" top skin.

Madclicker
11-22-2005, 04:23 AM
Come on don't be a tease, where you going with this?

Steve

Be patient weedhopper.

Madclicker
11-22-2005, 07:49 PM
Made a good buy on 3 SE nema 42 840 oz/in steppers last night. I'll put 2 on the X and the other on the Y. Z still up in the air.

Not much other progress. Trimmed the 3/4" skin on the TB but the bearing failed and I messed up about 3' of the edge before I noticed. Oh, well. 2 forward 1 back. MDF is easy to repair.

Madclicker
11-24-2005, 10:23 PM
Cut the grooves for the t-track on the main bed today. Also worked on seating and bedding the track. Will finish after I laminate and trim the grooves of the laminate.

Madclicker
11-26-2005, 08:54 PM
Got some more done today. Laminated top, bottom and sides. Top, bottom and 2 sides in p-lam. The sides that show I did in re-sawn red oak for the aesthetics. First pic is the bottom after gluing the oak panels, laminating 3 sides, and trimming edges and bolt access holes. 2nd is after laminating the top and trimming edges and t-track grooves. Also added red t-track to see how purdy it is gonna be......VERY!

This one piece is definitely the heavy lifting for the project.

My double secret oil blend really makes the red oak pop.

ViperTX
11-26-2005, 11:38 PM
Gotta commend you all.....you make some working machines from low-cost materials! CONGRATULATIONS! Just a fine example of ingenuity!

Madclicker
12-04-2005, 09:27 PM
I've purchased quite a bit of materials. I'm trying to get a handle on what this first project will end up costing. I'm posting my running total as it stands so far:

3/4" MDF $42
1/4" MDF $24
VT Laminate $44
NEMA 42 1125 oz/in stepper $25
NEMA 34 450 oz/in stepper $43
Red Oak $16
T-Track $70
UHMW PE $20
2" EMT $16
3/4" flange bearings $17
ACME rods and nuts $38
4 Heavy duty castors $17
3/4" MDF $27
2 X 1 X 1/8 AL channel $10
abec-7 skate & R8 ZZ bearings $44
*10A 4 axis drive $135* (contemplating...not purchased yet)
-----------------------------------
Total $453

2muchstuff
12-04-2005, 11:25 PM
Where did you find a 1125 oz/in stepper for $25. That was a steal. Also what kind of drive is it for $135, are there more.

Madclicker
12-05-2005, 10:01 PM
Actually I got 3 of these 4.2" motors for $73 delivered off ebay. They were called "pulled from working mill" and very grungy. I'll clean them up, paint them and keep my fingers crossed. The shafts turn smoothly and I can feel the detents.

This is the link to the drive site:

http://dtllc.com/

p38nut uses this drive and swears by it and the guy that makes and sells them. My major reservation is that from the pics it looks like there is no optical isolation onboard. I think that if I'm careful with the wiring before I flip the switch this will not be an issue. Also, it's a unipolar drive, but I can live with that because I have these gorilla motors. The feature I like best about the drive is that it supplys 10A and my 4.2's can use 9.1A of that.

I think I'm going back to my original plan of using 2 of the 4.2's on the X, 1 on the Y and use the 3.4 on the Z. New cost sheet:

3/4" MDF $69
1/4" MDF $24
VT Laminate $44
3 NEMA 42 1125 oz/in steppers $73
NEMA 34 450 oz/in stepper $43
Red Oak $16
T-Track $70
UHMW PE $20
2" EMT $16
2 5/8" flange bearings
5/8" ACME rod and nuts
6 3/4" flange bearings $49
3/4" ACME rods and nuts $38
4 Heavy duty castors $17
2 X 1 X 1/8 AL channel $10
abec-7 skate & R8 ZZ bearings $44
*10A 4 axis drive $135* (contemplating...not purchased yet)
-----------------------------------
Total $668 (includes drive price)

I originally wanted this project to come in under $600....oh, well. Maybe $850 or less.

2muchstuff
12-05-2005, 11:40 PM
I'll say this again, you stole those steppers. What luck. I checked out the drive site and I like the 10 and 15 amp ratings but I need something that is good up to about 60 volts in a bipolar chopper. It keeps looking more and more like Gecko's all the time. I know what you mean about trying to keep costs down. I must be my own government, cost over-runs are running rampid.

jeffs555
12-06-2005, 12:32 AM
Using that drive may not be as economical as you think. I dont know what voltage rating your steppers have, or what power supply voltage you plan to use, but be aware that using those drives you are going to need at least 8 massive power resistors to handle 4 motors at 9 amps. For example, if your motors are rated at 3 volts and 9 amps, and you use a 12 volt power supply, the resistors will have to handle 72 watts each, probably 100watt resistors to be safe. These will cost between $7 to $12 each. In the winter you may save some money, because it will probably heat your whole shop. :)
Also, you will need a massive power supply. You will need 18 amps per motor, or nearly 80 amps for 4 motors.

It probably wouldn't be that much more, and might even be cheaper to get some Geko drives, which won't need power resistors, and will also have microstepping to help eliminate resonance. They will only handle 7 amps, but running bipolar series, would require only 4.5 amps to get the same torque as 9 amps unipolar. Also, using chopper drives, the power supply can be much smaller and cheaper. A resistor drive needs the power supply to handle the full motor current, but with a chopper drive and a higher voltage supply, the average current required will be much less than the rated motor current.

2muchstuff
12-06-2005, 10:17 PM
Resistors are the reason for going with the chopper type of drive. I just can't see spending all that money on resistors and transformer to watch it all go up in heat. I want to build a power supply/driver not a glorified over priced shop heater.

The motors that I have are 34 frame, 2.3 volt, 5.5 amp, 450 oz/in, 4wire. I would have swore that they were 690 oz/in motors but I guess not. It had been a while since I last looked at them. Due to the size of the router that this thing has grown to be, I will more than likely have to get bigger motors. I'm guessing that both the x and y motors will have to be alike because of the circular interpolation that I will be doing. Unless software will compansate for that which I don't know. I haven't even thought about software yet, I'm still working on the mechanicals.

Madclicker
12-07-2005, 12:27 AM
Jeff,

9 x 9 = 72?.... -10

I always try to approach projects from a systems (I'm a systems engineer) standpoint. Some things I have to use (the motors) and some things I have choices on. I think there are two very real design mistakes you made in your argument against this drive:

1. You seem to have arbitrarily chosen 12V PS's?

2. You have completely ignored the FET SD resistance.

Let's forget the FET resistance for now and go with your original premise. If I were to choose or build a 5V PS I would need to drop 2V across a power resistor. 18 watts. BTW, I found a 5V 150A PS today for $70.

BUT, the FET resistance matters (many blisters confirm). FET's typically have an 'on' resistance of 1 to 2 ohms in their working envelope. The resistance varies somewhat linearly with temperature. Of course, temperature increases with current. Taking the best case (1 ohm), your 12V PS would drop 9V across the FET and no additional ballast would be needed. Worst case, at 2 or so ohms, the 12V PS wouldn't power the motor to it's capacity. You would want more voltage!

I don't know what FET's are used on this driver, but Ill sure find out before I make my decision.

mdreitzusa
12-07-2005, 05:19 AM
very nice looking machine.looks good enough to use as living room furniture.
as a systems engineer the controls shound be a wiz.cann't wait to see that conrtol panal that you mentioned.
keep up the good work.

p38nut
12-07-2005, 07:57 AM
You are right, I really like this board for my application. I bought the 6 2 ohm 100 watt resistors for $6 bucks each from www.mouser.com. I also used 2 ATX computer power supplies, purchased from the local computer store, at $29 each. The total is 44 amps at 12v available. My steppers were 4.6 amps at 1.2v. Using the resistors has something to do with getting the best response and torque from the steppers. The on board enable relay and Mach2 shut down the PS's at the end of program. Some of this is technically beyond me. However, I do know one thing, it works, and keeps my garage warm at the same time.
Madclicker, if you have any questions, call Dave direct. He's easy to talk to, and knowledgeable about his product and the cnc craft.
Thanks. Mike

Madclicker
12-07-2005, 10:58 PM
md,

Here is a link to the site that has a slick board that can be programmed to provide KB shortcut sequences with single button pushes.

I still need to find arcade style button switches.

Madclicker
12-07-2005, 11:01 PM
gosh, missed the link:

http://www.ultimarc.com/

ger21
12-07-2005, 11:19 PM
I still need to find arcade style button switches.

Ultimarc sells them. Check here too. http://www.happcontrols.com/pushbuttons/pushbuttons.htm

spalm
12-08-2005, 12:05 AM
Mr Clicker, this is not my area of expertise and you seem confident of your conclusions on FET drivers, but…

I have not designed a motor controller or used many high power FETs, but have designed many switching power regulators and have never come across a FET with 1 or 2 ohms of resistance. Take a common example of the IRLZ44 MOSFET that I see in many hobby controllers. It has a RDS(on) resistance of .04 ohms. Even if it is normalized for temp, at 150C it is still only .07 ohms, and that is hot!

Now, I live in a world were efficiency is king, and heat is a bad word. So I would naturally tend towards a constant current PWM type solution.

IMHO,
Steve

mdreitzusa
12-08-2005, 04:25 AM
thanks for the link
it could be fun to see how far this control can go.with the option of buttons,trackballs,joysticks and opical switches all on the same machine.have you looked at
http://www.futurlec.com/DevelopmentBoards.shtml
they have development board and control boards designed as modules.if you wanted to make an embedded system.

jeffs555
12-08-2005, 06:36 AM
Madclicker,
I was only trying to be helpful. I am an electrical engineer, and have designed motor controllers, and Steve is right about the on resistance of modern N-channel mosfets. For a board like that to handle 15 amps, I would guess the on resistance is closer to 0.01 ohm. At 15 amps, a mosfet with 1 ohm of on resistance would be dissipating 225 watts, and the whole board would be dissipating 1.8 kW, and would be a molten lump.

The main reason for using a higher voltage power supply is to allow the steppers to achieve reasonable rpms. If you look at the torque curves for most stepper motors, they are all specified with supply voltages of 24v or 36v or higher. Still don't know what model your motors are, or what voltage they are rated, but running a 3 volt motor with a 5 volt suppy, the torque at more than a couple hundred rpm would be very limited. Even a 12 volt supply is usually marginal. Your motors may be so overrated for your application that you can get away with it, but you will be spending a lot on the drives and power supply, so you might want to check the specs and do some calculations to make sure they will work for you.

Jeff

Ok, so I am getting old and can't even multiply 9x9 without a calculator. So 81 watts is even worse.

Madclicker
12-08-2005, 11:44 PM
I appreciate any help I can get. I'm in absolutely uncharted waters here. If I question things that are said it doesn't mean I think what you are saying is wrong. I've done bunches with DC servo's, but this is my first exposure to steppers. I would use servo's, but they are so expensive...even used. Which brings me to why I'm looking at this drive board as opposed to buying 4 Gecko's. If I can use this board I would save $350 or so.

I threw away my data books a long time ago and googled "power fet data" or something like that to get the numbers i quoted. The guy that makes these boards got back to me and told me the source-drain R is about .1 OHMS. That would give a drop of .91V. My big motors are rated at 2.1V, so I see I would need to drop about 2V across a ballast if I used a 5V supply. 18W. Which brings me to my next question:

Why would using a larger supply voltage increase rpm's when what you're really doing is just dropping the extra V across a resistor and making waste heat? I'm an electical engineer also and might understand a technical answer.

jeffs555
12-09-2005, 10:27 AM
Steve,
The main thing that limits the stepping speed is the inductance of the windings. Each coil inside the motor is equivalent to an inductor in series with a resistor. Current through an inductor cannot change instantaneously. When you apply a step pulse to the driver, and it switches the current to the coils, it takes a finite amount of time for the current to change. The rate at which the current will change is equal to the applied voltage divided by the inductance, so the higher the applied voltage, the faster the current reaches the rated current. For example, if the coil inductance was 1mH which would be typical, and you applied 2 volts to the coil, it would take at least 4.5 mS to reach 9 amps. For a 200 step motor, 4.5mS is only around 67rpm.


With a chopper type drive, the full supply voltage is applied to the coil until the current reaches the set value, and then the voltage is switched on and off to maintain the set current. Since the full supply voltage is being applied to the motor, it is easy to see that the higher the supply voltage, the faster the motor will reach the desired current.

On a unipolar drive with series resistors, when you switch the voltage to a coil to step the motor, the current initially starts out at zero and ramps up. Since the current is zero, the voltage drop across the series resistors is zero, and the coil initially sees the full supply voltage. As the current ramps up, the voltage drop across the series resistor increases, so the coil sees the applied voltage decrease as the current ramps up, but for most of the ramp up period the voltage across the coil is much higer than the rated voltage, so the current does ramp up faster.

It is generally accepted that for good performance, the supply voltage should be around 10 or more times the rated voltage of the motor.

Jeff

PS I would question the cooling requirements for a drive that claimed to handle 15amps, and used .1 ohm mosfets. At 15amps, that would be 22.5 watts for one mosfet, which is an awful lot for one small device to dissipate. It would take some major cooling to keep from burning it up.

Madclicker
12-09-2005, 11:38 AM
Jeff,

Thanks a lot! That clears it up completely. I was sure you were talking about the dynamics of the motor, but I don't know why it wasn't obvious to me sooner. Been a long time since my circuits courses. What did they call that? "unit step response"? (chair)

Damn, I was sure hoping I had found a cheaper solution. I can't dump that much heat into my shop. Not even in the winter. I have 2 window AC's going out there right now.

Madclicker
12-09-2005, 10:30 PM
I finally tracked down the specs on my big motors. Looks like the good news about using them as bipolar's is that now they are 1390 oz/in with a 6.5A spec...thanks again Jeff. Gecko's are definitley in order.

I got the motors somewhat cleaned up and painted...sure look better. I'll do more work on the base this we.

Madclicker
12-17-2005, 10:23 PM
Well, I finally found (stole) some time to make some progress. I drilled the bed for the connecting and pipe support bolts and made a place in my small shop for the machine....saw horses for now. Also made and drilled the pipe support AL channel. This is really the way to go for supporting black pipe or emt. The first pic shows how I bolted it to the bed. The second pic shows my initial fitting of the emt. It is long because my initial thought was that it needed to be supported on the ends....holes through the end sections with maybe uhmwpe adjusting thingies. I only drilled the center mounting hole and after bolting it up for a trial fit could not believe the rigidity. Now, I've decided to cut the pipe ends and do away with the end support I had planned. The 3 support channels and bolts to the bed will be more than enough support.

Madclicker
12-21-2005, 11:06 PM
Been distracted with business and also bought a nice HF 2 hp dust collector. If anyone cares, I found a good trick, HF honors both catalog prices and web advertised prices. The best price on my dust collector, web or local flyer, was 169.99. The catelog they sent me listed it as $159.99. I printed out this page and got this price at the register.

I'm on the HF email list and get a 20% discount coupon every week. That makes my dust collector cost me $128 + tax. This does and doesn't suck. I am happy.

The first pic is after i assembled it. The second is after parking it in it's home and hooking it up. In the second pic you can see the separator I made from a salvaged 55 gal hardboard barrel and 2 4" angled dust ports...about $10.

Also note my new $29.88 recon 2hp 1/2" VS router. A very good day. I have 7 routers now...the one with the most routers when he dies wins!

Madclicker
01-13-2006, 09:41 PM
Made the front, back and legs. The front and back are double thick MDF banded in red oak and laminated both sides for stability and equilibrium. The legs are just 3 2x4's glued long grain with heavy duty cast iron/hard rubber castors.

This thing is really heavy. I had to use my big floor jack to get it off the horses onto the legs.

Madclicker
01-14-2006, 12:45 AM
Finished laminating and cutting the access holes for the lower torsion boxes.

Madclicker
01-14-2006, 10:27 PM
Glued up the gantry tosion box skeleton today. Can't believe how ridgid this is already, even without being skinned yet. Used 3/4 MDF on the outer hard points and 1/4 MDF for the inner ribs. Will use pipe supports placed every other segment, so I may drill lightening holes in between them in the top and bottom 3/4 MDF. Will be skinned in 1/8 masonite and phenolic laminate. Of course, the upper surface that will show will be banded in resawn red oak. Shop made doesn't have to look homemade.

Madclicker
01-15-2006, 11:03 PM
I mocked the gantry today.

The 1st pic is bearings and angle trucks I made. Not much different from others before me except I used 1/8X1.25 steel angle and R8 ZZ bearings. 1/2" bolts and 3/8" close brass nipples were a near perfect match to position the flats of the bearing to tangents of the pipe. Everything of the shelf. Skate bearings on the main axis were never really an option, not so much because of the bearings but more for the whimpy 5/16 bolts that carry them.

The second pic is the gantry mock on the table rails. I couldn't be happier. After tightening the lower allthread the thing glided very nicely. I'm sure the mock gantry sides are way too tall, but I did that on purpose for experimental reasons. I'm sure the final will be much shorter. The last thing I want is a gorilla gantry. Lots of side to side flex at this point, but not unexpected with mock sides and an unfinished TB. I'm starting to think this could be driven from the center with an under table TB with good results. I just may do this.

Madclicker
01-16-2006, 10:59 PM
I skinned the upper gantry TB and was frustrated with the progress. First the skeleton wasn't straight...first couple of pics. I used a stick of 3" square al tube to clamp it into place while gluing. This did make it straight. My pipe support design lends itself well to shimming for precise pipe placement, but 3/16" or so was too much.

The next problem was that after glue-up the thing was out of square. I fixed this on the table saw with my crosscut sled. I'll add some masonite on the ends to make up for removed material before I finally band it in red oak and laminate it.

The last pic shows the new gantry mock. I lowered the mock sides 2.5" to accommodate the planned lower gantry TB.

Madclicker
01-18-2006, 10:28 PM
Worked on the lower gantry TB today. The first pic shows the skeleton. I got sloppy with the alignment of the ribs and concentrated on getting the box straight and square this time.

The second pic shows the box skinned with masonite and the bolt clearance holes cut.

Third pic is the box clamped in place (sorta). This really made the gantry structure much more rigid. Before I added the lower gantry TB I could manually excite the first flexible mode. The structure pole/zero pair appeared to be as low as 2 or 3 hz. After adding the lower gantry TB I could not shake the gantry fast enough to excite the first flexible mode. It will get even more rigid when I get everything finished, laminated and bolted solid. Looking like 1 big motor in the center will drive the gantry to serve my needs.

The last pic is my latest ebay buy. For $32 delivered I got a treadmill walk belt. I think it will make a great shop made motorized drum sander feed table.

2muchstuff
01-19-2006, 08:59 AM
Now all you need are the drums and bearings to run the belt around. Check with fitness equipment dealers they usually throw away the older models of treadmills when a fitness club buys new ones. It would be a great source of parts.

There was such a dealer near my work that did just that and there would be on average about 2-3 treadmills a week in the trash.

jmytyk
01-19-2006, 10:14 PM
I noticed that you drilled holes through your x-axis pipes. How is this working out for you? It doesn't appear to be under power yet, but just sliding it along by hand. Do you think the holes will weaken the pipe at all? Would it deform around those holes? The pipes sit in channel, the channel is bolted to the TB? Pipe bolted through the channel? -looking good... keep it up.



_Jon

Madclicker
01-19-2006, 11:21 PM
I don't see any problem with even the gorilla holes I had to drill for the cap screws. If I do later I will switch to socketheads....much smaller hole. I will use socketheads for the y axis because I want to use much smaller pipe (maybe EMT, maybe not). You got the rest right. I think it is a very good way to support the pipe.

Madclicker
01-19-2006, 11:32 PM
Now all you need are the drums and bearings to run the belt around. Check with fitness equipment dealers they usually throw away the older models of treadmills when a fitness club buys new ones. It would be a great source of parts.

There was such a dealer near my work that did just that and there would be on average about 2-3 treadmills a week in the trash.

Never thought of that source. I checked the phone book and not a single wholesale fitness eq seller. Guess mid Florida is not so athletic. Lots of motor wheelchair dealers....maybe I'll dive those dumpsters!

mdreitzusa
01-20-2006, 02:34 AM
you could try goodwill or the salvation army.my folks hauled one to goodwill before i found out that i could have used the motors on my lathe.it might be a place to check out.

Madclicker
01-30-2006, 09:21 PM
My cabinet supply shop gave me a microwave today. It was working, but arced inside. For 10 mins work I salvaged the transformer, a 120v squirrel fan and 3 limit switches. There were 4 switches, but I broke 1.

Madclicker
02-22-2006, 12:08 AM
Got some magnetic wire today. Since my last post I scarfed and scrapped another microwave. This one was newer and smaller and had a smaller trannie. Between the two along with 2 or 3 bridges and some caps from ebay I'll have a gorilla PS that will power my whole machine for a shoestring.

posix
02-22-2006, 02:27 AM
steve one question if I may!

if you've gone through all that trouble of creating torsion boxes first time round why didn't you then go the extra mile and do the same for gantry supports? they too would benefit from being torsion boxes themselves instead of just slabs of mdf. might as well do it while you're at it? ;)

keep up the good work!

Madclicker
02-22-2006, 02:56 AM
steve one question if I may!

if you've gone through all that trouble of creating torsion boxes first time round why didn't you then go the extra mile and do the same for gantry supports? they too would benefit from being torsion boxes themselves instead of just slabs of mdf. might as well do it while you're at it? ;)

keep up the good work!

posix, you are right on track with the torsion box gantry upright thing! Scroll back a bit and you'll see where I was just "mocking" the gantry uprights. As much as I try to "engineer" and get all measurements exact, it just doesn't happen in real life. I needed to check before I commited to gantry upright dimensions. I also had to modify the torsion box lengths.

But, feeling good about making this work.

WhiteTiger
02-22-2006, 11:46 AM
What a gem of a thread :) Page 4 could almost be excerpted and posted as a basic FAQ for stepper electrics. Nice to see such material gathered in one place... sure wish I'd had some such concise source way back when I was trying to learn this stuff LOL

This place is a goldmine of entertaining info.



Tiger

Madclicker
02-22-2006, 11:16 PM
I've decided to try to get some demonstrable work done on this project every day if possible.

The first pic is the result of trying to lighten the upper gantry torsion box. Don't know how successful I was because I didn't weigh it before, but I know I made a crap load of chips and ended up with a sore shoulder.

The second pic shows the upper gantry TB after cutting the pipe support bolt access holes. It weighed 10 lbs at this point.

ger21
02-23-2006, 07:48 AM
If you want a lighter torsion box, it's best to lighten the internal framework and use thinner skins. The skins give it it's strength, so cutting holes in the skins will weaken it.

Madclicker
02-24-2006, 02:14 AM
If you want a lighter torsion box, it's best to lighten the internal framework and use thinner skins. The skins give it it's strength, so cutting holes in the skins will weaken it.

I did use use lighter internal ribs than most do...1/4" MDF. I also used 1/8" tempered hardboard for the skins...don't think you can get much thinner without going to sheetmetal (or paper ;) ).

I didn't cut any holes in the skin to lighten the structure. The lightening holes I cut were in the top and bottom hard edge that's 3/4" MDF. This was to be the connecting hard points for the top and bottom pipes. These holes are actually "skinned" over with red oak now....pic 1. The holes I cut in the skins were for bolt access. I have changed my design and will use through allthread to attach the pipes and supports. I was shy of this because of all the use I've seen of this stuff to tie gantry sides together and replace lower gantry TB's. Never considered this good design. I think it will be OK to mount the pipes like this, though.

I have laminated over the old holes and you can see this in pic 2. Only the bolt hard points to the gantry uprights have access holes now.

Had to include a 3rd pic to show how the red oak pops with my magic oil. :)

Madclicker
02-25-2006, 12:51 AM
Didn't get much done today....had to go to wally world to resupply the fort.

Only pic shows reassembled gantry mock, this time with completed upper and lower TB's. When I have the Z trolley figured out I'll be able to determine the geometry of the gantry uprights.

Tomorrow I hope to mount the Y pipes and supports, then the construction of the Z will begin.

Do I see a light at the end of that tunnel?

Madclicker
02-27-2006, 10:53 PM
Chisled out the HV coils of one of my trannies...the largest. Didn't mess up the insulating paper too bad getting the coil out, but the flux shunts were stubborn. Pic 1. You can see the mangled shunts and paper.

I wrapped 10 coils of 10 ga insulated wire in the secondary hole to test what the ratio was and got 9.24 Vrms. Second pic. I now think there is enough room to just rewind the secondary with the 10ga insulated wire and save the magnet wire for another project.

Madclicker
03-02-2006, 11:21 PM
I'm shooting for a 60Vdc supply. Unless I'm wrong(and tell me if I am!):

((DCVout + Vdd)/1.414)/Vsw = #SecWinds

Where:

Vdd = V diode drop across the bridge (1.2V)

Vsw = Vrms of single tested secondary winding

Should give me a close count of the secondary windings needed?

Madclicker
03-04-2006, 11:03 PM
Got my can caps today. Huge 60,000uf 75v Beasts.....but only $7 each delivered.

This motivated me to finish winding the secondary of my microwave tranny. Ended up with an output that was about 62V peak-peak. Should give me ~60Vdc supply with ample current.

Only parts left on the PS are the cap mounts and rectifier bridge.

pic follows.

ZipSnipe
03-04-2006, 11:37 PM
Need to get ya shop boy and clean up that shop... Just jokin looks like my shop

randyf1965
03-05-2006, 08:23 AM
[QUOTE=Madclicker]Got my can caps today. Huge 60,000uf 75v Beasts.....but only $7 each delivered.


Where did you get those caps?

Madclicker
03-05-2006, 09:10 PM
Got the caps on ebay. Paid an extra $5 for the buy-it-now because I didn't want to miss out. Got 5, but one got dented in shipment. I'll probably resell the one's I don't use back on ebay.

Madclicker
03-07-2006, 12:44 AM
Updated my expenditures:

3/4" MDF $83
1/4" MDF $24
Tempered Masonite $15
VT Laminate $69
NEMA 42 1390 oz/in stepper $25
NEMA 34 630 oz/in stepper $43
NEMA 34 400 oz/in stepper $24
Lovejoy's $15
Red Oak $30
T-Track $70
UHMW PE $10
2" EMT $16
Gas Pipe $10
4 5/8" flange bearings $30
2 3/4" flange bearings $15
5/8" ACME rods $20
3/4" ACME rod $13
4 Heavy duty castors $17
2 X 1 X 1/8 AL channel $10
abec-7 skate & R8 ZZ bearings $44
Can Cap $7
Cap Mounts $5
Rectifier Bridge $5
Magnet Wire $10
Misc. Hardware $50
3 Gecko's $400 (tentative)
-----------------------------------
Total $OMG

2muchstuff
03-07-2006, 12:10 PM
I got my 5- 60,000uf 75 volt 95 surge caps from a guy on ebay for $20. I missed the auction, starting bid was $15 with a buy now for $25. Contacted him and got them with horizontal clamps for $20. Not too bad for someone who put the caps in the wrong section on ebay.

madclicker,

It doesn't seem like a lot of money when you nickel and dime it here and there but when you add it up in the end, -OUCH-.

Madclicker
03-07-2006, 09:55 PM
Sounds like the same caps and maybe the same seller. Great deal!

So far, the nickle and dime approach has worked well. No big hits to the wallet. I will take a big breath and a big hit to the wallet soon when I have to buy the drives.

Got my lovejoys today. Pic follows.

2muchstuff
03-08-2006, 12:01 AM
The guy that I got my caps from is north of Kansas City, Mo. He said that they were pulled from a 48 volt power supply used for telecommunications. The caps are made by Lorain. I'd take a picture of them but the camera battery is dead and the charger has grown feet.

Madclicker
03-23-2006, 11:12 PM
Gathered a few things together today. Gonna have to build a control cabinet soon....hate the prices of off the shelf. Time to start pulling this thing together.

Got my BOB a while back but had to order a gender changer for it to work. Was sure I had one around here...but not. The parallel cable is old stock and I consider it a freebee.

I built the computer from back up stuff. Just a 266P2. Will run turbocnc fine from what I understand. The 15" lcd monitor was a gift from my brother. I will build an enclosure for the "brains" as soon as I get the machine earning it's living. Plan on 2 joysticks for X, Y, Z, and A. Paid $10 for a new HP opt mouse. Still need a KB and wireless net card.

Found 2 old P1 heatsink/fans and 1 heatsink that I had robbed the fan from. Gonna try to make these into a cooling system for the geckos. Just hope I can find 1 of the dozen tubes of heatsink grease I know I have.

As I said before I have rewound a huge microwave trannie and obtained big caps for the PS. Gotta order a big rectifier bridge soon. I also found a small switching PS from my college days and it still works. Will supply my 5V and 12V.

JohnnyYuma
03-25-2006, 07:28 PM
Vary Vary nice Build, Keep it coming

Madclicker
03-25-2006, 08:00 PM
Got a little more done today on the gantry. Got the 1.25" EMT mounted with 5/16" all thread through top to bottom. Cut the all thread a little long. I think I will replace the nuts I used with nylocks and then cut the bolts flush with a die grinder. The pipe supports are 7/8" al channel...looks good to me!

Madclicker
04-05-2006, 10:20 PM
Worked on the drive box today. Gonna use an old AT case I found while dumpster diving for shipping materials. A cold chisel made short work of removing the drive cage and PS shelf. The original PS was toast or I would have just used it for the 5V and 12V I needed. Since it was, I took the cover off and used a grinder to separate the back that contains the fan and power sockets from the electronics. I screwed this back into the inside of the case. This can be seen in the first pic.

My gorilla tranny just barely fits in the case. Pic 2.

I made horizontal cap mounts from 2" Al channel and cable ties. Pic 3.

I was able to mount my BOB to one of the card slot thingies. Had to use a dremel and sanding drum to trim the PCB of the BOB to make it happen, but it was simple. Pic4.

Madclicker
04-08-2006, 08:09 PM
I worked on the gantry trolley yesterday and today. My intention was to just build a prototype from 1/2" MDF and after I worked out the bugs make the real trolley out of 1/2 baltic birch. I've been saving 1/3 sheet just for this. Because this was intended to be temporary I just butt glued the joints together. I would use proper dado joints on the real one....but. The thing is so strong, square, accurate and glides so well on the Y pipes that I'll probably use it for at least a while unless I really mess up the Z axis. Hope I can put a decent finish on it. Pic 1.

I received my bridge rectifier yesterday, so I can finish the power supply. I'm also on the verge of ordering the geckos, so I started gathering up the wire I have around. Pic 2.

Madclicker
04-16-2006, 07:28 PM
Made some lead nuts from steel nuts and MDF. These were just down and dirty hacks to get me going. There was a link somewhere that showed how much more efficient plastic nuts were than steel on steel. Something like 30-50%. Can't remember who posted it or where.Pics 1, 2 and 3 show the construction. Self explanitory. Used yellow glue on the MDF and a couple dabs of JB to hold the nut secure. Made 2 5/8" and 2 3/4". I absolutely had my gantry carriage and will make nuts from UHMWPE when I redesign it.

I turned the ends of 2 of the screws to fit lovejoys and also made taps for future use on the plastic nuts. Mounted 2 flange bearings on MDF drops and clamped them to my assembly table. Used my 3/4" drill motor to power my "lathe" on one end and "turned" the other end with a small angle grinder, Pic 4. Pic 5 shows the rough tap I made. Just have to use the die grinder and cut-off wheel to make cutting grooves. Pic 6 shows one turned end and pic 7 shows the mounted lovejoy after I ground a flat.

The last 3 pics show the new router table I built for my table saw wing. It replaces the first I built that was 48" and just way too big. Sometimes distractions are a good thing.

I've actually done much more...just don't have pics yet. Gonna order the Geckos tonight and I think I have everything to get this albatross flying very soon.

spalm
04-16-2006, 09:04 PM
Looking good, Steve.

I see that you mentioned that you are just using the nuts until you can tap your own. It isn’t just efficiency; my hand tapped nuts fit pretty tight and did not show as much backlash as when I had tried to use standard metal nuts. Depends on your nuts, I ‘spose.

Just a thought.
Steve

Madclicker
04-18-2006, 11:46 PM
Steve,

I have to look back and see how you made your nuts before I make mine. They look like they are spring loaded? Maybe I missed it in one of your other builds. I also have questions about the v-bearings. I'll post to your log for the record.

Working on the z axis. Pics 1, 2 and 3 shows my attempt at layout with real parts. Used scraps to spread the angles and bearings to get close measurements. I mounted the pipes with u-bolts. The slop in the holes will allow fore and aft adjustment before tightening. I can shim the pipes to remove slop from the bearings.

I made 3 motor mounts from 4" X 1/8" square Al tube. Cut on table saw with crosscut sled.

The last pic shows the new Hitachi M12VC router I'll use as a spindle. Also, the mount I made from triple stacked 3/4" MDF.

Ordered the Geckos today.....whew!

Madclicker
04-27-2006, 11:58 PM
Well, I finally have movement. All these pics show the setup to test the new Geckos on the Z axis. First I mounted them to 3" angle with blown heatsinks. Pics 1 and 2. The next 2 pics are the control box. First the inside stuff getting bolted down and then the back where you can see I substituted another Vin socket for the old monitor plug. Also installed a power cord for the spindle. I'm using 2 power in sockets because one will be dedicated to spindle power. Later I'll finish the relay board to control the spindle power from software. The board is actually done and you can see it in pics 1 and 2, but I don't want to mess with it right now. The last 2 pics are the Z axis and an overview of the whole check out setup.

Everything went well. I had one glitch at first because the 5V line was touching the signal ground. Bad placement of the jumper strips on the barrier strip. No harm done.

I started tweaking Turbocnc to try to get the speeds up and was disappointed in the results. At first I could only get 75 IPM. For some reason I bought 8 TPI screws. I don't know what I was thinking.....it was a long time ago. I messed with the accel and was able to get about 100 IPM. Just switching to 6 TPI screws will give me ~33% more speed. I may do that later, but the more I think about it, the more I think a solid 50-60 IPM on the Z will be more than adequate. Anything more is icing on the cake.

I made a stupid little video, but geesh it's 14mb for only 1.5 minutes of (boring) up and down movement.

Next I will make the X axis move. This is what I'm calling the motor/screw that moves the Z back and forth on the gantry.

When the X flies I'll break it down for paint and final design and construction of the gantry uprights.

Banana time! :banana:

Madclicker
04-29-2006, 07:51 PM
I tweaked the config values in TCNC and was able to obtain reliable 130 IPM rapids for the Z axis. Kinda fun to watch, but far from what I want.

I got the X axis moving. The pic shows the motor mounted on my gantry, still using the mocked uprights.

I used what I had learned from tweaking the Z to make shorter work of this axis and my big surprise was that this axis also has a ceiling of 130 IPM! After visiting the TCNC forum here I found that my computer is the weak link on both of these axes. It's only a 266P2 and TCNC reports a 10% jitter point of 26.4KHz. To get the 130 IPM I am using a max vel of 35KHz. I'm surprised I'm not losing steps there even without a load. I'm sure I'll have to slow the rapids down a bit when I mount the spindle. The *very* good news is that it's the dino box that's creating the ceiling right now. Later I'll buy a faster box and who knows how fast I can get it to go then.

Now that these 2 axes are working, I'm gonna take it apart for paint (geez, I hate painted MDF). When I reassemble it I'll do it with the permanent gantry uprights I'm building now ( No paint on these!).

Madclicker
05-04-2006, 12:07 AM
Tweaked TCNC more and was able to get 200 ipm on the X and 190 ipm on the Z. Getting closer.

Finished the gantry uprights tonight. Pic 1 shows the 4 1/4" MDF skins clamped together to be belt sanded till very closely matched. Pic 2 shows the 4 separate skins. Pic 4 shows the torsion box innards. Skeleton made from 1/4" and 1/2" MDF. 1/2" on the hard bolting points and perimeter. Finally pic 4 shows result after edge banding in oak, laminating and applying magic oil.

Hope for some production this weekend.

(Pics in wrong order, but you get it)

ShayArnett
05-04-2006, 10:07 AM
Looks like squished sandwich bread. I LOVE IT !!!!!

[edit] What is your magic oil?

spalm
05-04-2006, 10:48 PM
Mr. Clicker,
Very smart indeed. Nice workmanship.

As Shay mentioned, it is time to fess up on your magic oil.

Did you cut the edge banding yourself? Bandsaw –> thickness planer style?

Impressive speed during testing. Do you feel that it is smooth at that rate?

Steve

Madclicker
05-06-2006, 07:55 PM
Mr. Clicker,
Very smart indeed. Nice workmanship.

As Shay mentioned, it is time to fess up on your magic oil.

Did you cut the edge banding yourself? Bandsaw –> thickness planer style?

Impressive speed during testing. Do you feel that it is smooth at that rate?

Steve

Steve,

Thanks. The oil is just a blend of tung oil, teak oil, boiled linseed oil, and urethane....equal parts. If you can't get teak oil the other three work well also. Developed the 'recipe' 25 yrs ago when I made money turning used furniture into antiques.

The edge banding was resawn from 3/4 stock and run through the planer.

Lots of vibrations in the first tests, but the gantry was just sitting on the table. Fixed much of it already, but don't know how the real setup will shake out. We'll see.

Working hard and late tonight to try to get this thing cutting wood tomorrow. The first pic is the pretty much complete control box. Got the last Gecko wired and working with no problems. It is configured for the 4.2" motor on the main axis. Spun the motor very nicely.

The second pic is the 2 3.4 motors, mounts, heatsinks, and bearing assemblies during a dry fit. Pic 3 shows the 4.2" motor and an adapter plate I had to make from 3/8" Al stock to get it to fit the mount. The last pic is all 3 assemblies bolted up tight with heatsink grease....ready for action. I put my new Hitachi router motor in the pic for reference.

Madclicker
05-11-2006, 10:36 PM
I finally started cutting wood. The pics show the machine as it is now and some of the play cuts I made on some drops a couple days ago when I first got it running.

From the beginning I could cut at 200 ipm on all axes with no missed steps. However, this led to my first lesson in diy cnc. Just because you have the power to push a cutter fast doesn't mean the machine is ridgid enough to hold it where it should be. The quality of the cuts really sucked. The biggest problem is in the Z axis assembly. I knew it was crap when I built it, but was in a hurry. I'll redo it sometime later. For now I slowed the cut speed down to 100 ipm and was able to turn out production quality stuff yesterday and today. So strange to have the cash flow going the other direction for a change! I haven't even been to the hardware store in 3 days!

I bought 12' of Igus cable chain for $37 delivered from a zone user and got it last week. The 4" wide stuff may be more than I need, but it will sure add a big hit of cool to my machine.

A big priority is to get my dust collector plumbed to this thing. In 2 days I have hauled 5-5 gallon buckets out of the shop.

THIS IS JUST TOO COOL!!!

rpage
05-11-2006, 10:58 PM
Congrats! That has got to be an awesome feeling!

Mine DIY is slow going at the moment. Has something to do with money in money out. Seems I need more money in at the moment :)

5 5 gallon buckets, holy cow! LOL I need to post this message before my wife comes over and reads the 5 5 gallon bucket part :)

Again conrgats!

paulC
05-11-2006, 11:07 PM
Well done.
Like the way you integrated the cable management with an illumination system. :rolleyes:
Just kidding. Great work.
Paul

spalm
05-12-2006, 12:17 AM
Yea Clicker, quite the adventure, huh?

100 ipm is good cutting, don’t be disheartened.

It you turn off the router and drive the Z into the table, do you see the Y carriage rock back? This was a problem that I had, but maybe your beefed up design cured that.

Not to discourage, but congrats. I want to redesign my Z also. Maybe we can share thoughts.

Steve

Jason Marsha
05-12-2006, 10:20 AM
Good work, where is the cutting video. :D

Jason

Madclicker
05-24-2006, 12:11 AM
Yea Clicker, quite the adventure, huh?

100 ipm is good cutting, don’t be disheartened.

It you turn off the router and drive the Z into the table, do you see the Y carriage rock back? This was a problem that I had, but maybe your beefed up design cured that.

Not to discourage, but congrats. I want to redesign my Z also. Maybe we can share thoughts.

Steve

After a little research I guess I've decided 100 ipm is pretty good using acme screws. I've also slowed many cuts way down from that to get the precision I want.

The Y carriage is very ridgid. If it becomes not so I'll switch to the v-bearings you used. I would have earlier, but I was commited before I saw what you were doing.

Nearly 100% of my immediate problems were in the Z axis. I hurriedly used a plexiglas (called flexiglas from now on) and mdf mount for the router. Shown in pic 1. I could rock and twist this thing with one hand. Also the angle and bearings were rocking on the Z axis pipe.

The first thing I did to fix this was epoxy the angles to the lead nut structure. Next I reinforced the flexiglas mount with some more drops. Pic 2 shows this and the new mount I made using the machine and the reinforced old mount. I was pretty happy with the fit of all the dadoes and the thing was ridgid and square when glued up. Pic 3 shows the 2 mounts side by side and pic 4 shows the new mount on the machine.

Finally pic 5 shows a dust port I made, the waste board finally held with knobs and one of the first pieces I cut that needed relatively high precision. These 2 pieces glue together with rabbets, dadoes and ribs that have to be right or yield a crappy piece. The g code for 1/2" grooves produced grooves that held 1/2" ply tightly. I wasn't happy with the quality 'til I slowed the cuts to 50 ipm.

The dust port is 4" that I taped a reducer to 'til I can run 4" pipe from my big dust collector. I was surprised at how well the shop vac did, though.

My cutting area is about 48 x 34. Tomorrow I try to cut some cabinet panels that are about 36 x 32. Gonna take some creative clamping.

Madclicker
06-14-2006, 09:35 PM
They say the truth is in the pudding.

All the time I was building this machine I wondered 2 things:

1. How fast would it be?
2. How accurate would it be?

Ay first I tried to cut WAY too fast. I could push it through wood at well over 100 ipm, but I found out that the cut quality was just crap at that speed. Part of the problem was deflection, but my biggest ***** was the way the cutters chewed up the wood. I got over my initial need for speed (after ruining at least 1/3 sheet of baltic birch) and slowed the thing WAY down. Now I get such accurate cuts that I am measuring my cut pieces with dial calipers.

I made a hardwood medallion that shows just how nicely this thing cuts now....pic 1.

Writing the g-code for this was a biatch! I haven't used that much geometry/trig in 20 years!

I need to get back to work finishing this thing...never enough hours in the day. Gotta enclose the electronics and get the echain installed very soon or I'm sure there will be expensive smoke in the shop.

Madclicker
06-30-2006, 08:22 PM
I want to beef this thing up and was wondering what it would take to make most of my z out of al. On a whim I screwed a vise to my spoil board, clamped some 3/8 al plate, and chucked a VERY old VERY dull wood bit just to see.

Pretty cool to see it cut without a burp. My first real metal machining. After a few 1/16 or so passes the slot measured .503. I set the jog very slow and did it with manual control. THis little test lets me know I will be cutting al for real soon.

The machine has had many dozens of shakeout hrs now and is just too cool. It's mostly been run for light production. I feel comfortable enough in it's dependability to leave the shop for longer jobs. Nice to get away from the noise and dust for a change.

Madclicker
07-31-2006, 12:23 AM
It's been a very good week for freebee's! My brother gave me a stainless cabinet that is so like new I can't tell the difference. PIC 1. Also in that pic is a very nice...like new...vacuum pump. Long story, but I got it free by befriending a guy I bought a truckload of radioshack stuff from. Googled it and found it offered for $1100 retail. I also got a crappy microwave cabinet that I'm using to house my computer and stuff. Works for now. Pic 2.

txcowdog
07-31-2006, 12:44 AM
Excellent machine. Innovative design and heavy duty. Congrats on a stunning project.

Madclicker
10-14-2006, 06:39 PM
Thanks dog.

Well, I finally decided I had to wrap this one up and start on the next one. Too easy to just use the machine and leave the loose ends hanging.

The first pic is that nice stainless cabinet my brother gave me with a backer board I made from some 1/4" phenolic laminate (gotta luv dumpster diving at the cabinet supply shop!) This cabinet is just too cool, but unfortunately a little too big for this machine. Can't find a place to mount it. Soooo it's going for the next machine which will have a full 4 x 8 cutting area. It'll start with the table frame that I used at the beginning of this build. I'll get started on it as soon as I wrap up a few loose ends on this one.

The second pic is of some donuts I cut from MDF production drops. I'll use these one day to build a big drum sander. :)

The 3rd pic is my freebee vacuum pump mounted on my freebee compressor tank. Makes a very nice vacuum reservior. I've added a vacuum guage since the pic and the pump pulls 28 in-hg easily. Low volume, though. The tank should give it the umph for initial pull down.

Things to do in the near future:

1. Sides from freebee melamine chipboard.
2. Larger electronics cabinet.
3. Cable chains on the X.
4. Shop vac type hose on Y.
5. Utility drawers on side opposite electronics and cable chains.
6. Home switches and perhaps limit switches (not sure these are needed)
7. Spindle on/off control from sw.

After I get started on the next machine and get some experience with new ideas for linear travel I'll come back and redo the Y and Z on this machine. However, right now this thing works great and gets nothing but praise from me.

Madclicker
10-16-2006, 09:43 PM
Well, Made and installed the skirts. Only functionality they add (right now) is to the rigidity of the whole table. Next I'll mount my control cabinet and cable chains to the left side and make the right side a storage cabinet.

The 4 pics are just before and afters. Looks better like this anyway.

Madclicker
11-12-2006, 11:31 PM
I finally piped my real dust collector to my machine...what a difference. I thought the shop vac was doing an ok job, but it does nowhere near the job of a real collector. The collector would suck the 2-3" drops up to the ceiling and over to the separator before I even knew they were gone. I took a short (1 min) video with my lame camera. A production cut at 100 ipm and 120 rapids. .25" per pass. The video only show 2 of the 3 passes to cut through:

http://shopmatetools.com/vids/cnc1.avi

The pic shows the final piece....NO DUST!!!!

Next I'm working on a vacuum table. Got a sheet of Trupan ULF and gonna test it to see what kind of vacuum fixtures I can make. Manual clamping is getting really old.

Madclicker
11-19-2006, 11:03 PM
What I intended to just take a few hours killed my whole weekend. I decided I better "professionalize" my electronics and wiring or else sooner or later take a big hit in the wallet. I would have enjoyed working on making the machine better, but it's painful to tear it apart when it could be making money. Also, the scary aspect of f***king something up.

Previously I showed pics of the cabinet my brother gave me. Pic 1 shows the loaded cabinet with wire I used to rewire my steppers....just trailer wire from truevalue @ .29/ft.

Pic 2 shows the electronics installed. This cabinet seemed huge until I started stuffing it with my gorilla stuff. Saved room for future features like spindle control, charge pump, limit and home switches, many relays....etc.

Pic 3 shows the switch panel. Don't know yet how this will evolve. I'm using the AL cover to proto both this and the signal input box. When I have a final design I'll make covers from 1/4 phenolic laminate and engrave the legends. Right now I have master power switch and indicator lights for pwr, 12V and 5V. There is an E-Stop switch that's not functional yet. Gotta think how elaborate I want that to be.

Pic 4 shows heat sinks I glued to the trannie with high temp epoxy. This thing gets pretty hot and I had the heat sinks laying around. After a trial run today, I'm pretty sure I'll have to vent the cabinet.

Pic 5 shows my first attempt at routing the stepper power wires to the gantry trolley. I used discharge hose (from truevalue again). It was too flimsy to support itself, so I helped with a bungie cord. Clamped for now till I figure what I'm gonna do. At least it's not hanging from the shop light now!

Pic 6 shows the e-chain I finally installed on the gantry axis. It only took 1m to cover the 34" travel of the axis. That leaves almost 10' to use on the big router. It is riding on a phenolic plate that I still have to cut to size.

The last pic is my control cabinet as it is today. Not the final product, but it's moving along. I'm switching over to Mach from tcnc and have moved my favorite computer into the shop. Have to tweak all my cut files now.

More to come.

Madclicker
12-10-2006, 12:28 AM
I don't know how many are as ignorant as me about clamping materials, but the light turned on for me today. I've had a sheet of ULF for a while now and just been tripping over it. Today I made my first vacuum fixture. My back is gonna thank me forever for not having to do the same manual clamping.

This thing is as slick as cat crap! I cut 30 production pieces tonight and didn't get the slightest slip.

I used 2 shop vacs in series. That gave me about 5" hg....maybe 2.5 lb/sq/in.

The vac table itself I built from scraps and dumpster finds....except for the dust port and the trupan. Maybe $10, not counting gas.

The first pic is the layout of the backbone.

Second pic is of the plenum cover on.

The third pic is of some pvc pegboard I'm thinking of using. Anyone with ideas?

4th is pretty much the final fixture.

Next is 1st money cut with this fixture....actually first cut.

Another pic showing more intricate panels......

Mike F
12-10-2006, 09:53 AM
Steve,

Nice work. A couple of questions though. When you cut smaller parts do you cover the unwanted holes in order to maintain vacuum or is there enough suck to negate this? I am thinking, that without some way of sealing the uncovered holes when not utilising the whole of the work area, there will not be enough vacuum to hold small pieces.

It appears that you are cutting a full sheet which obviously works well.

The other question is about sacrificial tables. If you are cutting right through your material, do you use the peg board as a sacrificial element, throwing it away after a number of cuts or do you have some method of safeguarding the peg board?

Mike

Madclicker
12-10-2006, 05:53 PM
I'm not actually using the pegboard yet. Sorry, I didn't explain that well. Right now I'm only using base with the Trupan insert. The first pic below is the base. It has 1/2" plt scrap risers and 1/4" strips of ply around 3 sides. These are topped with 1/4" CC gasket. All this creates a plenum under the Trupan, which just sits in as an insert. Pic 2. The Trupan sits about 1/2" proud of the base. You can see the cut through traces. Cutting into the Trupan a little doesn't affect the overall hold. That's what makes this stuff such a great all-in-one spoil/bleeder board.

As for smaller pieces, shop vacs won't work for them......depends on what you mean by small of course. The smallest panel I cut right now is 24 x 12. I've tested a 27 x 12 and it holds ok. It holds better with the rest of the ULF covered with laminate scraps and I'm sure that's how I will cut them when it comes to it.

Small parts is where the pegboard comes in. I have a high quality, low volume pump. Pic 3. I mounted it on an old wheeled compressor tank to address the volume issue. I would like to make an insert for the base from the pegboard that would sit in it just like the Trupan does. Easy enough, except I would like to have it zoned so I can control vacuum areas by valve and not covering sections. The only thing I can think of is fabricating from solid PVC sheet. I certainly don't want to be remaking this, so I would be using other spoil boards/fixtures. I guess it wouldn't be too hard to make a zoned insert from PVC sheet. Just have to be careful to get it straight and flat.

All this is just a run-up to building a full sheet table. I couldn't imagine trying to use a full sheet router without a good zoned vacuum table. Hard enough on my back with this 1/3 sheet machine.

Mr.Chips
12-10-2006, 07:35 PM
Good job Steve. Really like the extensive use of the torsion box construction, makes for a light and strong build. And being a scrounger myself I like your frugal approach to the construction.

Just a word about the super fine dust that you will be generating, the dust vacuum you have catches 90% of the dust, that’s good but it's the 10% super fine dust that is going right through your filter that is the killer.

Bill Pentz is a fine dust survivor and has done a really nice job of documenting the dangers in this area., a very scientific approach to the solution of collecting it with a cyclone vacuum dust collector. Here is his web site: http://billpentz.com/woodworking/cyclone/index.cfm

Stu a fellow in Japan built Bill’s Cyclone and did a very good job documenting the construction with lots of photos and construction tips. Stu also has a lot of interesting projects too. Here is his link: http://www.ablett.jp/workshop/cyclone.htm

Good luck in the future

Hager

Madclicker
12-10-2006, 10:18 PM
Frugal is my middle name. The torsion boxes were a lot of work, but I'm very happy I did it that way. They are still as straight, flat and true as the day I made them.

I hear you about the dust. I make tons of it every week. My garbage men hate me, I'm sure. Can imagine dumping a BIG can of mdf flour and have it fly back at you. I hate dumping it 5 gallons at a time......RUN AWAY!

I'm very familiar with the pentz site. Have the cyclone plans sitting on my desk now. Just never enough hours. I'll build a cyclone soon, maybe not to the exact plans, and post the build here. I think I have a few shortcuts that might help others.

Mr.Chips
12-10-2006, 10:42 PM
Frugal is my middle name.
I'm very familiar with the pentz site. Have the cyclone plans sitting on my desk now. Just never enough hours. I'll build a cyclone soon, maybe not to the exact plans, and post the build here. I think I have a few shortcuts that might help others.

If you haven't seen the Stu's site in Japan he has a few good tips on the Cyclone construction too.
Hager

Madclicker
12-16-2006, 12:25 AM
A couple days ago I received my newest piece to this puzzle......a flexible, waterfroof, and more importantly dustproof keyboard. Only $13 delivered. This I will use along with the 15" lcd to make a machine-side control panel. Thoughts in progress, but at least I have full control at the machine now. Was a serious pain walking back and forth to the cabinet to rerun the g-code for small parts. I dug out an ooooold kvm switch and cables and now I can use the 19" monitor in the cabinet or switch to the 15" monitor and silicone keyboard at the machine.

The pic shows the whole setup with the machine side controls sitting on a tv tray.....obviously temporary. Don't know what the final control box or mount will be yet. Pretty sure the ultimarc board and joysticks will be included. Also have a lot of membrane panels.

jmytyk
12-19-2006, 03:48 AM
hey -- where did you get the keyboard?? i found some, just not so cheap. thanks.

Madclicker
12-19-2006, 09:05 AM
hey -- where did you get the keyboard?? i found some, just not so cheap. thanks.

Here's a link to the ebay seller's store:

Flex Keyboards (http://computers.search.ebay.com/_Computers-Networking_W0QQcatrefZC12QQfrppZ25QQsacatZ58058QQsassZidirectmartstore)

Several to chose from...mini, full, colors. I would have liked the mini size, but it has no pgup/pgdn.

BTW, seller ships FAST.

Madclicker
12-21-2006, 09:03 AM
The vacuum table has worked great, but it wasn't as flat as I would have liked so I skimmed the bleeder board last night. I measured it to be about 3/32" out and ended taking off about .100" in 4 or 5 passes. It's now dead nuts with my router. I found an added benefit of doing this was that by removing the top, harder layer of the VLF the air flows was opened up significantly.

I wrote some simple gcode to do this. I used a 3/4" bit, 1/2" step and 100 ipm feed. It can be modified easily for any size table, bit, step or feed.

eqreservoir
12-21-2006, 09:13 AM
What is VLF?

Madclicker
12-21-2006, 09:19 AM
What is VLF?

Very Light Fiberboard.

Madclicker
12-21-2006, 09:20 AM
Table Skimming Gcode:


; This program skims a 32" x 24" spoil/bleeder board

N1000 #3=-.125 ;skim depth
N2000 #4=4 ;X clear
N3000 #5=28 ;Y clear
N4000 #1=0 ;Y position variable
N5000 #2=.5 ;safe z
N6000 g0 z#2
N7000 g0 x-1 y0
N8000 g0 z#3
N9000
N10000 ; start of REPEAT LOOP
N11000 g1 X33 f100
N12000 #1=[#1+.5]
N13000 g0 Y#1
N14000 g1 X-1
N15000 #1=[#1+.5]
N16000 g0 Y#1
N17000 IF #1 EQ 25 M97 O20000 ; UNTIL condition test
N18000 M97 O10000 ; repeat loop, condition not met
N20000 ; beginning of the end
N30000 g0 z#2
N40000 g0 X#4 Y#5 ; clear table
N50000 M30 ; end of end

eqreservoir
12-21-2006, 12:50 PM
Thanks, Steve. I'm familiar with MDF, VLF was a new one. So many acronyms. Do they have VLF at the HD/lowes type stores?

Madclicker
12-21-2006, 01:32 PM
Doubtful you'll find it at Lowes. My regular cabinet supply had to special order a sheet of it for me. It also goes by the tradename "Trupan".

eqreservoir
12-21-2006, 01:41 PM
Thanks. I will look for Trupan.

Dave's_Not_Here
12-21-2006, 02:39 PM
Here's a link to the ebay seller's store:

Flex Keyboards (http://computers.search.ebay.com/_Computers-Networking_W0QQcatrefZC12QQfrppZ25QQsacatZ58058QQsassZidirectmartstore)

Several to chose from...mini, full, colors. I would have liked the mini size, but it has no pgup/pgdn.

BTW, seller ships FAST.

Madclicker,

What is the action/sensitivity like on the keys? I have never used one but need to seriously consider replacing my old one and this looks like just the ticket. Do you have to press the keys any harder than a "normal" keyboard?

Thanks!

Madclicker
12-21-2006, 03:46 PM
Madclicker,

What is the action/sensitivity like on the keys? I have never used one but need to seriously consider replacing my old one and this looks like just the ticket. Do you have to press the keys any harder than a "normal" keyboard?

Thanks!

I never said anything, but I was pleasantly surprised with how well this thing works. I don't know how many are old enough to remember the "chicklet" keyboards they tried to pass off on us in the 70's; they were horrible. I was expecting something like those, but I really like this one. I'm not a typist, but so far I haven't had to make any special adjustments to use it.

Madclicker
12-21-2006, 03:49 PM
I do have to add that I only use the lcd/flex keyboard to control the machine. When I want to do much of anything else I switch to the 19" crt and regular keyboard/mouse and Windoze.

Madclicker
12-29-2006, 10:08 PM
Well, it had to happen. I finally wore something out. It turns out to be a steel acme lead nut and a pretty light hit. I knew when I built this, that steel on steel lead screw/nut setup was gonna be a weak link. Sure enough, the nut finally wore until it stripped through.

Now, to be totally fair to the design, it took several hundred hours of production work to make the nut fail. That may be more than any hobby player ever uses their machine.

Anyway, pic 1 shows the failed lead nuts and pic 2 shows the replacement nuts I made from uhmw.

I hope the replacement nuts last for a while. I intend to change my x and y axis to 1/2-10 5 start screws with dumpster nuts soon. Hoping for 300-400 ipm rapids and cuts.

Madclicker
01-10-2007, 12:39 AM
Well, I think I found the lower limits of my vacuum table setup. I tried to cut 8 panels that were 32 x 12 and one panel let go. When I started cutting 27 x 12 panels 2 out of 3 let go and I didn't try the 4th. Makes me think 400 sq in or so is the limit with my vac setup.

I don't know how many people here actually use machines they make for work, but am posting for any that do and might use the info.

paulC
01-10-2007, 02:06 PM
Are you still only using 5'' Hg vacuum that you mentioned earlier.
I have been playing with vacuum tables as well and I gave up trying to use mdf in the construction. Could never get a good vacuum. I have had far more sucess with acrilic. With acrilic I get between 18 and 24'' Hg depending on what I'm diong.
Paul

Madclicker
01-12-2007, 12:06 AM
Are you still only using 5'' Hg vacuum that you mentioned earlier.
I have been playing with vacuum tables as well and I gave up trying to use mdf in the construction. Could never get a good vacuum. I have had far more sucess with acrilic. With acrilic I get between 18 and 24'' Hg depending on what I'm diong.
Paul

Paul, I never tried MDF for a bleeder board. Everything I read indicated it was too dense for the job. I started with ULF and it worked better than I could have expected.

BTW, I switched shop vacs and ended up with 7 hg static at the hose. Don't know yet what I get at the table. I wanna build some manifolds into the table....but.

Rance
01-17-2007, 10:23 AM
Steve,

I've enjoyed reading your thread. Post #82 pic 3, and Post #119 pic 4(on the gantry) show examples of your oak banding. Could you elaborate on it and maybe include a very closeup pic? Is it 1/32" thick or more like 1/8". You also mentioned that you resawed it, and I assume then planed it. Most planers don't like to plane down to really thin dimensions so did you use a fixture to carry it through the planer? Thanks.

Rance

Madclicker
01-25-2007, 09:48 PM
Sorry, I missed this until I just came to post a small update.

The banding is closer to 1/4". What I do is resaw 3/4" 1by stock into 3 slices. I take the first slice and then plane the cut face of the thicker piece. I actually use a jointer to clean this face. Then I resaw that stock into 2. What I end up with is 3 pieces that are nearly 1/4" thick from the original 3/4 stock. One side is finished and one still has saw marks. The sawsn side goes in. Edging MDF this way and then laminating it makes an extremely durable product.

My cheap camera takes crappy close pics. I'm gonna use similar construction on my new little router. I'll take some pics of these details on that build log:

The MiniMe Project (http://www.cnczone.com/forums/showthread.php?t=30034)

Madclicker
01-25-2007, 10:55 PM
I just replaced the last of my steel lead nuts with plastic...good riddance. I advice no one to use steel on steel for screws and nut.

I'm having a problem with the new Y nuts. It appears to be related to expansion with temperature. It appears to bind when cold (cold here is 50 degrees). I can only get 75 ipm on the Y axis until I run it a while and then I'm back to 120 or so. Very wierd.

paulC
01-26-2007, 04:17 AM
Some High density plastics are not good for being temprature stable. I assume thats what is happening. Try re-taping the nut when it is cold.
Paul

Rance
01-26-2007, 07:51 AM
Thanks for the info. Steve.


Cut the grooves for the t-track on the main bed today.

I HATE cutting grooves. Do you use a dado on your saw or use a router?

Madclicker
01-26-2007, 12:01 PM
Thanks for the info. Steve.



I HATE cutting grooves. Do you use a dado on your saw or use a router?

These were stopped grooves, so I had to do them with a router. It's an absolutely miserable job. Now, I use the machine to cut all the grooves and dados I do. Life is much better:rainfro:

Madclicker
01-26-2007, 11:13 PM
Some High density plastics are not good for being temprature stable. I assume thats what is happening. Try re-taping the nut when it is cold.
Paul

Yea, that's what I suspect, I did that with the other 2 axis nuts. In fact, I put them in the freezer before the last run with the tap.

I knew this was too tight, but figured I could "break it in". I dread taking it back apart again, but it's just flat painful to watch it do rapids at 70 ipm.

Glidergider
02-17-2007, 01:16 AM
This is an amazing thread. What a great machine.

Crazybillybob
02-22-2007, 05:18 PM
I'm pretty sure you mentioned making "Taps" earlier for the Acme Threads. Can you elaborate on that? Nice machine, I'm just in the getting a clue phase...so good examples are what I'm looking at.

CrazyBillyBob
:withstupi

Glidergider
02-22-2007, 06:04 PM
Billybob
Check out my picture I posted last night.
http://www.cnczone.com/forums/showthread.php?p=261722#post261722
Post #73. I used my dremel and bench grinder.
Dave

tybrenis
02-22-2007, 06:38 PM
Hey Crazybillybob! Wierd running into you here, right? It's nice to see that another modder is building a CNC. Mine is almost done, should be finished in a week or two. Look out for me showing off on TBCS....

Crazybillybob
02-22-2007, 11:34 PM
Tyberis, I wondered if that was you! My current Project would have been done in half the time if I had one of these thing built when I started. Now that he's almost done, I've got to start planning my next project...It will be use for some Mod I'm sure :)

Glider, That's what I was looking for !!THANKS!

CrazyBillyBob
:withstupi

Madclicker
02-23-2007, 01:12 AM
This is an amazing thread. What a great machine.

Thanks, I love this thing. Put 4 hrs on it tonight while I was watching TV. I have things I still want to do to it and will post when done.

Madclicker
02-23-2007, 01:21 AM
I'm pretty sure you mentioned making "Taps" earlier for the Acme Threads. Can you elaborate on that? Nice machine, I'm just in the getting a clue phase...so good examples are what I'm looking at.

CrazyBillyBob
:withstupi

I made the 5/8 tap when I first built the machine. I should have made plastic nuts right then, but I did what I had seen others do and used steel nuts. MISTAKE. Herd mentality.

I don't have a lathe, so all I did was make a jig to hold the screw and spun it with a 3/4" drill while I ground a taper. Then I used a die grinder with a 1/16 kerf cut-off blade and made grooves in it. Just take your time and make the edges of the "teeth" crisp.

Run the tap through several times until it get somewhat loose and then freeze the plastic and run the tap again. I didn't do this on my last nut and I have to redo it, I guess. I thought it would break-in with time, but I'm still only running at 60 on that axis.

Madclicker
02-23-2007, 02:08 AM
I found a pic on epay of a mount someone designed for the hitachi a lot of us use as spindles. Very smart use of the locking cam lever from the original base.

Madclicker
02-23-2007, 02:32 AM
I took the cam lever off my never used base and it fit perfectly on my baltic birch mount. Wish I could say I designed it this way.

harryn
06-27-2007, 12:29 AM
Just marking this thread for reference