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jkarisny
09-10-2011, 12:16 PM
This is my newly finished Hardware store CNC machine. Let me know what you think!



Home made CNC with hardware store parts - YouTube

jkarisny
09-10-2011, 01:55 PM
Here are some pictures:


http://i1040.photobucket.com/albums/b402/jonkarisny/CNC%20Project/CNCpics006.jpg

http://i1040.photobucket.com/albums/b402/jonkarisny/CNC%20Project/CNCpics005.jpg

http://i1040.photobucket.com/albums/b402/jonkarisny/CNC%20Project/CNCpics004.jpg

http://i1040.photobucket.com/albums/b402/jonkarisny/CNC%20Project/CNCpics003.jpg

http://i1040.photobucket.com/albums/b402/jonkarisny/CNC%20Project/CNCpics002.jpg

http://i1040.photobucket.com/albums/b402/jonkarisny/CNC%20Project/CNCpics001.jpg

http://i1040.photobucket.com/albums/b402/jonkarisny/CNC%20Project/CNCpics007.jpg

judleroy
09-10-2011, 02:24 PM
You have done an excellent job. It seems to work very smoothly. A great machine to get into Cnc.
Judleroy

jkarisny
09-10-2011, 03:03 PM
You have done an excellent job. It seems to work very smoothly. A great machine to get into Cnc.
Judleroy

Thank you!

I have a lot to learn, but I'm certainly addicted. I have been working on my code writing, in the video I have a lot of unnecessary and redundant machine moves. I have reduced my cut time dramatically just from experimenting.

I think I have less than $200 into the machine....including electronics. I also designed and built it rather quickly...less than 2 weeks, after work.

RomanLini
09-11-2011, 05:33 AM
Nice build! That's a good arrangement for getting reliable motion from drawer slides.

One weak point looks to be the use of a single narrow rail for the Z axis, that's a lot of side leverage there on that narrow rail. I would be tempted to screw a flate plate of wood to the Z structure, then use 2 drawer slides for Z or 2 rails/rods of some type.

And maybe lower Z a little bit, to give you a bit more rigidity to cut out flat stock as being "addicted" I'm guessing you will use this machine to make parts for the next one... ;)

cyclestart
09-11-2011, 08:05 AM
I think I have less than $200 into the machine....including electronics.
What are the details of the electronics ?
You've built yourself a very cool unit for $200.

jkarisny
09-11-2011, 09:34 AM
What are the details of the electronics ?
You've built yourself a very cool unit for $200.


I have the TB6560 driver ($22), a 12v power supply ($12) off ebay and small 5.3v/ .75A stepper motors ($10).

For the computer running the whole deal, I used a HP Pavillion 503n I had laying around.

How do you guys wire up everything? I want sockets on the cpu case that I can plug the steppers into, so I don't have to drill holes and use grommets. As you see from the pictures below, I need to clean up the wiring.



http://i1040.photobucket.com/albums/b402/jonkarisny/CNC%20Project/CNCpics008.jpg

http://i1040.photobucket.com/albums/b402/jonkarisny/CNC%20Project/CNCpics009.jpg

http://i1040.photobucket.com/albums/b402/jonkarisny/CNC%20Project/CNCpics010.jpg

jkarisny
09-11-2011, 09:45 AM
Nice build! That's a good arrangement for getting reliable motion from drawer slides.

One weak point looks to be the use of a single narrow rail for the Z axis, that's a lot of side leverage there on that narrow rail. I would be tempted to screw a flate plate of wood to the Z structure, then use 2 drawer slides for Z or 2 rails/rods of some type.

And maybe lower Z a little bit, to give you a bit more rigidity to cut out flat stock as being "addicted" I'm guessing you will use this machine to make parts for the next one... ;)


Thank you!
I was thinking the same thing about the Z, but turns out, it's the strongest axis! The part I need to make is the router mount itself, as you can see I have a pipe clamp and some wire holding it on.

And yes, It's already cutting parts for the next machine....:D

EBC
09-11-2011, 06:49 PM
I love it!!! Well done and don't worry about cleaning up the wires....:cheers:

jkarisny
09-11-2011, 10:59 PM
I love it!!! Well done and don't worry about cleaning up the wires....:cheers:

Thanks!

Even though it doesn't look like much, I still want to clean up the wiring so It can be more mobile. I still need to build a large base/cabinet for it. I'll post some pics after I find some 6 pin sockets and plugs...

process_pro
09-12-2011, 01:47 AM
I like it!
Most of it appears very simple...cut and dry!
What did you use to drive the steppers and where did you obtain them?

RomanLini
09-12-2011, 08:31 AM
...
The part I need to make is the router mount itself, as you can see I have a pipe clamp and some wire holding it on.
...

Take a look at this for a cheap $29.99 spindle choice;
http://www.harborfreight.com/electric-die-grinder-with-long-shaft-44141.html

http://www.harborfreight.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/i/m/image_1075.jpg

That will be easier to mount than the Dremel and a much better functioning spindle. :)

jkarisny
09-12-2011, 06:20 PM
Take a look at this for a cheap $29.99 spindle choice;
Electric Die Grinder with Long Shaft (http://www.harborfreight.com/electric-die-grinder-with-long-shaft-44141.html)

http://www.harborfreight.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/i/m/image_1075.jpg

That will be easier to mount than the Dremel and a much better functioning spindle. :)

You really think it will be a better spindle? I can see it being easier to mount. I just used the dremel because I had it but it seems to have some run-out. Does anyone use the Harbor Freight spindle? I'd be interested to see how those bearings are compared to the dremel.

judleroy
09-12-2011, 06:43 PM
It's a die grinder so it should have better bearings. As for tuning that's questionable. If it were me I'd save up for a Bosch colt or similar small router. Dremal tools do not have good bearings and are not very rigid although it is a good starter spindle.
Judleroy

judleroy
09-12-2011, 06:45 PM
Sorry instead of "tuning" it should say runout. These iPads auto correct spelling even when you don't want them to.
Judleroy

CarveOne
09-12-2011, 11:01 PM
That die grinder's manual says it's 14 inches overall length and weighs a little over 4 pounds, 500 watt, 25k rpm. It is considerably more power than a Dremel, and far more rigid where it counts.

The big question is what is the typical run-out of these things. I doubt it is as good as most routers considering the intended uses of a die grinder.

CarveOne

RomanLini
09-13-2011, 03:46 PM
Yeah it definitely has MUCH better bearing support in the cast metal "neck" then a Dremel has in it's flimsy plastic neck... Although sorry to the OP, I didn't realise they were over 4 pounds!

CarveOne- usually die-grinding is an application where the runout needs to be pretty small, most air die grinders for instance are pretty good. But these are all probably made in the far east by some factory contracted to the lowest dollar bid... So runout is anyone's guess. I'm still using a cheap brand router with good runout but I hand picked it in the store and it was the third one tested. The other 2 were nasty. And a lot of that is the collets too I think.

CarveOne
09-13-2011, 05:49 PM
Yeah it definitely has MUCH better bearing support in the cast metal "neck" then a Dremel has in it's flimsy plastic neck... Although sorry to the OP, I didn't realise they were over 4 pounds!

CarveOne- usually die-grinding is an application where the runout needs to be pretty small, most air die grinders for instance are pretty good. But these are all probably made in the far east by some factory contracted to the lowest dollar bid... So runout is anyone's guess. I'm still using a cheap brand router with good runout but I hand picked it in the store and it was the third one tested. The other 2 were nasty. And a lot of that is the collets too I think.

I'm 100 miles from the nearest Harbor Freight store (they know me all too well though) and I've never seen one at that store. I've never seen or used one either, so run-out was the first question. It also seemed to be a bit unwieldy for use on a small CNC machine, but if it clears the ceiling ...... and doesn't topple the machine over on fast direction reversals ....... then it might work perfectly for General Overkill's CNC machine. :D

CarveOne

jkarisny
09-13-2011, 06:39 PM
Yikes, over 4 pounds!?

I don't think my tiny little steppers could handle that amount of weight. I guess I could upgrade, but I'd rather not. Wonder if I could add a spring assist, to lessen the "weight"? Has anyone done this?

ma1
09-13-2011, 10:58 PM
Good job, the setup looks clean. Is that a linear rail in the z-axis?

I am also building a drawer-slide low cost CNC, I had started a thread a while back, you might be able to find it. My design has only x-axis with drawer slides (slides in a vertical position). It is going very slow due to lack of time.

However, one thing that I have noticed is that the 100 lbs load bearing drawer slides are great for in-plane, but have a lot of play in the out-of-plane direction (+z direction the way you mounted them). I am afraid that if your dremel catches even slightly on the work piece, it will lift your entire x-y table up with it. This is the reason I mounted mine in a vertical direction with mechanical constraints in the out-of-plane direction.

jkarisny
09-14-2011, 06:57 AM
Good job, the setup looks clean. Is that a linear rail in the z-axis?

I am also building a drawer-slide low cost CNC, I had started a thread a while back, you might be able to find it. My design has only x-axis with drawer slides (slides in a vertical position). It is going very slow due to lack of time.

However, one thing that I have noticed is that the 100 lbs load bearing drawer slides are great for in-plane, but have a lot of play in the out-of-plane direction (+z direction the way you mounted them). I am afraid that if your dremel catches even slightly on the work piece, it will lift your entire x-y table up with it. This is the reason I mounted mine in a vertical direction with mechanical constraints in the out-of-plane direction.

Yes, That is a linear rail for the z- axis. It's very tiny but surprisingly stout.
As far as the drawer slides, I don't really have play in any direction ? If the tool "caught" which I don't really know why it would, my luan plywood base would probably crack first. or the tool would rip off...lol

sirkossorg
09-14-2011, 08:11 AM
This is my favorite type of build. Looks good. Thanks for sharing.

ma1
09-14-2011, 10:32 AM
Yes, That is a linear rail for the z- axis. It's very tiny but surprisingly stout.
As far as the drawer slides, I don't really have play in any direction ? If the tool "caught" which I don't really know why it would, my luan plywood base would probably crack first. or the tool would rip off...lol

Probably the weight of your x-y table is hiding this out-of-plane play. Try to lift the x or y table in the +z direction with your hand. With a little force, you will feel it moving. Now imagine a high-torque rotating motor applying even a stronger force.
The only constraint you have is the small nut attached to the thin leadscrew, which may not be enough if the dremel has enough torque.

Here is my thread if you want to read about my experiences:

http://www.cnczone.com/forums/diy-cnc_router_table_machines/124650-my_first_desktop_cnc.html

Good luck

Mountaincraft
09-14-2011, 11:09 AM
Wow.. Great idea for a CNC machine...

schmutzig
09-14-2011, 11:24 AM
Very nice! If you do any PCB fabrication I'd like to see the results. A small and low cost machine like this could be great for that. Thanks for sharing it!

Mountaincraft
09-14-2011, 11:31 AM
A small laminate trimmer router might be the hot ticket for this machine...

schmutzig
09-14-2011, 11:37 AM
How do you guys wire up everything? I want sockets on the cpu case that I can plug the steppers into, so I don't have to drill holes and use grommets. As you see from the pictures below, I need to clean up the wiring.

I think most people have an external box for the stepper driver and breakout board and then the parallel cable connects it to the computer. Since you have the stepper driver in the computer itself you could use something like this.

Two Serial (DB9, RS232, COM1) Ports Bracket with Cable | eBay (http://www.ebay.com/itm/Two-Serial-DB9-RS232-COM1-Ports-Bracket-Cable-/260766109595)

Then get some DB9 connectors (even from the local Radio Shack) and put those on your stepper motors. A few other stepper drivers like the Geckodrive G540 use the DB9 connector as well so if you wired things up the same way you could transition to a G540 down the road if you wanted.

RomanLini
09-14-2011, 02:01 PM
Yikes, over 4 pounds!?

I don't think my tiny little steppers could handle that amount of weight.
...

Yeah sorry about that! I had seen the ads for that die grinder at $29.95 and recommended it to someone else last week (as it's cheap as a Dremel but more rigid), but I didn't realise it was quite that big!

Hey it looks little in the picture! ;)

jkarisny
09-14-2011, 06:21 PM
A small laminate trimmer router might be the hot ticket for this machine...

That's what I had my eye on. I don't really have any experience with them though. I'd hate to buy one (that's as much as I have in the whole machine) and not gain anything.

Anybody using one of those?

Mountaincraft
09-14-2011, 06:47 PM
I've not used one for CNC, but I have a small makita laminate trimmer, and the thing is great when used for what it is designed for... (I use it to flush trim formica after gluing)... I would think it would be superior to a dremel though... much more robust tool overall...

jkarisny
09-14-2011, 07:13 PM
I've not used one for CNC, but I have a small makita laminate trimmer, and the thing is great when used for what it is designed for... (I use it to flush trim formica after gluing)... I would think it would be superior to a dremel though... much more robust tool overall...

Well then, Mountaincraft, there you have it, I'm going to purchase one...if it's not all you say it is, I blame you! Deal? Lol, just kidding, but I'll probably go browsing for one this weekend.

Mountaincraft
09-14-2011, 07:57 PM
Be sure and read the warning labels and disclaimers tattooed on my posterior.. My unpaid lawyers certainly have all the bases covered...
If you plug the thing in and take it in the bathtub, it's clearly stated not to do that...

Translation: "I am not responsible for 'anything!' "

jkarisny
09-14-2011, 08:07 PM
Be sure and read the warning labels and disclaimers tattooed on my posterior.. My unpaid lawyers certainly have all the bases covered...
If you plug the thing in and take it in the bathtub, it's clearly stated not to do that...

Translation: "I am not responsible for 'anything!' "

Well, I gotta blame someone, and it's not going to be me! I'll just bring my wife shopping with me, if it doesn't work, I'll blame her for rushing me at the store....lol :nono:

ma1
09-14-2011, 08:13 PM
Well then, Mountaincraft, there you have it, I'm going to purchase one...if it's not all you say it is, I blame you! Deal? Lol, just kidding, but I'll probably go browsing for one this weekend.

amazon.com has a pretty good price ($70) on the "porter cable 7310", which is a cnc favorite and should do most jobs for you. Lowes also has decent prices on other brands.

jkarisny
09-14-2011, 08:25 PM
Very nice! If you do any PCB fabrication I'd like to see the results. A small and low cost machine like this could be great for that. Thanks for sharing it!


I'm not really into electronics as far as PCB's go, but I'd load the g-code and run it if anyone has one.... What kind of bit would be needed?

RomanLini
09-15-2011, 11:12 AM
Small engraving pointed bits. Normally they are a 1/8" shank. There is a PCB section of this forum (it's in the "electronics" section) where they discuss PCB milling and the best bits and software etc;
PCB milling - CNCzone.com-The Largest Machinist Community on the net! (http://www.cnczone.com/forums/pcb_milling/?)

Bob Adams
09-15-2011, 11:51 AM
Hi, Zen Toolworks has a nice DC motor with a ER11 on it. Look like a good motor for this project.
Thanks for the pictures and keep up the good work.

Bob A
CNC Projects (http://www.cad2gcode.com/cncprojects)

FannBlade
09-15-2011, 12:57 PM
Let me tell you this is one of the most inspiring builds I have seen on here.

As for myself after countless hours reading thousands of post and builds.
I have finally started my builds (lathe and mill) constantly wondering if it will do the job.
Everyone talks about tool, machine deflections ,runout and heat.
"will you be able to maintain + - .000001 accuracy with that setup?"
Heck sometimes I wonder if the moon will effect my shop floor....:)

...and here you are couple hundred dollars down the road and making chips 2 weeks later! Not to mention all the real world experience you are gaining while some of us are still punching formulas in scientific calculators.

Great JOB! Hail to the Home Depot Builder! :cheers:

jkarisny
09-15-2011, 08:51 PM
Let me tell you this is one of the most inspiring builds I have seen on here.

As for myself after countless hours reading thousands of post and builds.
I have finally started my builds (lathe and mill) constantly wondering if it will do the job.
Everyone talks about tool, machine deflections ,runout and heat.
"will you be able to maintain + - .000001 accuracy with that setup?"
Heck sometimes I wonder if the moon will effect my shop floor....:)

...and here you are couple hundred dollars down the road and making chips 2 weeks later! Not to mention all the real world experience you are gaining while some of us are still punching formulas in scientific calculators.

Great JOB! Hail to the Home Depot Builder! :cheers:



Wow, thank you so much for your very kind words! I'm glad I was able to inspire at least on person on the site!
That was my goal, do a little research, learn the basics, and build a machine that can do what I need it to. (for now) And it does just that! I cut my first acrylic tonight! I'll post pics tomorrow, it's getting late and the wife asked me to put our little girl to bed!
:banana:

jkarisny
09-16-2011, 06:03 AM
Here are some pics of last nights adventure in acrylic cutting. The part is cut from 3/8" sheet. The bit I used was actually a micro drill, .044"
I broke my first bit on insertion, I forgot to turn my feed rate down. But I think it turned out rather nice!


http://i1040.photobucket.com/albums/b402/jonkarisny/CNC%20Project/CNCpics011-1.jpg

http://i1040.photobucket.com/albums/b402/jonkarisny/CNC%20Project/CNCpics012-1.jpg

http://i1040.photobucket.com/albums/b402/jonkarisny/CNC%20Project/CNCpics013.jpg

http://i1040.photobucket.com/albums/b402/jonkarisny/CNC%20Project/CNCpics014.jpg

http://i1040.photobucket.com/albums/b402/jonkarisny/CNC%20Project/CNCpics015.jpg

http://i1040.photobucket.com/albums/b402/jonkarisny/CNC%20Project/CNCpics016.jpg

http://i1040.photobucket.com/albums/b402/jonkarisny/CNC%20Project/CNCpics018-1.jpg

http://i1040.photobucket.com/albums/b402/jonkarisny/CNC%20Project/CNCpics017.jpg

jkarisny
09-16-2011, 08:57 AM
This part was for work. It is used in our polisher to polish small metal samples.

jkarisny
09-16-2011, 09:15 AM
This part was for work. It is used in our polisher to polish small metal samples.

http://i1040.photobucket.com/albums/b402/jonkarisny/Mobile%20Uploads/1316180737.jpg

http://i1040.photobucket.com/albums/b402/jonkarisny/Mobile%20Uploads/1316180777.jpg

Dman65
09-16-2011, 10:52 AM
Very nice looking work! I started looking at designs and accumulating parts to build a machine two years ago. I finally built something totally different than I planned over the last couple of months that has a 9x10 cutting area. The fact that yours just took 2 weeks to get finished makes me quite jealous lol.

jkarisny
09-17-2011, 07:41 PM
Very nice looking work! I started looking at designs and accumulating parts to build a machine two years ago. I finally built something totally different than I planned over the last couple of months that has a 9x10 cutting area. The fact that yours just took 2 weeks to get finished makes me quite jealous lol.

Thankyou!

My design is proving to be very reliable. I have been cutting different parts out, some small, some larger (9"x9") and some pretty intricate. I think the only thing I'd change is the dremel and maybe some more powerful steppers.

I also ordered a parallel card for my older toshiba laptop, I'm going to try using that to run Mach (it was cheap, and I know it might not work). The computer I have running it now is power challenged and that doesn't play well with Mach.

All in all, I think I was pretty successful in my project.

I plan to take the machine apart and paint the frame and I will document the the rebuild for this thread.

Stay tuned!

PaulRowntree
09-17-2011, 07:48 PM
I am pretty sure that a portable will not work (the M3 manual talks about this) because of the power saving junk in a portable that you cannot work around. I would be skeptical about a PCMIA (?) parallel card too. Get the real deal.

neilw20
09-17-2011, 09:44 PM
Anything PC >=1G on the hard rubbish still with parallel port is perfect.
Usually a zero cost item these days.

balya
08-14-2014, 04:12 AM
Hi all,
I have built many cnc desktop routers using drawer slides.Drawer slides are good alternative to linear slides.A repeat accuracy of 0.1 mm is achievable
Here are some machines i have build and sold .I used drawer slides on all axis.
thanks.
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