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ronstewa
05-04-2011, 08:00 AM
Hello, I am very new to the cnc world. I just bought a cnc router with a 5x10 table with wincnc and xp as operating system. My question is I have a chance to buy either bobcad pro with art or vcarve pro. I dont know much about either one. I want to start making signs, do some carving with it and also do nesting for some of my furniture I make. I just dont no where to start with what software.
Thanks

Tony Mac
05-04-2011, 08:34 AM
Hello Ron,

I'd recommend downloading the Free Trial version of VCarve Pro and
also watching the Free Training videos that are available from the
Vectric web site.

The video tutorials will give you a good overview of how to use the
software for designing and cutting signs a carved projects

See > Aspire Tutorials (http://www.vectric.com/WebSite/Vectric/support/aspire3_vcp6/aspire3_vcp6_tutorials_tut.html)

Trial Download > Download Trial Versions and Tutorials (http://www.vectric.com/WebSite/Vectric/products/download_products.htm)

The Trial version will also let you save toolpaths to cut the supplied
Evaluation files on your own CNC router.

There's also lots of useful information on the Vectric Forum where
users talking about machines, tooling, materials, etc.

Forum > Vectric Forum (http://www.vectric.com/forum/)

If you have any further questions let me know

Have fun!!

Tony

Treischl
05-04-2011, 08:35 AM
Hello, I have sent you a Private Message, please read it and feel free to contact me!

Ted

Fish4Fun
05-05-2011, 11:46 PM
ronstewa,

I am also new to CNC and CAM. I have a great deal of experience with embedded controllers & software in general, but have found the world of CAM & Controllers to be a-typical of most software/firmware environments. I am lucky to be in a unique position of having been able to try-out several CAD/CAM packages. The Vectric software is certainly the most user friendly I have run across, but you need to understand that in the world of CAD/CAM, "user-friendly" is kind of like taking a crash course in jet-fuel engineering and suddenly making the quantum leap to designing jet engines, LOL. All of the software (Including Vectrics) is powerful, and therefore assumes you have some idea what you are doing.

DO NOT assume if "Cut2D" is "good", that you should get "Cut3D", this would be a HUGE mistake. V-Carve Pro is (best I can tell) as much a CAD program as it is a CAM program. I have had NO LUCK importing vector drawings from various CAD programs to any of Vectric's software (I am certain this is some flaw in my methodology), but using either Aspire or V-Carve Pro, it is very easy to "re-draw" a part and define tool-paths (I would STRONGLY advise watching their videos).

Sadly every "tutorial" I have followed (CAMBAM, VECTRIC, BOBCAD-CAM, EDGECAM, MASTERCAM, RHINO3D and a few others) make "following the tutorial" very simple, but the reality of "starting from scratch" is quite different as a newbie. Of the applications I have used, the Vectric offerings are the only ones I have found even remotely intuitive. While "Cut3D" is a very powerful application, it is by far the least intuitive of their venue. I would look at Cut2D, V-Carve Pro or Aspire to begin with. Essentially Cut3D allows a 4th Axis, and imports Vector drawings at what-ever "view point" they were "saved" from, and reconciling that view point to a simple 2D profile is difficult at best. In theory anything that can be done in one of Vectric's applications can be done in the rest of them, in reality, working in V-Carve Pro or Aspire's CAD interface is by far the simplest method of "getting the job done".

Of course, this is just my opinion.

FIsh

ger21
05-06-2011, 07:45 AM
I have had NO LUCK importing vector drawings from various CAD programs to any of Vectric's software (I am certain this is some flaw in my methodology)

If you can post a sample or two of your drawings, I can probably tell you why they're not working for you.





While "Cut3D" is a very powerful application, it is by far the least intuitive of their venue. I would look at Cut2D, V-Carve Pro or Aspire to begin with. Essentially Cut3D allows a 4th Axis, and imports Vector drawings at what-ever "view point" they were "saved" from, and reconciling that view point to a simple 2D profile is difficult at best.
Unfortunately, you're very mistaken about Cut3D.

1) It doesn't support a 4th axis.
2) It doesn't import vectors.

Cut3D imports 3D mesh surface models and creates 3D g-code to cut them. It can "slice" thick models into thinner slices, allowing very large objects to be cut. And it can create g-code for two sides of an object, allowing you to flip it over and cut the entire 3D model.

Fish4Fun
05-06-2011, 07:43 PM
Ger21,

I am NOT surprised I got it wrong; the list of things I am still trying to grasp is VERY LONG. My experience as a newbie (lucky enough to have access to numerous software packages) is that cut3d is difficult compared to Vcarve or Aspire for the VERY SIMPLE tasks I have attempted. I will say again that the Vectric software is by far the easiest software to go from 0 to product that I have tried. I honestly have barely scratched the surface of what the software is capable of, but based on my "playing" I would buy Vcarve (and plan to).

I am sorry if my post "got things wrong", but my suggestion that Vcarve is easier to use than cut3d is based solely on my experience (limited though it is). The only things I can make work in cut3d are the examples, with Vcarve // Aspire I can actually make gcode to make parts I design. I am certain cut3d will do the same thing, I just haven't figured it out yet.

Fish

Fish

ger21
05-06-2011, 07:50 PM
My guess is that your not importing the correct type of objects. Again, if you post your vector drawings, as well as your 3D models, we can tell you why they're not working.
:)