PDA

View Full Version : 14k gold jewelry cutting



lantern02
08-11-2005, 09:20 PM
I'm interested in cutting different designs into 14k gold. I've went from laser, to water jet, to cnc router and can't seem to find the right fit. We're interested in making very small designs such as hearts, names, and even circles into the metal. I'm hoping that someone can steer me in the right direction as to what machinery would be the best to use. The parts we're cutting are apprximately 0.3 mm in thickness and are 1 inch x 1inch in diameter. Any information would be helpful.

ViperTX
08-11-2005, 11:54 PM
If you're going to produce a bunch...like 100's...I would use a tool & die to punch the stuff out...it produces less scrap....and if you could also form them with the same setup...you know give them some roundness, etc.

lantern02
08-11-2005, 11:59 PM
are totally customized each time, so a tool and die really isn't an option. here is a pic of what i'm talking about.

JW Peters
08-12-2005, 11:01 PM
http://www.rainnea.com/cnc_toolkit.htm and here http://groupyahoo.com/group/CNC_Toolkit/messages

JW Peters
08-12-2005, 11:08 PM
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CNC_Toolkit/messages

lantern02
08-12-2005, 11:11 PM
doesn't seem to work. Thanks for your help. I saw a couple of itnersting points from your first link, anything specific I should be looking at?

JW Peters
08-12-2005, 11:15 PM
I don't know why the link changes when I post it. I copied and pasted it from the yahoo site. When I saw that it was incorrect I edited the link manually but when it posts it leaves out the "s'' and "." ??????? JP

lantern02
08-12-2005, 11:17 PM
I got in. anything specific I should be looking for. Or you feel I should be asking in there?

JW Peters
08-12-2005, 11:18 PM
Yes: I believe they make custom jewelry. The link to yahoo is on the page that the first link brings up.

lantern02
08-12-2005, 11:24 PM
im going to post in there. I think I found the answer somewhat, but i guess we'll see when I get the result. tanks for your patience with everything.

Yossi
09-16-2005, 07:19 AM
I used to make jewelry from 14k gold.
We used a regular small cnc machine.
For cutters we used carbide endmills from robb-jack.
0.020 dia. (can you believe some one actually make them?)
The spindle was a 30000 rpm from “precise” (remember to disconnect the power to the main spindle!!!) If you can, buy a faster one.
Surface speed of 350 = > 50000 rpm
Always cut the inside details before the outside.

RAMSSupport
09-17-2005, 12:58 AM
My Boss owns another business besides RAMS so you might give him a call. He spent about 20 or so years in the jewelry trade... He can help. E-mail or call him from http://www.positiveflow.com. Att: Dan. Hope this helps. Jack.

Stepper Monkey
01-09-2007, 08:31 AM
I used to do this exact work professionally, every piece unique, and lots of them. We tried everything, and there are tools available - endmills, pyramid, and profile bits down to only a few thousandths diameter - that will do the job nicely.
What we discovered, however, is that this is NOT a metal machining issue in the first place. You can spend a very long time, and mess with a lot of broken bits to do it in metal. It was a pain even with a $5000 NSK spindle on a ridiculously accurate machine.
It is far, far easier and cost effective to machine them out of jewelers wax first and then have the final form cast into 14k. Especially if they are cut all the way through like that example.

If you don't have the facilities or skill to cast and finish, there are trade houses that do just that - you send waxes and two days later get finished metal product back. They are cheap, too. They charge less than those 0.020 mills cost to replace I'm sure. That and you can get better accuracy in wax, as I can use 0.005 mills in wax without breaking.

mgdesigns
03-05-2007, 09:59 PM
I agree with Stepper Monkey. I've only been doing jewelry CAD for 8 months, and the milling CNC for about a month, and the end results are spectacular. If I design for 2.12mm round diamond and machine myself, and cast, a 2.12mm round diamond fits perfectly. I do not allow for shrinkage on the casting side, and now do not believe I need to. And the finish is great without prepping the waxes too. I just make the overlaps tighter, and sidesteps closer, and the details are great, even with 30 year old Master Pattern Blue machinists wax. Way Cool!! Hi Stepper Monkey.

Harryman
04-29-2007, 03:40 PM
I agree, besides a wider variety of cheaper bits to do the job, your feed speed can be higher in wax and you don't have to worry about reclaiming all the chips and dust. Just toss it away.

Casting houses on both coasts will cast your waxes overnight, so turn around is acceptable if you can't do it in house.

Barocco
05-04-2007, 12:12 AM
I am interesting very much those CNC prototype machines.I also wonder so much about which software and which machine is perfect for 3D jewellery?
Anyone has good ideas?

mgdesigns
05-04-2007, 12:23 PM
I use a ModelMaster CNC1000 for prototyping. We have the 4-axis version, and I use a pyramid cutter 10 degrees x .004" diameter tip for profiling, and long reach end mills for straight on cutting. With this combo I am making great looking and castable waxes. I use DeskProto software to convert my Rhino 3dm files (stl) to g-code for the machine. I am still learning ways to create, but that makes it fun every day.

Harryman
05-04-2007, 10:52 PM
I have a 4 axis milling machine originally built by Minitech that I've changed a bit to suit my tastes. Good solid machine, very fast and very accurate.

I use Wincnc to run the mill and Deskproto to generate the g code from my CAD/.stl files. I use Freeform for all my CAD designs.

If you are serious about getting or building a mill, don't start with a cheap one like I did. (A MaxNC) You'll just end up replacing it as you learn more and get proficient milling parts. You'll need accuracy to create super clean waxes. There are a variety of manufacturers out there now making good quality machines.

c-c-cncboy
05-21-2007, 04:47 AM
I agree that there's no point choosing a nasty little mill that will be cranky on backlash, accuracy, alignment ... all the things that turn time into s&^t. But there are actually some nice cheap mills out there, including Roland's MDX-15 and MDX-20 which have zero-backlash wire drives. What they need is a high speed spindle (the standard that comes with them is 6500rpm) which is easy to do with a Proxxon mounted correctly. And for a rotary you can get a zero backlash rotary (gulp, gosh, yes zero backlash) from http://www.fourth-axis.com that is incredible. Worth a look at some of their pages on rotaries, spindles, gallery. I have one and I can use the free Roland Modela Player 4 CAM software with it.
Terrence


I have a 4 axis milling machine originally built by Minitech that I've changed a bit to suit my tastes. Good solid machine, very fast and very accurate.

I use Wincnc to run the mill and Deskproto to generate the g code from my CAD/.stl files. I use Freeform for all my CAD designs.

If you are serious about getting or building a mill, don't start with a cheap one like I did. (A MaxNC) You'll just end up replacing it as you learn more and get proficient milling parts. You'll need accuracy to create super clean waxes. There are a variety of manufacturers out there now making good quality machines.

Harryman
05-21-2007, 06:44 PM
Looks like they're making some nice stuff, very well thought out. It would definitely make a "value" Roland worth considering for a first mill. They didn't have any prices on the site and I'm curious what would the total cost be to buy a mill, add a 4th axis, spindle mount and decent spindle.

Barocco
01-13-2010, 11:35 PM
I am in Jewellery industry for 27 years. I am goldsmith and I do all kind of Jewellery in hand made. Melting, rolling, cutting etc...
I have Rhino v4, Jewelcad, AutoCAD, Alibre design, 3D design. But I can't learning them, because very difficult. Good for make models for casting. But learning them really need a whole life.

aiyana
05-19-2010, 03:50 AM
HI ! is it true??????????????