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View Full Version : Newbie Painting fiberglass plug / mold for forming styrene?



RFC
08-19-2011, 09:59 PM
Hello,
I am as green as grass when it comes to plastic forming. BUT, I have lots of enthusiasm and am eager to learn.
I would like to home produce / thermoform .020" flock covered styrene to make display case liners that are about 8" x 12" and 1" thick.
Using a sample liner that I wanted to duplicate, I made my first plug ( terminology?) by layering the inside back with Tiger hair fiberglass.
Removed the plug and now filling the voids and air pockets with glazing putty.
What I would like to know is after the plug is filled and sanded, can I paint with lacquer primer progressively sanding with finer grit paper
to achieve a semi glossy surface?
Would the last step be to wax the plug before using? Will lacquer stand up to the heat of styrene forming?
Thank you for your help, Bob

trophy
08-22-2011, 04:25 AM
I would fill the tiger stuff with more bog or better still a polyester resin thickened with talc and trowel on.
The resin talc mix will sand down to a very smooth surface.
As you are flocking the part I would have thought it does not need to be that good a surface.
You will be able to vac over the polyester talc surface without further treatment.

J&M Enterprises
09-08-2011, 08:57 AM
Hello,
I am as green as grass when it comes to plastic forming. BUT, I have lots of enthusiasm and am eager to learn.
I would like to home produce / thermoform .020" flock covered styrene to make display case liners that are about 8" x 12" and 1" thick.
Using a sample liner that I wanted to duplicate, I made my first plug ( terminology?) by layering the inside back with Tiger hair fiberglass.
Removed the plug and now filling the voids and air pockets with glazing putty.
What I would like to know is after the plug is filled and sanded, can I paint with lacquer primer progressively sanding with finer grit paper
to achieve a semi glossy surface?
Would the last step be to wax the plug before using? Will lacquer stand up to the heat of styrene forming?
Thank you for your help, Bob

I can't comment for sure on the lacquer, but I can tell you what we use. For starters, I would use a high-temp bondo to smooth everything. You can then paint it with an all-purpose primer (google "fourseal") or a higher-temp product, like Duratech.